Vincent Doublet

Vincent Doublet
Ulm University | UULM

PhD

About

64
Publications
26,559
Reads
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1,951
Citations
Introduction
My research interests are in the understanding the intimate relations between coevolving host and microorganisms. I work on invertebrate models across different types of interactions, from mutualism (mitochondria-host cell interaction) to parasitism (fungal and viral pathogens), using experimental approaches and next-gen sequencing tools. See my website: https://vincentdoublet.wordpress.com Follow me on Twitter: @VBSDoublet
Additional affiliations
August 2019 - present
Ulm University
Position
  • Research Associate
July 2017 - June 2019
The University of Edinburgh
Position
  • PostDoc Position
February 2016 - June 2017
University of Exeter
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
February 2011 - March 2013
Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg
Field of study
  • Honey bee host-pathogen interactions
December 2006 - March 2010
Université de Poitiers
Field of study
  • Molecular evolution
September 2004 - July 2006
Université de Rennes 1
Field of study
  • Ecology, Evolution

Publications

Publications (64)
Article
Full-text available
In 1977, a sample of diseased adult honeybees ( Apis mellifera ) from Egypt was found to contain large amounts of a previously unknown virus, Egypt bee virus, which was subsequently shown to be serologically related to deformed wing virus (DWV). By sequencing the original isolate, we demonstrate that Egypt bee virus is in fact a fourth unique, majo...
Article
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The ratio of amino acids to carbohydrates (AA:C) that bumble bees consume has been reported to affect their survival. However, it is unknown how dietary AA:C ratio affects other bumble bee fitness traits (e.g., fecundity, condition) and possible trade-offs between them. Moreover, while individual AAs affect phenotype in many species, the effects of...
Article
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In the past centuries, viruses have benefited from globalization to spread across the globe, infecting new host species and populations. A growing number of viruses have been documented in the western honey bee, Apis mellifera. Several of these contribute significantly to honey bee colony losses. This review synthetizes the knowledge of the diversi...
Article
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Deformed wing virus (DWV) is an emerging infectious disease of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) that is considered a major cause of elevated losses of honey bee colonies. DWV comprises two widespread genotypes: the originally described genotype A, and genotype B. In adult honey bees, DWV-B has been shown to be more virulent than DWV-A. However, their...
Article
Full-text available
Bees are considered to be threatened globally, with severe overwinter losses of the most important commercial pollinator, the Western honeybee, a major concern in the Northern Hemisphere. Emerging infectious diseases have risen to prominence due to their temporal correlation with colony losses. Among these is Deformed wing virus (DWV), which has be...
Article
Full-text available
After the publication of this work [1] it was noticed that there was a typesetting error in figure 5 where two additional red lines were added in the sections "gene expression profiles" and "transformed gene expression profiles". The original article was corrected to remove these lines.
Article
Full-text available
Background: Organisms typically face infection by diverse pathogens, and hosts are thought to have developed specific responses to each type of pathogen they encounter. The advent of transcriptomics now makes it possible to test this hypothesis and compare host gene expression responses to multiple pathogens at a genome-wide scale. Here, we perform...
Article
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Regulation of gene expression in the brain plays an important role in behavioral plasticity and decision making in response to external stimuli. However, both can be severely affected by environmental factors, such as parasites and pathogens. In honey bees, the emergence and re-emergence of pathogens and potential for pathogen co-infection and inte...
Article
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Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) have contributed significantly to the current biodiversity crisis, leading to widespread epidemics and population loss. Owing to genetic variation in pathogen virulence, a complete understanding of species decline requires the accurate identification and characterization of EIDs. We explore this issue in the West...
Article
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As pollinators, bees are cornerstones for terrestrial ecosystem stability and key components in agricultural productivity. All animals, including bees, are associated with a diverse community of microbes, commonly referred to as the microbiome. The bee microbiome is likely to be a crucial factor affecting host health. However, with the exception of...
Data
Comprehensive overview of Apis bee diseases, including known hosts and known effects on hosts.
Data
Comprehensive overview of Apis bee microbes.
Data
Literature support for the non-Apis bee microorganisms. Download
Data
Literature support for the Apis bee diseases. Download
Data
Literature support for the Apis bee microbes. Download
Data
Comprehensive overview of non-Apis bee microorganisms.
Article
Full-text available
A faithful expression of the mitochondrial DNA is crucial for cell survival. Animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) presents a highly compact gene organization. The typical 16.5 kbp animal mtDNA encodes 13 proteins, 2 rRNAs and 22 tRNAs. In the backyard pillbug Armadillidium vulgare, the rather small 13.9 kbp mtDNA encodes the same set of proteins and rR...
Article
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Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae are gut parasites that infect western honey bees (Apis mellifera) worldwide. N. ceranae is an exotic infectious disease agent of A. mellifera, having been originally described in the Asian honey bee (Apis cerana), while N. apis is native to the western honey bee. To better understand the dynamics and epidemiology of t...
Article
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There is increasing appreciation that hosts in natural populations are subject to infection by multiple parasite species. Yet the epidemiological and ecological processes determining the outcome of mixed infections are poorly understood. Here, we use two intracellular gut parasites (Microsporidia), one exotic and one co-evolved in the western honey...
Article
Two pathogens co-infecting a common host can either interact positively (facilitation), negatively (competition) or act independently. A correlative study has suggested that two pathogens of the honey bee, Nosema ceranae and Deformed wing virus (DWV), interact negatively within a host (Costa et al., 2011). To test this hypothesis, we sequentially c...
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Microbial pathogens are thought to have a profound impact on insect populations. Honey bees are suffering from elevated colony losses in the northern hemisphere possibly because of a variety of emergent microbial pathogens, with which pesticides may interact to exacerbate their impacts. To reveal such potential interactions, we administered at subl...
Article
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The aim of this study was to improve cage systems for maintaining adult honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) workers under in vitro laboratory conditions. To achieve this goal, we experimentally evaluated the impact of different cages, developed by scientists of the international research network COLOSS (Prevention of honey bee COlony LOSSes), on the phys...
Article
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The microsporidian Nosema ceranae was first reported from Beijing, China, in the Asian honey bee, Apis cerana, which is often assumed to be its original host (Fries et al., 1996). Nowadays N. ceranae is found worldwide in Apis mellifera (Klee et al., 2007), and it has been blamed as a cause of colony collapse in A. mellifera (Paxton, 2010). In the...
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Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is usually depicted as a circular molecule, however, there is increasing evidence that linearization of mtDNA evolved independently many times in organisms such as fungi, unicellular eukaryotes, and animals. Recent observations in various models with linear mtDNA revealed the presence of conserved inverted repeats (IR) at...
Article
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Methods are described for working with Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae in the field and in the laboratory. For fieldwork, different sampling methods are described to determine colony level infections at a given point in time, but also for following the temporal infection dynamics. Suggestions are made for how to standardise field trials for evaluati...
Article
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Adult honey bees are maintained in vitro in laboratory cages for a variety of purposes. For example, researchers may wish to perform experiments on honey bees caged individually or in groups to study aspects of parasitology, toxicology, or physiology under highly controlled conditions, or they may cage whole frames to obtain freshly emerged workers...
Article
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Wolbachia bacteria are obligate intracellular alpha-Proteobacteria of arthropods and nematodes. Although widespread among isopod crustaceans, they have seldom been found in non-isopod crustacean species. Here, we report Wolbachia infection in fourteen new crustacean species. Our results extend the range of Wolbachia infections in terrestrial isopod...
Article
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Metazoan mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is generally composed of circular monomeric molecules. However, a few exceptions do exist and among them two terrestrial isopods Armadillidium vulgare and Porcellionides pruinosus have an atypical mtDNA composed of linear monomers associated with circular "head-to-head" dimers: a very unusual structure for animal...
Article
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In animals, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is generally composed of ~16 kb circular monomer molecules. However, two species of terrestrial Crustaceans Armadillidium vulgare and Porcellionides pruinosus (Isopoda: Oniscidea) are exceptions. Their mtDNA is composed of ~14 kb linear monomers associated to ~28 kb circular head-to-head dimers. In order to des...
Article
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Due to essentially maternal inheritance and a bottleneck effect during early oogenesis, newly arising mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations segregate rapidly in metazoan female germlines. Consequently, heteroplasmy (i.e. the mixture of mtDNA genotypes within an organism) is generally resolved to homoplasmy within a few generations. Here, we report an...
Article
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Aphids exclusively feed on plant phloem sap that contains much sugar and some nonessential amino acids but is poor in lipids and proteins. Conventionally, it has been believed that aphids substantially have no intestinal digestion of proteins. However, we here report an unexpected finding that cysteine protease genes of the family cathepsin B are m...
Article
Full-text available
The crustacean isopod Armadillidium vulgare is characterized by an unusual approximately 42-kb-long mitochondrial genome consisting of two molecules co-occurring in mitochondria: a circular approximately 28-kb dimer formed by two approximately 14-kb monomers fused in opposite polarities and a linear approximately 14-kb monomer. Here we determined t...

Projects

Project (1)
Project