Vincent Billy

Vincent Billy
University of British Columbia - Vancouver | UBC · Department of Zoology

Master of Science

About

4
Publications
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56
Citations
Introduction
I am currently a PhD candidate at the Zoology Department of the University of British Columbia. I am working on the ecology and evolution of intestinal_eukaryote-host-gut_microbiota interaction in the context of animal health and fitness. More specifically, I am describing the genetic diversity and host specificity of Blastocystis across vertebrates, its interactions with the immune system and the gut microbiota and its ability to cause disease or promote health.

Publications

Publications (4)
Article
Full-text available
Protists are a normal component of mammalian intestinal ecosystems that live alongside, and interact with, bacterial microbiota. Blastocystis, one of the most common intestinal eukaryotes, is reported as a pathogen that causes inflammation and disease, though health consequences likely vary depending on host health, the gut ecosystem, and genetic d...
Article
Full-text available
Documenting the natural diversity of eukaryotic organisms in the nonhuman primate (NHP) gut is important for understanding the evolution of the mammalian gut microbiome, its role in digestion, health and disease, and the consequences of anthropogenic change on primate biology and conservation. Despite the ecological significance of gut-associated e...
Article
Social dispersal is an important feature of population dynamics. When female mammals occur in polygynous groups, their dispersal decisions are conditioned by various female‐, male‐, and group‐related factors. Among them, the influence of disease often remains difficult to assess. To address this challenge, we used long‐term monitoring data from two...
Article
Full-text available
Infections by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and members of the genus Ranavirus (Rv) are increasingly reported as significant determinants of amphibian population die-offs. The complexity associated with their transmission and spatial distribution leads to an increase in demand for comprehensive reporting systems and global...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Diversity and microbial ecology of the intestinal protist Blastocystis