Vijay Kolinjivadi

Vijay Kolinjivadi
University of Antwerp | UA · Institute of Development Policy

Doctor of Philosophy

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20
Publications
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75
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Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Scholars have argued that the success of conservation instruments depends on improved scientific knowledge in linking ecosystem functioning with value-reflecting prices to optimize the production and delivery of ecosystem services (ES). However, these scholars assume that greater sophistication of scientific inquiry rests on ES thinking, without re...
Article
In the Canadian province of Prince Edward Island (PEI), producers have been financially incentivized over the past decade to halt soil erosion, improve water quality, and promote habitat for biodiversity through a provincial programme called “Alternative Land Use Services” (ALUS). ALUS is the first example of a provincial-wide application of paymen...
Article
This paper argues that Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) serve as a neoliberal performative act, in which idealized conditions are re-constituted by well-resourced and networked epistemic communities with the objective of bringing a distinctly instrumental and utilitarian relationality between humans and nature into existence. We illustrate the...
Article
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In this commentary we respond to Fletcher and Büscher's (2017) recent article in this journal on Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) as neoliberal ‘conceit’. The authors claim that focusing attention on the micro-politics of PES design and implementation fails to expose an underlying neoliberal governmentality, and therefore only reinforces neoli...
Article
‘Payments for ecosystem services’ (PES) is rapidly becoming a popular governance intervention within natural resource management to align land-use stewardship to conserve critical ecosystem services while simultaneously improving human well-being through the provision of incentives. This paper introduces two novel components for refining the legiti...
Article
Governing ecosystem services entails the recognition of mutual and interdependent relations between different actors (i.e. beneficiaries, providers and intermediaries) in relation to each other and the living world. Appreciating these social interdependencies requires understanding ecosystem services as commons, generated at the entanglement of soc...
Chapter
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This chapter explores tensions between critique and engagement through the lens of four cases drawn from our differing experiences as critical scholars but holding in common direct engagement with marginalized communities and a focus on a particular conceptualization and approach to natural resource management: payments for ecosystem services (PES)...
Article
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Payments for Environmental Services (PES) are premised upon the provision of monetary incentives to induce land-use practices viewed to be beneficial for advancing tropical conservation. A recent article published by Pagiola et al. in this journal claims that PES successfully transitioned land-use from agricultural use in Matiguás-Río Blanco, Nicar...
Article
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Incentive-based mechanisms, such as payments for ecosystem services (PES) are increasingly being employed to encourage adoption of biodiversity conservation practices in agriculture. Farmers’ participation in a PES depends – amongst other factors – on their interactions with previous programs and schemes. This research analyses how the institutiona...
Article
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In response to widespread soil erosion, biodiversity loss, and rapid social and ecological homogenization of agri-environmental landscapes, economic incentives such as payments for ecosystem services (PES) are presented by natural resource managers as the most efficient way to address the unintended consequences of intensive agriculture. In this ar...
Article
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The tendency of capitalist modernity to impose predictable, homogenous and linear representations of time for economic productivity has made it increasingly difficult, if not impossible, to effectively respond to catastrophic environmental changes that are emergent, sudden, non-linear and unpredictable. A confusion between the actions and consequen...
Article
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Recurrent claims that ecological economics (EE) is moving conceptually closer to environmental economics arise from the tendency to understand economic transformation through dualistic and interacting representations of 'nature' and 'society'. The methodological and value pluralism primordial to EE praxis is left under-theorized in the form of eith...
Article
The agricultural sector is considered as an important contributor to diffuse nutrient pollution within watersheds. While hierarchical models of environmental governance are costly to implement when targeting diffuse pollution, market-based water quality trading (WQT) is viewed as a win–win solution. Based on economic incentives, WQT promoters sugge...
Article
Payments for ecosystem service (PES) schemes have become increasingly popular in attempting to promote ecological stewardship and conservation behaviour through provisioning of economic incentives often as market-inspired transactions. The scholarship and empirical application of PES schemes has tended to focus on contract design and conditionality...
Article
Proponents of payments for ecosystem services (PES) schemes advocate targeting payments to geographical areas that can: (a) maintain or enhance ecosystem services, (b) permit economically efficient arrangements and (c) address poverty objectives. The location of these efficient, effective and equitable (or triple-win) solutions is viewed as the ‘ho...
Article
Understanding linkages between human well-being and ecological stewardship at the land-water nexus is needed in order to develop effective, equitable, and resilient institutions to govern watershed resources. In this paper, we argue that payments for ecosystem services (PES) plays a useful role for achieving integrated and adaptive water resource m...
Article
China and Vietnam have developed some of the most ambitious payments for ecosystem services (PES) initiatives for watershed conservation and forest management. These include the Sloping Land Conversion Programme in China and pilot projects designed to implement Decision 380 and the subsequent national PES law in Vietnam. This study reviews how thes...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
EPICC applies a polycentric governance and environmental justice approach to investigate four selected commodity chains (cattle, palm oil, gold and tin) that ‘feed’ the European market. EPICC seeks to map the governance and power links that connect the multiple territories of production and transformation and their plural legal systems with the European regulatory, political and socio-economic space. By doing so, EPICC identifies and analyses leverage points (chokeholds) and blind spots, and sheds light on the micro and macro conditions that may facilitate the mitigation of environmental and social impacts that occur at the selected locations of production (in Brazil, Colombia and Indonesia).