Victoria Hollis

Victoria Hollis
University of California, Santa Cruz | UCSC · Department of Psychology

Ph.D. Cognitive Psychology | M.S. Psychology | B.S. Cognitive Science | B.A. Economics

About

10
Publications
9,922
Reads
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375
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2013 - March 2018
University of California, Santa Cruz
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
Algorithms and sensors are increasingly deployed for highly personal aspects of our everyday lives. Recent work suggests people have imperfect understanding of system outputs, often assuming sophisticated capabilities and deferring to feedback. We explore how people construe algorithmic interpretations of emotional data in personal informatics syst...
Thesis
Full-text available
We tested whether Affective PI systems that reflect goals for particular emotion outcomes (Improvement) have counterproductive effects for well-being and user engagement. These outcomes were contrasted against systems that instead reflect goals for Self-Knowledge, a top user interest (Hollis et al., 2018). Study 1 examined the effects of implicit g...
Article
Engaging in daily activities that engender positive affect (e.g., exercise and socializing) is critical for emotional well-being and is effective in reducing clinical depression. However, current digital mental health interventions have not exploited recommender approaches to encourage such healthy behaviors. This paper tests the feasibility of rec...
Preprint
Full-text available
We demonstrate that users may be prone to place an inordinate amount of trust in black box algorithms that are framed as intelligent. We deploy an algorithm that purportedly assesses the positivity and negativity of a users' writing emotional writing. In actuality, the algorithm responds in a random fashion. We qualitatively examine the paths to tr...
Article
Full-text available
Current behavior change systems often demand extremely advanced sensemaking skills, requiring users to interpret personal datasets in order to understand and change behavior. We describe EmotiCal, a system to help people better manage their emotions, that finesses such complex sensemaking by directly recommending specific mood-boosting behaviors to...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Computer Science (CS) and related skills such as programming and Computational Thinking (CT) have recently become topics of global interest, with a large number of programming games created to engage and educate players. However, there has been relatively limited work to assess 1) the efficacy of such games with respect to critical educational fact...
Article
We explore the Examined Life, informing the design of reflective systems to promote emotional well-being, a critical health issue. People now have increasingly rich, digital records of highly personal data about what they said, did and felt in the past. But social science research shows that people have difficulty in tracking and regulating their e...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Maintaining work focus when on a computer is a major challenge, and people often feel that they use their time ineffectively. To improve focus we designed meTime, a real-time awareness application that shows users how they allocate their time across applications. In two real-world deployments involving 118 participants, we examined whether greater...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Preventable behaviors contribute to many life threatening health problems. Behavior-change technologies have been deployed to modify these, but such systems typically draw on traditional behavioral theories that overlook affect. We examine the importance of emotion tracking for behavior change. First, we conducted interviews to explore how emotions...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
As people document more of their lives online, some recent systems are encouraging people to later revisit those recordings, a practice we’re calling technology-mediated reflection (TMR). Since we know that unmediated reflection benefits psychological well-being, we explored whether and how TMR affects well-being. We built Echo, a smartphone applic...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Many commercial and research technologies advertise the ability to detect stressful states, yet it is unclear which ones are most valid. Has there been any research comparing multiple different measurements (e.g., HRV, GSR, respiration, EEG) to subjective ratings of stress (what participants -actually- report feeling) and also levels of cortisol (blood, saliva, etc.)?
It would be really, really helpful to see a cross comparison to get a better sense of what is the least bogus proxy to stress. Thanks a bunch!

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Understand how different forms of physical embodiment and interaction in educational games impact player learning, problem-solving, performance, and emotional outcomes.