Victor Benno Meyer-Rochow

Victor Benno Meyer-Rochow
Andong National University · Dept.of Plant Medicals (Agric. Sci Tech. Res. Inst.)

PhD; DSc (both ANU)

About

551
Publications
209,451
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8,732
Citations
Citations since 2016
102 Research Items
3948 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220200400600800
20162017201820192020202120220200400600800
20162017201820192020202120220200400600800
20162017201820192020202120220200400600800
Introduction
Victor Benno Meyer-Rochow is affiliated with the "Department of Ecology and Genetics" of the University of Oulu and is currently working as Visit. Prof. of Entomology at Andong National University (South Korea). V. B. does research in Comparative Functional Anatomy and Ultrastructure, Sensory Ecology, Biological Anthropology, Entomology & Marine Biology. One of his current projects is part of the 'Europ. Network of Bioadhesion Expertise (ENBA)'. See also: https://bioforthebiobuff.wordpress.com
Additional affiliations
September 2014 - December 2018
Research Institute of Luminous Organisms
Position
  • Managing Director
March 2014 - July 2014
Pyongyang University of Science and Technology
Pyongyang University of Science and Technology
Position
  • Professor
August 2001 - January 2014
Jacobs University
Position
  • Full Professor (Biol./Physiol.)
Education
October 1970 - January 1974
Australian National University (Canberra)
Field of study
  • Neuroscience PhD 1974; Ethnobiology DSc 2004

Publications

Publications (551)
Article
The lepidopteran family of the Epipyropidae contains currently 32 known species of moths with larvae that are parasitic on plant and leafhoppers as well as cicadas. This paper focuses on behavioural aspects of the final instar of the cicada parasite Epipomponia nawai (Dyer 1904) on the cicada Hyalessa maculaticollis (de Motschulsky 1866) and repres...
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This Special Issue of Foods represents Volume 2 of the topic “Edible Insects as Innovative Foods: Nutritional, Functional and Acceptability Assessments” [...]
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Summary: The invasive polydesmid millipede Chamberlinius hualienensis Wang 1956 has been known to occur on the Japanese Izu Island of Hachijojima since 2002. Several mass outbreaks of the species have been reported and during the 2015 outbreak all the specimens that were examined had deutonymphsofanunidentifiedHistiostomaspeciesontheirbodies.Thespe...
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The two forward-looking eyes and their ultrastructural organization of an 18 mm long adult bioluminescent female millipede (Paraspirobolus lucifugus) were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Each eye contained approximately 23 ommatidia with 50–60 μm wide and 80 um thick corneal lenses that con...
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How in the Antarctic icefish, generally, and Pseudochaenichthys georgianus, in particular, otoliths increase in size and build new material as the fish ages and passes through different life phases is largely unexplored. Morphometric details of 3418 otoliths of Ps. georgianus from S. Georgia and 318 from S. Shetland, were processed and proportions...
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We explored the indigenous local knowledge associated to the use of snails by Baiga people in Baihar tehsil of Balaghat district in central India through interview with a semi-structured questionnaire. Results revealed that Baiga people widely accept snails of 3-5 morpho-groups belonging to Ampullariidae, and Viviparidae family as food. Besides, us...
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In the present paper, we describe the farming system of Pomacea canaliculata, an edible freshwater snail, as it is practiced by a farmer as mini-livestock in the vicinity of Andong in Korea. We visited the snail farm several times in the summer and winter of the year and conducted interviews with the farm manager using a semi-structured questionnai...
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The unusual case of a male Cryptotympana atrata cicada from China attempting to mate with a dead male conspecific is described and illustrated. Although hitherto unreported, necrophilic behaviour in the form of an attempted necrocoitus, involving dead male or female corpses, may not be as isolated a case as has been previously assumed, but it does...
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The bumble bee Bombus polaris (Curtis 1835) is known from the northernmost region of Greenland. But how it can survive there, where in terms of geographic origin it came from, and which species in addition to B. pyrrhopygus (Friese 1902) genetically it is most closely related to are insufficiently answered questions that have motivated us to carry...
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Background References to insects in myths, stories, and idioms can be found in almost any culture, but with regard to references involving honey bee species in the Asia-Australian region, little information is available. Such references to bees can be highly informative by revealing attitudes of admiration, fear, ignorance, or even revulsion toward...
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Despite the consumption of bee brood in several parts of the world, particularly in the tropical areas, the practice has received comparatively little attention. We have reviewed all the available information on the nutrient composition and functional properties of different developmental stages of honey bee workers belonging to different species a...
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Insects represent a sustainable, protein-rich food source widely consumed in Asia, Africa, and South America. Eating Clanis bilineata tsingtauica Mell is common in the eastern part of China. A comparative characterization of nutrients in the meat and epidermis of C. bilineata tsingtauica was performed in this study. The results showed this insect t...
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In this study, cricket chitosan was used as a prebiotic. Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Bifidobacterium adolescentis were identified as probiotic bacteria. Cricket chitin was deacetylated to chitosan and added to either De Man Rogosa and Sharpe or Salmonella/Shigella bacterial growth media at the rates of 1%, 5%, 10%, or 20...
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Suicide data for this study were available for the period of March 1988 to June 2011, and involved 2111 male and 494 female victims from the Finnish province of Oulu. Data for lunar phases during that period were categorised into three groups: new moon (<25% visible), full moon (>75% visible) and other times with values in between. Seasonal effects...
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The term bioluminescence refers to a conspicuous light emission displayed by numerous aquatic and terrestrial organisms. This phenomenon has so far not been observed in several taxonomic groups like archaea, protista, platyhelminthes, chelicerata, cephalochordata, amphibians, reptiles, birds, plants, and mammals. However, some luminescent bacteria,...
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The larvae, pupae and adult of the world’s largest hornet Vespa mandarinia are a nutritious food popular among the different ethnic communities of Nagaland. The traditional method of collecting, rearing and consuming V. mandarinia still persists among the tribal people. Semi-domestication of V. mandarinia practiced in the region has been found to f...
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The ability to repair injuries among reptiles, i.e., ectothermic amniotes, is similar to that of mammals with some noteworthy exceptions. While large wounds in turtles and crocodilians are repaired through scarring, the reparative capacity involving the tail derives from a combined process of wound healing and somatic growth, the latter being conti...
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We examined the contents of nutritional importance, i.e., amino acids, fatty acids and minerals of different developmental stages of drones of two honey bee subspecies, namely Apis mellifera carnica and A. m. mellifera. The results revealed that, in general, individual amino acid amounts and therefore the total protein increased along with the deve...
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Objective: To collect ethnozoological data in connection with medicinal animals and their products used by the inhabitants of the Arba Minch Zuriya region of Ethiopia and to put on record information on traditional treatments of diseases and disorders. Methods: The survey was conducted during the months of February to May 2018. Data were gathered t...
Article
Full-text available
The term bioluminescence refers to a conspicuous light emission displayed by numerous aquatic and terrestrial organisms. This phenomenon has so far not been observed in several taxonomic groups like archaea, protista, platyhelminthes, chelicerata, cephalochordata, amphibians, reptiles, birds, plants, and mammals. However, some luminescent bacteria,...
Article
The semi‐organized insect industry of India primarily includes apiculture, sericulture and lac culture. In the last two decades the production of raw silk, including mulberry and “vanya silk”, has doubled. An increasing trend for the country has also been observed with regard to honey and beeswax production. India, moreover, stands in the frontline...
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Edible insects have been considered as either nutritious food itemsper se, or as wholesome ingredients to various dishes and components of traditional subsistence. Protein, fat, mineral and vitamin contents in insects generally satisfy the requirements of healthy food, although there is considerable variation associated with insect species, collect...
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Aquatica leii Fu and Ballantyne is a species of rare aquatic firefly and endemic in China. It is considered good material to study the molecular mechanism of sexual flash communication systems. To improve conservation and behavioral research strategies, large-scale genetic studies involving gene-expression analysis are required and reverse transcri...
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Background The ethnic communities in Nagaland have kept a close relationship with nature since time immemorial and have traditionally used different kinds of insects and their products as folk medicine to treat a variety of human ills and diseases. The present study was conducted to record the entomotherapeutic practices of seven different ethnic g...
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We surveyed the local populations of Kétou and Pobè in Southeast Benin through interviews and with the aid of a semi-structured questionnaire in order to understand how they currently perceive entomophagy, an age-old tradition in their communities. The study revealed that the majority of the population was familiar with the use of insects as food,...
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We genetically identified three different species of hornets and analyzed the nutrient compositions of their edible brood. Samples were collected from a commercial production unit in Shizong province of China and from forests near Andong City in Korea. The species were identified as Vespa velutina, V. mandarinia, and V. basalis from China and V. ve...
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We analysed German and Finnish idioms that make reference to insects, especially Diptera and Hymenoptera. Idioms can become integrated into feelings like irritation, contemptuous attitudes, and even anger and disgust. However, idioms can also convey explanations, humour, encouragement and advice. We assigned the idioms to five major groups: 1. Thos...
Article
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Aging Antarctic icefish is difficult because of their lack of scales and poorly calcified bones. Icefish ages must therefore be estimated from otoliths. We describe a method of reading daily micro-increments in connection with shape, size and mass analyses of the otoliths of the South Georgia icefish Pseudochaenichthys georgianus. Changes in otolit...
Book
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A collection of short articles covering a variety of topics ranging from comparative physiology and anatomy to ecology, genetics, and behaviour similar but not identical to the blogs in https://bioforthebiobuff.wordpress.com
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This Special Issue of Foods explores different aspects of how insects can be used as a novel resource for food and feed. Some contributions deal with questions of acceptability and legality, others tackle problems related to innovative techniques in processing and marketing food, and yet another group of papers highlights the use of insects and the...
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Writing a 200-word abstract about the life of a 76-year-old scientist, in which luck played a significant role, is not an easy task. Even knowing this scientist well (for I am talking about myself) does not make it any easier. When you notice something is not right, do not fear changing your major (I changed twice before settling on Fisheries and M...
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Icefish populations continue to decline. Historical as well as current over-exploitations of stocks aggravated by climate change are frequently seen as responsible for the decline. However, natural oscillations in Antarctic fish and krill populations associated with natural climatic fluctuations, co-occurring with fisheries exploitation hinder dete...
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Using animals and their products to treat patients suffering from a range of health conditions has a long history and is still common in many parts of the world. We investigated such zootherapeutic uses among two tribes who inhabit different areas of North-East India: the Tangsa and the Wancho. Overexploitation of the animals they use, however, cou...
Article
Dorsal crest scales and those of the tail spines of the tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus) represent different specializations involved in display and protection. Erection of the dorsal crest occurs in males during combat and courtship, but tail spines are not noticeably involved in these activities. In both scale derivatives corneous beta proteins (CBP...
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Cultural and ritual uses of animals beyond those for food and medicine should not be dismissed if we wish to understand the pressure that wildlife is under. We documented such uses for the Tangsa and Wancho tribals of Eastern Arunachal Pradesh (India). Group discussions with assembled members of 10 accessible villages in each of the tribal areas we...
Article
An extraordinary micro-structural similarity between squid sucker teeth and the egg shell of a terrestrial planarian worm has been reported, but to date only the amino acid content of the squid sucker tooth has been available. This prompted us to analyse the amino acid content of the planarian egg shell. Although both share an absence of detectable...
Article
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We compared nutrient compositions of honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones of different developmental stages from two different populations—the Italian honey bee reared in Korea and Buckfast bees from Denmark. Analyses included amino acid, fatty acid, and mineral content as well as evaluations of antioxidant properties and haemolysis activities. The co...
Article
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It is known that idioms, proverbs, and slogans can become integrated into feelings like irritation, contemptuous attitudes, and even anger and disgust. Idioms making reference to insects, spiders, and other invertebrates occur in all languages, but they convey mostly negative content in people of Western cultural orientation. By analyzing a subgrou...
Article
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A survey involving 329 randomly selected respondents (172 male; 157 female) from Korea and 203 (109 male; 94 female) from Ethiopia has revealed that significantly fewer of the Ethiopian respondents were prepared to accept insects as human food than Koreans did. Vertical transmission of entomophagic knowledge was important for Koreans, but of neglig...
Chapter
Full-text available
We assessed nutrients composition of the Asian honeybee Apis cerana and giant honeybee Apis dorsata. Abundances of individual amino acids and thus their total amounts were found to be considerably higher in A. cerana pupae than those of A. dorsata pupae. The immature developmental stages of honey bees contained higher amounts of fat than the adults...
Chapter
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Many different entomophagous communities of the world consume termites particularly in time of insect’s swarming. We analysed the nutritional composition of the termites that are being used as food and found that protein and fatty acid contents differed between adult and nymphal stages. All the tested amino acids satisfied the level of a nearly ide...
Article
Full-text available
Aging Antarctic icefish is difficult because of their lack of scales and poorly calcified bones. Icefish ages must therefore be estimated from otoliths. We describe a method of reading daily micro-increments in connection with shape, size and mass analyses of the otoliths of the South Georgia icefish Pseudochaenichthys georgianus . Changes in otoli...
Article
Full-text available
ENTOMOLOGIE HEUTE Vol. 30: 45-53 Ultrastructure of the compound eye of a 0.65 mm long "three-eyed" gall midge 57 Entomologie heute 31 (2019) Entomologie heute 31 (2019): 57-72 Consequences of Extreme Miniaturization: The Ultrastructure of the Compound Eyes of a 0.65 mm Long "Three-Eyed" Gall Midge (Diptera; Cecidomyiidae) Folgen einer extremen Min...
Article
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Abstract : A re-assessment of the age structure of the population of the Antarctic icefish Pseudochaenichthys georgianus based on body length data covering the years 1976−2009 and including larvae and postlarvae collected in 1989 and 1990 allowed us to define age groups 0, I, and II as containing fish with respective body lengths of 6−9 cm, 15−27 c...
Article
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The honey bee queen shows extreme polyandry and controlling the mating partners can only be possible either by artificial insemination or having remote isolated mating locations. Here we report on the German North Sea island of Heligoland. Because of its location 60 km from the mainland, the lack of a local population of honey bees, its size of jus...
Preprint
Full-text available
A re-assessment of the age structure of the population of the Antarctic icefish Pseudochaenichthys georgianus based on body length data covering the years 1976−2009 and including larvae and postlarvae collected in 1989 and 1990 allowed us to define age groups 0, I, and II as containing fish with respective body lengths of 6−9 cm, 15−27 cm and 27−39...
Article
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Amber contains numerous well-preserved adult aquatic insects (e.g., aquatic beetles – Coleoptera, water bugs – Heteroptera, dragonflies – Odonata, caddisflies – Trichoptera, mayflies – Ephemeroptera, stone flies – Plecoptera). Since amber is fossilised resin of terrestrial conifer trees, it is an enigma how aquatic insects have ended up in the resi...
Article
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Bumblebees have apposition compound eyes (one on either side of the head) and three small single-lens ocelli on the frons of their head capsule. The surface of the eye is smooth and interommatidial hairs, present in the honeybee, are not developed. Each ommatidium (approx. 26 µm in diameter) is capped by a hexagonal facet and contains in its centre...
Article
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Animals use adhesive secretions in highly diverse ways, such as for settlement, egg anchorage, mating, active or passive defence, etc. One of the most interesting functions is the use of bioadhesives to capture prey, as the bonding has to be performed within milliseconds and often under unfavourable conditions. While much is understood about the ad...
Article
The process of tail regeneration in the tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus) is not entirely known. Similarity to and differences from lizard tail regenerations are indicated in the present histological and ultrastructural study. Regeneration is influenced by the animal's age and ambient temperature, but in comparison to that of lizards it is very slow an...
Article
The coleopteran family Ptiliidae (featherwing beetles) includes some of the smallest insects known with most of the representatives of this family measuring less than 1 mm in body length. A small body size largely determines the morphology, physiology, and biology of an organism and affects the organization of complex sense organs. Information on t...
Chapter
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The term "food taboo" is explained and contrasted with "food avoidance". Food taboos can involve plants as well as animals and their products, solids as well as liquids, hot, cold, fresh or preserved items. Examples of some major reasons for the establishment of food taboos are given and include those of magico-religious origins presented as comman...
Chapter
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The consumption of some non-crustacean arthropods like insects and spiders has undoubtedly accompanied the evolution of humankind from its beginnings. About 2000 species of insects are known to be consumed by different ethnic groups. With few exceptions, insects are generally non-toxic, nutritious, abundant, easy to collect and relatively uncomplic...
Chapter
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As shell remains of mollusks in middens indicate, the consumption of bivalves, e.g. snails, both freshwater and terrestrial species, has undoubtedly had a tradition in the New as well as the Old World that goes back 10,000 years or more. With few exceptions, snails are generally non-toxic, nutritious, abundant, easy to collect and relatively uncomp...
Article
Full-text available
Edible silkworm pupae, known in Korea as "beondaegi" and seen as a valuable byproduct of the silk industry have been part of the local food spectrum for centuries. Edible crickets on the other hand, represented in Korea primarily by the species Gryllus bimaculatus and Teleogryllus emma as our research has shown, are relative newcomers and have been...
Article
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Millipedes may cause unexpected damage when they are introduced to new locations, becoming invaders that leave behind their old parasites and predators. Therefore, it was interesting to find numerous rhabditid nematodes within the gut of the invasive phytophagous millipede Chamberlinius hualienensis Wang, 1956 (Diplopoda, Paradoxosomatidae) from Ha...
Article
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Globalization of the human diet has resulted in a shrinkage of the number of food crops. Most of the traditional native staples have been replaced with a few commercial crops of often less nutritional merit. As a result, the burden of non-communicable disorders has increased and cases of so-called 'hidden hunger' have become more prevalent. In this...
Article
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Abstract At least 65 insect species of 30 families and 9 orders, namely Orthoptera (15 species), Odonata (12), Coleoptera (11), Hymenoptera (10), Hemiptera (9), Lepidoptera (5) and one species each of Ephemeroptera, Isoptera and Mantodea find acceptance as food by Adi and Apatani tribals. Adi use overall more species than Apatani: 53 species of 24...