Victor W Meyer

Victor W Meyer
Massey University · Institute of Agriculture and Environment

PhD (Entomology)

About

13
Publications
9,928
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
135
Citations
Introduction
• Currently collaborating on Project Isopoda NZ with Maria Minor (Massey U., Palmerston Nth) and Stefano Taiti (CNR, Florence) - http://nzslaters.massey.ac.nz • Previously published on termites (Isoptera) when at University of Pretoria. NOTE: The skills below pertain more to topical skill-sets than individual skills per se.

Publications

Publications (13)
Book
Full-text available
Nature conservation in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, has many facets ranging from the ethical to the pragmatic. Victor Meyer’s diary, kept during his first, fulltime year in the field, reflects on most of the practices developed and conventions followed to meet the challenges faced by park rangers of the early 1990s, whether stationed at a big game...
Article
Full-text available
This study quantifies and discusses food consumption by the termite Macrotermes natalensis based on gut analysis. It introduces a formula that is used to determine the amount of food consumed by foraging organisms such as termites. The annual food consumption is given by the formula 365 mnp/t, where m = individual mass of ashed crop-gizzard content...
Thesis
Full-text available
This thesis reports on the number of individuals in Macrotermes natalensis (Hav.) colonies, their biomass and food consumption in the northern Kruger National Park (KNP). The ecology of M. natalensis is largely undocumented despite the abundance of colonies in southern African savannas. New approaches to mound excavation, sub-sampling and data man...
Article
Full-text available
In order to derive biomass estimates for Macrotermes natalensis (Hav.) (Isoptera: Termitidae) in the northern Kruger National Park, a statistical bootstrap procedure was carried out using three databases: body mass, colony population sizes and mound density. Live biomass (excluding king and queen) of M. natalensis for small, medium and large mounds...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports on the number of individuals in Macrotermes natalensis (Hav.) colonies of different sized mounds in the northern Kruger National Park. Mounds were fully excavated, termites collected by means of vacuuming, and colony size estimated by sub-sampling. The proportion of termites in the mound (above and underground sections) amounts t...
Article
Full-text available
This paper provides fundamental information on distribution and density of the genus Cubitermes, Wasm. quantified for future monitoring. After distribution trends have been established, changes in Cubitermes density over time can be brought into contention with other factors in the Kruger National Park, such as the impact of fire frequency, water d...
Article
Full-text available
At least ten 2 ha belt-transects were surveyed in each of the 20 northern landscape zones of the Kruger National Park. Termite mounds were recorded and activity within the termitaria was determined. Approximately 1.1 million active mounds occur in the northern KNP (approximately 47 % of all mounds in the area), with an average density of 1.1 active...
Data
Full-text available
Thesis
Full-text available
At least ten 2 ha belt-transects were undertaken in each of the 20 northern landscape zones of the Kruger National Park. Termite mounds encountered were recorded and their activity determined by means of digging. It is estimated that approximately 1,1 million active mounds occur in the northern K.N.P. (approximately 47 % of all active and inactive...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
It is well-known that terrestrial isopods are primary nutrient cyclers of woody litter and other vegetative debris, making them herbivorous detritivores. But perhaps they have stray diets under certain ecological conditions...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Project Isopoda NZ was initiated to address the shortcomings in the systematics of the terrestrial Isopoda of New Zealand - locally known as 'slaters'. Funding was kicked off by the JS Watson Conservation Trust for a pilot study, titled "Biodiversity and phylogeny of the Philosciidae and Armadillidae of terrestrial isopods (Crustacea, Isopoda, Oniscidea) from New Zealand" (2007). The need to revise NZ slaters grew and a significant boost in funding was granted by the TFBIS Biodiversity Information Fund (2011-2016), made possible through the efforts of Dr Maria (Masha) Minor of Massey University to, amongst other objectives, put a web key in place (http://nzslaters.massey.ac.nz). Additional funding to host oniscid specialist Prof. Stefano Taiti (CNR - Institute of Ecosystem Studies) from Florence, Italy, was generously provided by the Auckland War Memorial Museum, courtesy of entomology curator Dr John Early. This brief description in no way fully reflects the extensive preparations undertaken during the planning and proposal stages, as well as the subsequent progress reports submitted. The research is ongoing and a number of forthcoming papers will be published in peer-reviewed science journals over the course of time.