Víctor Arroyo-Rodríguez

Víctor Arroyo-Rodríguez
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México | UNAM · Instituto de Investigaciones en Ecosistemas y Sustentabilidad

Dr.

About

206
Publications
186,820
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8,364
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Introduction
Native from Madrid. Environmental Biologist (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid). Master and Doctor of Science (Instituto de Ecología A.C., Mexico). Postdoc at UNAM, Mexico. Full Researcher at UNAM since 2010. Member of the National Research System, top-level (III). UNAM Research Prize to Young Scientists (Natural Sciences). In our lab, we study the impact of land-use change on tropical plants and animals across different spatial scales - information of key relevance to inform conservation plans.
Additional affiliations
May 2018 - October 2018
Carleton University
Position
  • Sabbatical stay
November 2015 - December 2015
Federal University of Pernambuco
Position
  • Professor
November 2014 - December 2014
Federal University of Pernambuco
Position
  • Professor

Publications

Publications (206)
Article
Full-text available
Land-use change pushes biodiversity into human-modified landscapes, where native ecosystems are surrounded by anthropic land covers (ALCs). Yet, the ability of species to use these emerging covers remains poorly understood. We quantified the use of ALCs by primates worldwide, and analyzed species' attributes that predict such use. Most species use...
Article
Full-text available
Decades of research suggest that species richness depends on spatial characteristics of habitat patches, especially their size and isolation. In contrast, the habitat amount hypothesis predicts that: 1) species richness in plots of fixed size (species density) is more strongly and positively related to the amount of habitat around the plot than to...
Article
Full-text available
Agriculture and development transform forest ecosystems to human-modified landscapes. Decades of research in ecology have generated myriad concepts for the appropriate management of these landscapes. Yet, these concepts are often contradictory and apply at different spatial scales, making the design of biodiversity-friendly landscapes challenging....
Article
Full-text available
The legacy of the ‘SL > SS principle’, that a single or a few large habitat patches (SL) conserve more species than several small patches (SS), is evident in decisions to protect large patches while down-weighting small ones. However, empirical support for this principle is lacking, and most studies find either no difference or the opposite pattern...
Article
Full-text available
Landscape-scale deforestation poses a major threat to global biodiversity, not only because it causes habitat loss, but also because it can drive the degradation of remaining habitat. However, the multiple pathways by which deforestation directly and indirectly affects wildlife remains poorly understood, especially for elusive forest-dependent spec...
Article
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1. Landscape-level disturbances, such as forest loss, can profoundly alter the functional composition and diversity of biotic assemblages. In fact, the landscape-moderated functional trait selection (LMFTS) hypothesis states that landscape-level disturbances may act as environmental filters that select a set of species with disturbance-adapted attr...
Article
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Context. Biodiversity patterns depend on landscape structure, but the spatial scale at which such dependence is strongest (scale of effect, SoE) remains poorly understood, especially for elusive species such as arboreal tropical mammals. Objectives. To identify the SoE of arboreal mammals and assess whether it depends on the biological response and...
Article
Full-text available
Deforestation of old-growth forests (OGF) is a significant driver of biodiversity loss, particularly impacting rare species. However, the threat to dominant species is usually overlooked, given their relatively high abundance. Therefore, assessing the impact of forest loss on dominant species is imperative, mainly because they play critical roles i...
Chapter
Full-text available
Tropical forests are being rapidly deforested worldwide. The remaining forest is distributed in different-sized forest patches, but the species preservation value of small patches remains debated. Some studies suggest that edge effect can decrease forest-specialist species diversity, particularly in small patches, which are expected to be mainly oc...
Article
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The conservation of tropical biodiversity not only depends on forest remnants, but also on anthropogenic land covers. Some shade crops are considered wildlife-friendly agroecosystems, but their conservation value is context- and taxon-dependent. Amphibians and reptiles have received less attention despite their high sensitivity to habitat disturban...
Article
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Seed dispersal by animals can be negatively affected by selective logging, but this topic remains poorly understood. We investigated how selective logging impacts the quantity of seed dispersal, focusing on a highly frugivorous primate, Ateles geoffroyi yucatanensis, in Calakmul, Mexico. We assessed whether seed dispersal by the spider monkey diffe...
Article
Full-text available
Protected areas can prevent forest loss, but their effects on forest fragmentation and forest regrowth are poorly understood. Furthermore, the importance of protected areas in shaping these forest spatial changes may depend on different socioeconomic drivers (e.g. population size, distance to cities, proportion of local people working in non-farm o...
Article
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Forest ecosystems are increasingly threatened by unsustainable agricultural practices, especially by those that damage their regenerative potential. This can be the case of slash-and-burn agriculture – a farming method that can negatively impact the soil seed bank, potentially limiting the resilience of forest ecosystems. To test this hypothesis, a...
Article
Full-text available
ContextForest loss and fragmentation are rapidly expanding across the tropics. Although forest loss is a major driver of the current biodiversity crisis, the effect of fragmentation remains debated, particularly for forest-specialist species.Objectives We evaluated the univariate and combined effect of forest loss (percent of forest cover) and frag...
Article
Full-text available
Con la creciente pérdida y fragmentación de los ecosistemas naturales, entender cómo responden las especies a estos cambios nunca ha sido más urgente. Hoy existe consenso acerca del fuerte impacto negativo de la pérdida de hábitat sobre la biodiversidad. Sin embargo, el efecto de la fragmentación del hábitat ha sido muy debatido. En esta revisión,...
Article
Full-text available
We document the first verifiable records of Claudius angustatus Cope, 1865 in the Selva Lacandona, Chiapas, Mexico. Three individuals were observed in different types of anthropic land covers. These records are the most recent observations of C. angustatus in the southeastern zone of its range in more than 20 years, thus representing the southernmo...
Chapter
Landscape connectivity has a long history, with three distinct origins. Merriam connectivity (1984) is the interaction between a species’ movement attributes and the landscape structure, which influences movement rate between habitat patches and thereby, population persistence. Noss connectivity (1987) is the extent to which patches are connected t...
Article
The exploitation of non-timber forest products (NTFPs) has been encouraged in order to reconcile economic uses, biodiversity conservation and the provision of ecosystem services. In this paper we investigate how increments on the açaí palm density (Euterpe oleracea) via forest management change tree assemblages across 47 plots in the Amazon estuari...
Article
Understanding the factors and mechanisms shaping differences in species composition across space and time (β-diversity) in human-modified landscapes has key ecological and applied implications. This topic is, however, challenging because landscape disturbance can promote either decreases (biotic homogenization) or increases (biotic differentiation)...
Article
Aim Here we examine the functional profile of regional tree species pools across the latitudinal distribution of Neotropical moist forests, and test trait–climate relationships among local communities. We expected opportunistic strategies (acquisitive traits, small seeds) to be overrepresented in species pools further from the equator, but also in...
Article
Full-text available
Banks-Leite et al. (2021) claim that our suggestion of preserving ≥40% forest cover lacks evidence and can be problematic. We find these claims unfounded, and discuss why conservation planning urgently requires valuable, well-supported, and feasible general guidelines like the 40% criterion. Using region-specific thresholds worldwide is unfeasible...
Article
1. Land-use change threatens biodiversity in tropical landscapes, but its impact on forest regeneration remains poorly known. In fact, the landscape-scale patterns driving the diversity of regenerating plants within forest fragments have been rarely explored, and we are uncertain whether such drivers vary across regions with different land-use chan...
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity maintenance in human-modified landscapes largely depends on spatial variations in species composition (β-diversity), but the impact of human disturbance on β-diversity remains poorly understood. We examined how taxonomic and phylogenetic β-diversity of woody plant communities in the Brazilian Caatinga dry forest respond to two emerging...
Article
Full-text available
Deforestation has carved tropical forest landscapes into millions of different-sized patches worldwide. Research has focused on the effect of patch size on biodiversity, while neglecting patch quality effects and leaving geographic and interspecific variance to patch attributes largely unexamined. Here, we assess how patch size and quality affect t...
Article
Full-text available
Context Tropical forests are great reservoirs of carbon but they still suffer high rates of deforestation despite their importance. Yet, large uncertainty remains about the effects of landscape-level forest loss on biomass of forest remnants, and how these effects vary with disturbance intensity at larger regional scales. Objectives We evaluated w...
Article
Land use change is a major threat to species’ persistence. Yet, the landscape attributes that shape populations remain poorly understood. Landscape-scale forest cover and matrix quality can favor population persistence, while forest fragmentation per se usually has weak effects on species. The impact of these spatial changes can, however, be influe...
Preprint
Banks-Leite et al. (2021) claim that our suggestion of preserving ≥40% forest cover lacks evidence and can be problematic. We find these claims unfounded, and discuss why conservation planning urgently requires valuable, well-supported, and feasible general guidelines like the 40% criterion. Using region-specific thresholds worldwide is unfeasible...
Preprint
In biodiversity conservation, the “SL > SS principle” that a single (or few) large habitat patches (SL) conserve more species than several small patches (SS) is used to prioritize protection of large patches while down-weighting small ones. However, empirical support for this principle is lacking; most studies find SS > SL. We propose a research ag...
Article
Full-text available
Patch size is considered a major driver of species diversity in fragmented landscapes. Yet, assemblages of forest-dependent species, such as tropical arboreal mammals, can also depend on vegetation characteristics within the patch, i.e. patch quality. To test this, we assessed the influence of patch size and quality (measured through six attributes...
Article
Full-text available
Regenerating forests after agricultural land abandonment are increasingly common in human-modified tropical landscapes. These secondary forests preserve biodiversity and provide multiple ecosystem services, but such important roles depend on their recovery rates, which can be difficult to predict. Recovery is expected to occur faster when landscape...
Article
Full-text available
This study presents the floristic list of regenerating trees, shrubs and palms sampled in 60 tropical rainforests fragments in 3 different regions (n = 20 per region): Marqués de Comillas (Chiapas), Los Tuxtlas (Veracruz) and northern region of Chiapas. In each fragment, we recorded saplings in 25 8 m2-circular plots (200 m2 per fragment). In total...
Article
Full-text available
Fragmented tropical forests can be highly dynamic, with the spatial configuration of forest patches changing through time. Yet, the lack of longitudinal studies limits our understanding of how patch dynamics affect biodiversity, especially when there is a time lag in species extinctions (extinction debt). We assessed how temporal changes in patch s...
Article
Full-text available
Threats to biodiversity are well documented. However, to effectively conserve species and their habitats, we need to know which conservation interventions do (or do not) work. Evidence-based conservation evaluates interventions within a scientific framework. The Conservation Evidence project has summarized thousands of studies testing conservation...
Article
Full-text available
Context The role of protected areas as biodiversity repositories has become increasingly important in face of increased deforestation. By adding free-living exotic mammals, removing forest-dependent native ones, isolating forest patches from large protected areas and reducing landscape forest cover, human activities may drive mammal communities tow...
Article
Full-text available
Context Theoretical models propose that the spatial extent at which landscape structure best predicts species responses (scale of effect, SoE) depends on habitat and dietary specialization, landscape metrics, and response variables. However, empirical support for such models is scarce, especially for apex predators. Objectives To determine SoE for...
Article
Land-use change modifies the spatial structure of tropical landscapes, shaping global biodiversity patterns. Yet, it remains unknown how key ecological processes, such as seed dispersal, can be affected by changes in landscape patterns, and whether such effects differ among regions with different climate and disturbance intensity. We assessed the e...
Article
Habitat loss is the primary driver of biodiversity decline worldwide, but the effects of fragmentation (the spatial arrangement of remaining habitat) are debated. We tested the hypothesis that forest fragmentation sensitivity-affected by avoidance of habitat edges-should be driven by historical exposure to, and therefore species' evolutionary respo...
Chapter
Full-text available
Actividades productivas como la ganadería y la agricultura están promoviendo la expansión acelerada de paisajes antrópicos (PAs). Estos paisajes están compuestos por diferentes tipos de coberturas (e.g. vegetación nativa, cultivos, pastizales, asentamientos humanos), cada una de ellas con diferente geometría y arreglo espacial (e.g. número, tamaño,...
Article
Full-text available
Context: Non-human primates are among the most threatened mammals on Earth. Although some species, such as howler monkeys, are thought to be resistant to initial phases of habitat disturbance, the lack of longitudinal studies prevents determining if this holds over time. Objectives: We assessed temporal changes in landscape structure in the Lacand...
Article
Full-text available
Context Conversion of forest ecosystems to human-modified landscapes threatens the persistence of forest-specialist species. However, the local and landscape drivers of population abundance and genetic diversity of these species are largely unknown, especially for elusive and critically endangered species, such as the salamander Pseudoeurycea rober...
Article
Full-text available
Ecosystems largely depend, for both their functioning and their ecological integrity, on the ecological traits of the species that inhabit them. Non-human primates have a wide geographic distribution and play vital roles in ecosystem structure, function, and resilience. However, there is no comprehensive and updated compilation of information on ec...
Article
Full-text available
Context Landscape structure can affect seed dispersal, but the spatial scale at which such effect is maximized (scale of effect, SoE) is unknown. Objectives We assessed patterns and predictors of SoE on the seed rain in two Mexican regions: the relatively well-preserved Lacandona rainforest, and the more deforested Los Tuxtlas rainforest. We hypot...
Article
Land-use change modifies the spatial structure of terrestrial landscapes, potentially shaping the distribution, abundance and diversity of remaining species assemblages. Non-human primates can be particularly vulnerable to landscape disturbances, but our understanding of this topic is far from complete. Here we reviewed all available studies on pri...
Article
1. Tropical plant assemblages can be taxonomically and phylogenetically impoverished by chronic anthropogenic disturbance (CAD), such as firewood collection and extensive grazing. However, to what extent the functional dimension responds to CAD is still unclear. Such knowledge is urgently required for predicting, preventing or even reversing the im...
Article
Full-text available
Land-use change threatens a large number of tropical species (so-called ‘loser’ species), but a small subset of disturbance-adapted species may proliferate in human-modified landscapes (‘winner’ species). Identifying such loser and winner species is critically needed to improve conservation plans, but this task requires longitudinal studies that ar...
Article
Full-text available
1. Species recovery after forest disturbance is a highly studied topic in the tropics, but considerable debate remains on the role of secondary forests as biodiversity repositories, especially regarding the functional and phylogenetic dimensions of biodiversity. Also, studies generally overlook how alpha and beta diversities interact to produce gam...
Article
Full-text available
Study Description In a recently accepted article for publication in Ecological Applications, we observed that habitat simplification and fruit scarcity in highly deforested landscapes of Brazilian Atlantic forest limits the maintenance of forest-dependent frugivorous birds. Conversely, landscapes with higher forest edge amount showed higher diversi...
Article
Full-text available
Context Understanding population responses to landscape structure is critical to improve landscape planning. Yet, large uncertainty remains about how such responses vary among regions with different disturbance intensity. This knowledge is particularly important for forest-specialist species, such as spider monkeys. Objectives Assessing the effect...
Article
Temporarily available for free at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/1440-1703.1009 In the Anthropocene, many animal populations are increasingly confined to human- modified landscapes, in which different spatial variables describing landscape composition and configuration influence species persistence. Forest specialist species are...
Chapter
Full-text available
En este trabajo revisamos algunos modelos teóricos importantes y evidencias empíricas acerca del efecto de los cambios en la estructura del paisaje sobre los primates. Primero evaluamos el efecto de la composición del paisaje sobre los primates, incluyendo las variables que son más frecuentemente evaluadas (esto es, porcentaje de cobertura forestal...
Article
1. Our understanding of the structure and spatial organization of biological assemblages in human-modified tropical landscapes has critical importance to improve conservation actions. Investigations on this topic have been focused on local (α) diversity patterns, overlooking the changes in species turnover (β-diversity) between sites, and its conse...