Victor Anggono

Victor Anggono
The University of Queensland | UQ · Queensland Brain Institute

BSc (Hons), PhD

About

57
Publications
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Introduction
Research in the Anggono Lab aims to understand the molecular mechanisms underpinning synaptic transmission, plasticity, learning and memory, and how their dysregulations impact on the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases and neuropsychiatric disorders. Our research interests comprise 2 broad categories: 1. Neuronal Trafficking - The molecular basis of vesicles and receptors transports between sub-cellular compartments essential for neuronal communications, learning and memory. 2. Neuroepigenetics - The molecular mechanisms underlying activity-dependent gene transcription in synaptic plasticity, a cellular correlate of learning and memory.

Publications

Publications (57)
Article
Full-text available
Dynamin I is dephosphorylated at Ser-774 and Ser-778 during synaptic vesicle endocytosis (SVE) in nerve terminals. Phosphorylation was proposed to regulate the assembly of an endocytic protein complex with amphiphysin or endophilin. Instead, we found it recruits syndapin I for SVE and does not control amphiphysin or endophilin binding in rat synapt...
Article
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AMPA receptors (AMPARs) have recently been shown to undergo post-translational ubiquitination in mammalian neurons. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood and remain controversial. Here, we report that all four AMPAR subunits (GluA1-4) are rapidly ubiquitinated upon brief application of AMPA or bicuculline in cultured ne...
Article
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Efficient retrieval of synaptic vesicles (SVs) is crucial to sustain synaptic transmission. Protein interacting with C-kinase 1 (PICK1) is a unique PDZ (postsynaptic density-95/disc-large/zona-occluden-1)-and BAR (Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs)-domain-containing protein that regulates the trafficking of postsynaptic glutamate receptors. It is also expressed...
Article
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NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-dependent Ca²⁺ influx underpins multiple forms of synaptic plasticity. Most synaptic NMDAR currents in the adult forebrain are mediated by GluN2A-containing receptors, which are rapidly inserted into synapses during long-term potentiation (LTP); however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this stu...
Article
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Homeostatic synaptic scaling calibrates neuronal excitability by adjusting synaptic strengths during prolonged changes in synaptic activity. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) during synaptic scaling are largely unknown. Here, we show that chronic activity blockade reduces PICK1 protein level on a time...
Preprint
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Activity-dependent changes in the number of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) at the synapse underpin the expression of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), cellular correlates of learning and memory. Post-translational ubiquitination has emerged as a key regulator of the trafficking and surface expression of AMPARs, wi...
Article
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Most organisms respond to light. Here, we investigate the origin of metazoan phototransduction by comparing well-characterised opsin-based photosystems in neural animals with those in the sponge Amphimedon queenslandica. Although sponges lack neurons and opsins, they can respond rapidly to light. In Amphimedon larvae this is guided by the light-sen...
Article
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Axonal fusion is an efficient means of repair following axonal transection, whereby the regenerating axon fuses with its own separated axonal fragment to restore neuronal function. Despite being described over 50 years ago, its molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the Caenorhabditis elegans metalloprotease ADM-4,...
Preprint
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SFPQ is a nuclear RNA-binding protein that is involved in a wide range of physiological processes including neuronal development and homeostasis. However, the mislocalization and cytoplasmic aggregation of SFPQ are associated with the pathophysiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We have previously reported that zinc mediates SFPQ polymer...
Article
N6-methyladenosine or m⁶A modification to mRNAs is now recognised as a key regulator of gene expression and protein translation. The fate of m⁶A-modified mRNAs is decoded by m⁶A readers, mostly found in the cytoplasm, except for the nuclear-localised YTHDC1. While earlier studies have implicated YTHDC1–m⁶A functions in alternative splicing and mRNA...
Article
Activity-dependent gene expression and protein translation underlie the ability of neurons to dynamically adjust their synaptic strength in response to sensory experience and during learning. The emerging field of epitranscriptomics (RNA modifications) has rapidly shifted our views on the mechanisms that regulate gene expression. Among hundreds of...
Preprint
Full-text available
NMDAR-dependent Ca ²⁺ influx underpins multiple forms of synaptic plasticity. In the adult forebrain, the majority of synaptic NMDAR currents are mediated by GluN2A-containing NMDARs. These receptors are rapidly inserted into synapses during LTP; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that GluN2A is phos...
Article
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Excitatory neurotransmission relies on the precise targeting of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors to the neuronal plasma membrane. Activity-dependent ubiquitination of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunits sorts internalised receptors to late endosomes for degradation, which ultimately determines the numb...
Article
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Rare variants in GRIN genes, which encode NMDAR subunits, are strongly associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. Among these, GRIN2A, which encodes the GluN2A subunit of NMDARs, is widely accepted as an epilepsy-causative gene. Here, we functionally characterize the de novo GluN2A-S1459G mutation identified in an epilepsy patient. We show that...
Article
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Cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with dysregulation of the RNA and protein expression profiles in the brain. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of RNA post-transcriptional regulation (epitranscriptomics) in higher order brain functions. Specifically, N6-methyladenosine (m6A), which controls RNA stability, s...
Article
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SFPQ is a ubiquitous nuclear RNA-binding protein implicated in many aspects of RNA biogenesis. Importantly, nuclear depletion and cytoplasmic accumulation of SFPQ has been linked to neuropathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here, we describe a molecular mechanism by which SFPQ is mislocal...
Article
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The N‐methyl‐D‐aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are ionotropic glutamate receptors that mediate the flux of calcium (Ca2+) into the postsynaptic compartment. Calcium influx subsequently triggers the activation of various intracellular signaling cascades that underpin multiple forms of synaptic plasticity. Functional NMDARs are assembled as heterotetram...
Article
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Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a debilitating disease and the most common cause of dementia. As the world population ages even modest advances in therapies and preventative strategies would be of benefit. The specific physiological function of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) remains unclear despite strong genetic and biochemical evidence of APP in...
Article
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Schizophrenia has been associated with a range of genetic and environmental risk factors. Here we explored a link between two risk factors that converge on a shared neurobiological pathway. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified risk variants in genes that code for L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs), while epidem...
Article
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The synapse is a complex cellular module crucial to the functioning of neurons. it evolved largely through the exaptation of pre-existing smaller submodules, each of which are comprised of ancient sets of proteins that are conserved in modern animals and other eukaryotes. Although these ancient submodules themselves have non-neural roles, it has be...
Article
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Understanding the migration of newborn neurons within the brain presents a major challenge in contemporary biology. Neuronal migration is widespread within the developing brain but is also important within the adult brain. For instance, stem cells within the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) and the subgranular zone of dentate gyrus of the ad...
Article
What we already know about this topic: Syntaxin1A is a presynaptic molecule that plays a key role in vesicular neurotransmitter releaseMutations of syntaxin1A result in resistance to both volatile and intravenous anestheticsTruncated syntaxin1A isoforms confer drug resistance in cell culture and nematode models of anesthesia WHAT THIS ARTICLE TELL...
Article
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Abstract Clues from the epidemiology of schizophrenia, such as the increased risk in those born in winter/spring, have led to the hypothesis that prenatal vitamin D deficiency may increase the risk of later schizophrenia. We wish to explore this hypothesis in a large Danish case-control study (n = 2602). The concentration of 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25...
Article
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Research over the past decade has provided strong support for the importance of various epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA and histone modifications in regulating activity‐dependent gene expression in the mammalian central nervous system. More recently, the emerging field of epitranscriptomics revealed an equally important role of post‐transcript...
Article
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Genetic polymorphisms in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene have been strongly associated with obesity in humans. The cellular level of FTO is tightly regulated, with alterations in its expression influencing energy metabolism, food intake and body weight. Although the proteasome system is involved, the cellular mechanism underlying FTO...
Article
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Propofol is the most commonly used general anesthetic in humans. Our understanding of its mechanism of action has focused on its capacity to potentiate inhibitory systems in the brain. However, it is unknown whether other neural mechanisms are involved in general anesthesia. Here, we demonstrate that the synaptic release machinery is also a target....
Article
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The molecular mechanisms underlying plastic changes in the strength and connectivity of excitatory synapses have been studied extensively for the past few decades and remain the most attractive cellular models of learning and memory. One of the major mechanisms that regulate synaptic plasticity is the dynamic adjustment of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-m...
Article
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KCC2 is a neuron-specific K+-Cl- cotransporter essential for establishing the Cl- gradient required for hyperpolarizing inhibition in the central nervous system (CNS). KCC2 is highly localized to excitatory synapses where it regulates spine morphogenesis and AMPA receptor confinement. Aberrant KCC2 function contributes to human neurological disorde...
Article
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Alzheimer's disease is characterized by cognitive decline, neuronal degeneration, and the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ). Although, the neurotoxic Aβ peptide is widely believed to trigger neuronal dysfunction and degeneration in Alzheimer's disease, the mechanism by which this occurs is poorly defined. Here we describe a novel, Aβ-triggered apop...
Preprint
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KCC2 is a neuron-specific K ⁺ -Cl ⁻ cotransporter essential for establishing the Cl ⁻ gradient required for hyperpolarizing inhibition. KCC2 is highly localized to excitatory synapses where it regulates spine morphogenesis and AMPA receptor confinement. Aberrant KCC2 function contributes to numerous human neurological disorders including epilepsy a...
Article
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Transcription of new RNA is crucial for maintaining synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. Although the importance of synaptic plasticity-related messenger RNAs (mRNAs) is well established, the role of a large group of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in long-term potentiation (LTP) is not known. In this study, we demonstrated the expression of a...
Article
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The accumulation of soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides produces profound neuronal changes in the brain during the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Excessive levels of Aβ disrupt excitatory synaptic transmission by promoting the removal of synaptic AMPA receptors (AMPARs), dendritic spine loss, and synaptic depression. Recently, activity-dependent...
Article
Recycling of internalized receptors from endosomal compartments is essential for the receptors' cell-surface homeostasis. Sorting nexin 27 (SNX27) cooperates with the retromer complex in the recycling of proteins containing type I PSD95–Dlg–ZO1 (PDZ)-binding motifs. Here we define specific acidic amino acid sequences upstream of the PDZ-binding mot...
Article
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Dynamic trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) into and out of synapses plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. We previously reported that the protein kinase C and casein kinase II substrate in neurons (PACSIN) forms a complex with AMPARs through its interaction with the protein interacting with C-kinase 1 (PICK1) to regulate NMDA receptor...
Article
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Unlabelled: The RNA modification N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) influences mRNA stability and cell-type-specific developmental programming, and is highly abundant in the adult brain. However, it has not been determined whether m(6)A is dynamically regulated by experience. Based on transcriptome-wide profiling of m(6)A, we report that the level of m(...
Article
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Evidence from neuropathological, genetic, animal model, and biochemical studies has indicated that the accumulation of amyloid-beta (A β ) is associated with, and probably induces, profound neuronal changes in brain regions critical for memory and cognition in the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). There is considerable evidence that synapses...
Article
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Synaptic transmission relies on coordinated coupling of synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis and endocytosis. While much attention has focused on characterizing proteins involved in SV recycling, the roles of membrane lipids and their metabolism remain poorly understood. Diacylglycerol, a major signaling lipid produced at synapses during synaptic trans...
Article
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Alzheimer’s disease (AD) manifests as a progressive loss in memory, cognition, and language that is commonly associated with elevated levels of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide and hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain. There is currently no cure for AD as its causes remain poorly understood. Accumulating evidence suggests that synaptic dysfunction is a ma...
Article
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Activity-dependent changes in synaptic strength have long been postulated as cellular correlates of learning and memory. Long-term potentiation (LTP), a well characterized form of synaptic plasticity, is often expressed as an increase in the number of postsynaptic AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs). Although the precise molecular mechanisms gov...
Article
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NMDA receptor activation promotes endocytosis of AMPA receptors, which is an important mechanism underlying long-term synaptic depression. The pH-sensitive GFP variant pHluorin fused to the N terminus of GluA2 (pH-GluA2) has been used to assay NMDA-mediated AMPA receptor endocytosis and recycling. Here, we demonstrate that in somatic and dendritic...
Article
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The dynamic trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) into and out of synapses is crucial for synaptic transmission, plasticity, learning, and memory. The protein interacting with C-kinase 1 (PICK1) directly interacts with GluA2/3 subunits of the AMPARs. Although the role of PICK1 in regulating AMPAR trafficking and multiple forms of synaptic plastici...
Article
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Syndapin I (PACSIN 1) is a synaptically enriched membrane tubulating protein that plays important roles in activity-dependent bulk endocytosis and neuronal morphogenesis. While syndapin I is an in vitro phosphoprotein, it is not known to be phosphorylated in neurons. Here, we report the identification of two phosphorylation sites, S76 and T181, of...
Article
AMPA receptors (AMPARs) mediate the majority of fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain. Dynamic changes in neuronal synaptic efficacy, termed synaptic plasticity, are thought to underlie information coding and storage in learning and memory. One major mechanism that regulates synaptic strength involves the tightly regulated trafficking...
Article
Calcineurin is a phosphatase that is activated at the last known stage of mitosis, abscission. Among its many substrates, it dephosphorylates dynamin II during cytokinesis at the midbody of dividing cells. However, dynamin II has several cellular roles including clathrin-mediated endocytosis, centrosome cohesion and cytokinesis. It is not known whe...
Article
KIBRA has recently been identified as a gene associated with human memory performance. Despite the elucidation of the role of KIBRA in several diverse processes in nonneuronal cells, the molecular function of KIBRA in neurons is unknown. We found that KIBRA directly binds to the protein interacting with C-kinase 1 (PICK1) and forms a complex with α...
Article
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Glutamate receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) is a neuronal scaffolding protein that interacts directly with the C termini of glutamate receptors 2/3 (GluA2/3) via its PDZ domains 4 to 6 (PDZ4-6). We found an association (P<0.05) of a SNP within the PDZ4-6 genomic region with autism by genotyping autistic patients (n=480) and matched controls (n...
Article
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While AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) found at principal neuron excitatory synapses typically contain the GluR2 subunit, several forms of behavioral experience have been linked to the de novo synaptic insertion of calcium-permeable (CP) AMPARs, defined by their lack of GluR2. In particular, whisker experience drives synaptic potentiation as...
Article
Dynamin is a protein required for vesicle formation during synaptic vesicle endocytosis (SVE) and for clathrin-mediated endocytosis. It is part of a family of large guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases), including classical dynamins, dynamin-like protein, optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), and mitofusin. Dynamin readily self-assembles into rings and helices and...
Article
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Proteins containing PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) domains play key roles in the assembly and regulation of cellular signaling pathways and represent putative targets for new pharmacotherapeutics. Here we describe the first small-molecule inhibitor (FSC231) of the PDZ domain in protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) identified by a scr...
Article
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Synaptic vesicles (SVs) are retrieved by more than one mode in central nerve terminals. During mild stimulation, the dominant SV retrieval pathway is classical clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). During elevated neuronal activity, activity-dependent bulk endocytosis (ADBE) predominates, which requires activation of the calcium-dependent protein ph...
Chapter
IntroductionDistribution of Septins in BrainLocalization of Septins in NeuronsSubcellular Distribution of Septins in Nerve TerminalsRegulation of Septin Expression in BrainSeptin Filaments in BrainSynaptic Functions of SeptinsPhosphorylation of SeptinsSeptins and Neurodegenerative DiseaseConclusions References
Article
Neurons transmit information by exocytosis of synaptic vesicles (SV), which contain neurotransmitter. Exocytosis is followed by efficient retrieval of the plasma membrane by endocytosis to generate a new SV. SV retrieval supports multiple cycles of synaptic transmission. Over the years, styryl dyes have been widely used to probe the mechanism of SV...
Article
Dynamin I mediates vesicle fission during synaptic vesicle endocytosis (SVE). Its proline-rich domain (PRD) binds the Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain of a subset of proteins that can deform membranes. Syndapin I, amphiphysin I, and endophilin I are its major partners implicated in SVE. Syndapin binding is controlled by phosphorylation at Ser-774 and Se...
Article
Full-text available
Dynamin I (dynI) is phosphorylated in synaptosomes at Ser774 and Ser778 by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 to regulate recruitment of syndapin I for synaptic vesicle endocytosis, and in PC12 cells on Ser857. Hierarchical phosphorylation of Ser774 precedes phosphorylation of Ser778. In contrast, Thr780 phosphorylation by cdk5 has been reported as the sole...

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Projects (2)
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Project
Targeting KCC2 interacting partners to regulate function