Veronika Hyden-Hanscho

Veronika Hyden-Hanscho
Austrian Academy of Sciences (OeAW) | ÖAW · Institute of Modern and Contemporary Historical Research

Doctor of Philosophy

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12
Publications
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Introduction
Currently I work on a book project on the economic role of the nobility in the eighteenth century Habsburg monarchy. Historiography mostly explored the noble expenditures, however I focus on the revenues and where the money comes from. I scrutinize family book accounts and scrutinize the role of credit, borrowing, estate management, proto-industries and human resource management for successful economic management and income.

Publications

Publications (12)
Chapter
When in 1715 the Southern Netherlands passed formally into the hands of Vienna, one of the formerly wealthiest regions of northern Europe became a part of the Austrian Habsburg composite monarchy. For nearly 100 years, the Austrian Netherlands played an important role in the financial management of that Monarchy in the form of contributions, subsid...
Article
Full-text available
After 1648, the Habsburg nobility was, on the one hand, Catholic and loyal to the House of Habsburg, and enjoyed links to the Viennese court; and on the other, it was transterritorial and a fully-fledged member of the nobility of the Holy Roman Empire and European aristocratic culture. Caught between the dynastic antagonism between Bourbons and Hab...
Article
The annual fashion cycle of Louis XIV’s court was the starting point of the French domination and economic supremacy in Europe’s textile and fashion sector. This paper examines the specific circumstances under which French fashion captured the Viennese elite market despite the dynastical and political antagonism between the houses Habsburg and Bour...
Article
Early modern composite monarchies functioned by maintaining local rights and traditions and the successful accommodation of noble elites in the army, diplomatic corps, and regional governments. Scholars commonly focus on the integration of nobles from the core lands in order to implement a faithful civil service and reliable institutions for govern...
Book
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Über Jahrhunderte hinweg pflegte die in mehreren west- und zentraleuropäischen Ländern reich begüterte Adelsfamilie Arenberg ein Naheverhältnis zum Haus Habsburg. Der Band untersucht die wechselseitigen Verbindungen dieser hochadeligen Familie mit der Habsburgermonarchie auf unterschiedlichen Ebenen und im internationalen Kontext. Die Adelsfamilie...
Chapter
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In 1714 the treaties of Rastatt and Baden ceded the southern Netherlands to the Habsburg monarchy. The southern Netherlands were not contiguous to the rest of the monarchy and furthermore enjoyed their own distinct local rights and traditions. Early modern composite monarchies worked primarily through the intermediation of power between the soverei...
Chapter
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The two marriage alliances between the Arenbergs and the Upper Italian/Austrian family del Carretto in 1683 and 1684 broke with the Arenberg tradition of taking their spouses from the nobility of the southern Netherlands or the Holy Roman Empire. Though Otto Heinrich del Carretto was the Spanish governor ad interim of the Spanish Netherlands, he wa...
Chapter
Full-text available
The House of Arenberg was the most important, most prestigious and richest family of the high nobility in the Austrian Netherlands. Although the family was integrated in various ways into the structures of Austrian power, no marital connections to the Austrian aristocracy were contracted during the eighteenth century before 1781. Between that year...
Chapter
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The post-Napoleonic political system in the first half of the nineteenth century produced individual Arenberg family lines based in the various states including Belgium, Prussia, Hanover and France where the Arenberg family now possessed landed estates. However, the Arenbergs had never possessed significant links to the Hohenzollern and Welf dynast...
Article
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In the second half of the seventeenth century, the Viennese nobility introduced French fashion as a consumption pattern for Austrian elites. Beaver and vicuña hats, made of raw materials from Canada, Peru, West Africa, the Sudan and the Levant, were part and parcel of the new French fashion. French hats were globalized commodities appreciated throu...
Book
Full-text available
Trotz des politischen Antagonismus zwischen Paris und Wien orientierte sich der Wiener Adel ab dem 30-jährigen Krieg zunehmend an französischer Kultur, insbesondere am Repräsentationsmodell Ludwigs XIV. Der Adel initiierte durch zahlreiche Investitionen in französische Mode, Kosmetik, Innenraumgestaltung und repräsentative Karossen Kulturtransfer a...
Book
Cultural exchange and the emergence of consumer societies are two major fields of research for cultural historians. Former studies on cultural exchange focused on France and Continental Europe, similar to the history of consumption has been mainly studied with regards to the British Empire and the industrialization. In contrast to such a narrow sco...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Baroque castles, conspicuous consumption and prodigality were used in historiography to describe the nobility as the ruling social group in the early modern period. Literature on noble elites in the Habsburg monarchy likewise reflects such topics and topoi. This research project, funded by the Austrian Science Fund with an Elise Richter Fellowship, considers the nobility of the Habsburg monarchy as a driving force for economic development in the eighteenth century regarding both, the family itself and the monarchy. Due to the nobility’s privileged status, the aristocracy possessed the capital, the infrastructure and the manpower to invest in agriculture, industry, technology and banking. Income and family strategies diversified in the eighteenth century given that traditional fields of activity such as military service became less important. The IMET project will explore three major research questions: -Long-term family strategies in the economy that in the end increased income and risk management -Innovations and management strategies in agriculture, estate administration, industry, banking and joint stock companies in order to scrutinize the market orientation of nobles -The economic training and courses of education of nobles as a precondition of the professionalization of noble economic activity The IMET project is designed as a qualitative study. Selected families from different regions of the Habsburg monarchy will serve as objects of investigation. The accounts of the families’ general treasury, economic correspondence, instructions as well as travel itineraries are of particular interest. Examples from the Austrian Netherlands, from the Austro-Bohemian core lands and from Carinthia offer an interesting synopsis of economically strong regions of the eighteenth century Habsburg monarchy with important branches such as textiles, mining, trade and banking. In comparing these case-studies with other examples the project will help understanding noble engagement in the Habsburg economy.