Veronica Diveica

Veronica Diveica
Bangor University · School of Psychology

MSc Neuroimaging

About

12
Publications
1,600
Reads
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18
Citations
Citations since 2017
12 Research Items
18 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023024681012
2017201820192020202120222023024681012
2017201820192020202120222023024681012
2017201820192020202120222023024681012
Introduction
I am a doctoral student interested in how meaning is represented in the brain and retrieved in a flexible and context-appropriate way.
Additional affiliations
October 2019 - October 2022
Bangor University
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2018 - September 2019
Bangor University
Position
  • Master's Student
July 2018 - October 2018
Bangor University
Position
  • Research Intern
Description
  • Dr. Richard Binney's Laboratory - the Neuroscience of Social and Semantic Cognition
Education
October 2019 - October 2022
Bangor University
Field of study
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
September 2018 - September 2019
Bangor University
Field of study
  • Neuroimaging
September 2015 - July 2018
Bangor University
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (12)
Preprint
Full-text available
A key challenge for neurobiological models of social cognition is to elucidate whether brain regions are specialised for that domain. In recent years, discussion surrounding the role of the anterior temporal lobe (ATL) epitomises such debates; some argue it is part of a domain-specific network for social processing, while others claim it is a domai...
Article
Full-text available
The contribution and neural basis of cognitive control is under-specified in many prominent models of socio-cognitive processing. Important outstanding questions include whether there are multiple, distinguishable systems underpinning control and whether control is ubiquitously or selectively engaged across different social behaviours and task dema...
Preprint
Full-text available
concepts, like justice and friendship, are a central feature of our daily lives. Traditionally, abstract concepts are distinguished from other concepts in that they cannot be directly experienced through the senses. As such, they pose a challenge for strongly embodied models of semantic representation that assume a central role for sensorimotor inf...
Article
Full-text available
It has been proposed that social experience plays an important role in the grounding of concepts, and socialness has been proffered as a fundamental organisational principle underpinning semantic representation in the human brain. However, the empirical support for these hypotheses is limited by inconsistencies in the way socialness has been define...
Poster
Full-text available
The left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) has been associated with numerous cognitive domains, including executive control, language, semantics and social cognition. One possibility, therefore, is that IFG subregions will reveal multiple functional specialisations. However, the organisation of this region and the degree to which functional differentiat...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract concepts, like justice and friendship, are central features of our daily lives. Traditionally, abstract concepts are distinguished from other concepts in that they cannot be directly experienced through the senses. As such, they pose a challenge for strongly embodied models of semantic representation that assume a central role for sensorim...
Poster
Full-text available
Currently, there is a lack of consensus on whether brain regions involved in social processing are specialised for that domain or subserve a more general underlying function 1–5. Moreover, the extent to which domain-general systems contribute to social cognition remains unclear. Recently, it has been proposed that the semantic system involved in ex...
Article
Full-text available
A key challenge for neurobiological models of social cognition is to elucidate whether brain regions are specialised for that domain. In recent years, discussion surrounding the role of anterior temporal regions epitomises such debates; some argue the anterior temporal lobe (ATL) is part of a domain‐specific network for social processing, while oth...
Preprint
Full-text available
It has been proposed that social experience plays an important role in the grounding of concepts, and socialness has been proffered as a fundamental organisational principle underpinning semantic representation in the human brain. However, the empirical support for these hypotheses is limited by inconsistencies in the way socialness has been define...
Preprint
Full-text available
Most leading models of socio-cognitive processing devote little discussion to the nature and neuroanatomical correlates of cognitive control mechanisms. Recently, it has been proposed that the regulation of social behaviours could rely on brain regions specialised in the controlled retrieval of semantic information, namely the anterior inferior fro...
Poster
Full-text available
A core question for the cognitive sciences concerns how we flexibly interact with others and coordinate behaviour to achieve mutually beneficial outcomes. By modelling the cognitive processes underpinning neurotypical social interactions we may uncover clues as to the causes of social behavioural impairments that arise in the context of brain injur...
Poster
Full-text available
Many neurobiological accounts of the human ability to make mental state attributions (or theory or mind; TOM) posit a central role of the temporoparietal junction (TPJ)1, despite evidence from neuropsychology2 and functional neuroimaging3 that further suggests an important contribution from the anterior temporal lobes (ATL). A parallel set of liter...

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