Verena Vogler

Verena Vogler
Bauhaus-Universität Weimar · Chair of Computer Science in Architecture

Dr.- Ing.
Artificial coral reef design & Ecosystem-aware design approaches

About

8
Publications
1,882
Reads
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4
Citations
Introduction
Verena is a researcher at the Chair of Computer Science in Architecture at the Bauhaus- University Weimar and at McNeel Europe, the EU office of Robert McNeel & Associates, a software company that develops Rhino and Grasshopper. She developed a framework for artificial coral reef design to restore threatened tropical coral reefs in the Bali Sea using strategies from computational design, high precision underwater monitoring, and natural growth processes from corals. https://verenavogler.com/

Publications

Publications (8)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The tropical coral reef ecosystem is currently facing an unprecedented ecological crisis (HUGHES et al. 2017 & HARRIS et al. 2006), and it remains unclear how reef regeneration projects are progressing without efficient artificial reef designs that hold the long-term potential to become a fully integrated part of the coral reef ecosystem. As a resp...
Thesis
Full-text available
Tropical coral reefs, one of the world’s oldest ecosystems which support some of the highest levels of biodiversity on the planet, are currently facing an unprecedented ecological crisis during this massive human-activity-induced period of extinction. Hence, tropical reefs symbolically stand for the destructive effects of human activities on nature...
Experiment Findings
Full-text available
3D high precision point cloud models from underwater photogrammetry scans of artificial coral reef prototypes and of coral reefs. Available here: https://3d.artificialreefdesign.com/potree/reef/
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Urban areas are facing significant challenges regarding degradation of environments and ecosystems, species loss, and increased vulnerability to climate hazards, all of which impact negatively upon human health and well-being.Focusing on building envelopes can offer an effective approach to the regeneration of urban ecosystems, by providing new spa...
Presentation
Full-text available
The presentation shows visually the content of the submitted conference paper "Close range underwater photogrammetry for a high-resolution survey of a coral reef: A comparison between reconstructed 3-D point cloud models from still image and video data ". Basically, a natural coral reef has been scanned at close range using underwater photogrammet...

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
ECOlogical building enveLOPES: a game-changing design approach for regenerating urban ecosystems ECOLOPES is an innovative HORIZON 2020 funded research project proposing a radical change for city development: instead of minimizing the negative impact of urbanisation on nature, we aim at urbanisation to be planned and designed such that nature – including humans – can co-evolve within the city. We envisage a radically new integrated ecosystem approach to architecture that focuses equally on humans, plants, animals, and associated organisms such as microbiota. ECOLOPES will provide the technology that will help to achieve this vision. Urbanization constitutes a major environmental issue of the 21st century. Within cities, densification, the decrease of green open spaces, and a continued reliance on grey infrastructure approaches result in increasing separation of people from nature and decreased access to ecosystem services. This decreases the livability of cities and reduces human well-being. Current approaches fall short in providing breakthrough solutions, because they perpetuate the human-nature dichotomy due to anthropocentric design. In ECOLOPES we propose a radical change for city development: instead of minimizing the negative impact of urbanisation on nature, we aim at urbanization to be planned and designed such that nature – including humans – can co-evolve within the city. We envisage a radically new integrated ecosystem approach to architecture that focuses equally on humans, plants, animals, and associated organisms such as microbiota. Over the next few years, ECOLOPES will provide the technology that will help to achieve this vision. In ECOLOPES, we focus on the envelope, the building enclosure. We will transform the envelope into an ecolope, a multi-species living space for four types of inhabitants, humans, plants, animals, and microbiota. ECOLOPES will develop the core technologies for designing ecolopes in a systematic way, considering the needs of both humans, as well as of plants, animals and beneficial microbes. ECOLOPES will make biological knowledge available for the architectural design process, to find architectural solutions that enable synergies and limit conflicts between the inhabitants. The ecolopes designed by this multi-species approach will restore the beneficial human – nature relationships in cities. A key element of ECOLOPES will be an Information Model that integrates ecological and architectural knowledge, data and models into a data-integrated design recommendation system. The ECOLOPES Information Model will guide the development of the ECOLOPES Computational modelling and simulation environment, to make biological and architectural knowledge available for design. The ECOLOPES team is comprised of 6 partners, including TU Munich, TU Wien, University of Genoa, TECHNION, software technology company MCNEEL, and Studio Animal Aided Design. Project Coordinator Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Weisser Chair for Terrestrial Ecology Department of Ecology and Ecosystemmanagement Technische Universität München Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2 D-85350 Freising-Weihenstephan Project related Inquiries info@ecolopes.org Dissemination related Inquiries dissemination@ecolopes.org
Project
Integrating Computational Modelling and High Precision Monitoring Strategies for Artificial Coral Reefs – an Ecosystem-aware Design Approach in Times of Climate Change