Vasily Klucharev

Vasily Klucharev
National Research University Higher School of Economics | HSE · Faculty of Psychology

About

68
Publications
9,324
Reads
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1,609
Citations
Citations since 2016
45 Research Items
901 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140

Publications

Publications (68)
Article
Full-text available
In this study, we provide causal evidence that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) supports the computation of subjective value in choices under risk via its involvement in probability weighting. Following offline continuous theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (cTBS) of the DLPFC subjects (N = 30, mean age 23.6, 56% females) comple...
Article
Accumulating multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) results from fMRI studies suggest that information is represented in fingerprint patterns of activations and deactivations during perception, emotions, and cognition. We postulate that these fingerprint patterns might reflect neuronal-population level sparse code documented in two-photon calcium ima...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies have revealed types of eating nudges that can steer consumers toward choosing healthier options. However, most of the previously studied interventions target individual decisions and are not directed to changing consumers’ underlying perception of unhealthy food. Here, we investigate how a healthy eating call—first-person narrative b...
Article
Full-text available
Why do people often exhaust unregulated common (shared) natural resources but manage to preserve similar private resources? To answer this question, in this study we combine a neurobiological, economic, and cognitive modeling approach. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging on 50 participants, we show that a sharp decrease of common and privat...
Article
A number of neuromarketing studies employed brain responses called event-related potentials or ERPs as neural markers of brand associations. The use of the N400 component of ERPs in particular appeared to be the promising to study typicality of product-brand associations and their role for brand extension (Wang et al., 2012). The question, however,...
Article
Full-text available
Movies and narratives are increasingly utilized as stimuli in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetoencephalography (MEG), and electroencephalography (EEG) studies. Emotional reactions of subjects, what they pay attention to, what they memorize, and their cognitive interpretations are all examples of inner experiences that can differ...
Article
We used an eye-tracking technique to investigate the effect of green zones and car ownership on the attractiveness of the courtyards of multistorey apartment buildings. Two interest groups—20 people who owned a car and 20 people who did not a car—observed 36 images of courtyards. Images were digitally modified to manipulate the spatial arrangement...
Article
Full-text available
In addition to probabilities of monetary gains and losses, personality traits, socio-economic factors, and specific contexts such as emotions and framing influence financial risk taking. Here, we investigated the effects of joyful, neutral, and sad mood states on participants’ risk-taking behaviour in a simple task with safe and risky options. We a...
Article
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More than a decade of neuroimaging and brain stimulation studies point to a crucial role for the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (rDLPFC) in prosocial behavior. The intuitive prosociality model postulates that the rDLPFC controls intuitive prosocial behavior, whereas the reflective model assumes that the rDLPFC controls selfish impulses during...
Article
Full-text available
Value-based decision making in complex environments, such as those with uncertain and volatile mapping of reward probabilities onto options, may engender computational strategies that are not necessarily optimal in terms of normative frameworks but may ensure effective learning and behavioral flexibility in conditions of limited neural computationa...
Article
For over a decade, neuroimaging and brain stimulation studies have investigated neural mechanisms of third-party punishment, a key instrument for social norms enforcement. However, the neural dynamics underlying these mechanisms are still unclear. Previous electroencephalographic studies on third-party punishment have shown that inter-brain connect...
Article
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An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
Full-text available
Females demonstrate greater risk aversion than males on a variety of tasks, but the underlying neurobiological basis is still unclear. We studied how theta (4–7 Hz) oscillations at rest related to three different measures of risk taking. Thirty-five participants (15 females) completed the Bomb Risk Elicitation Task (BRET), which allowed us to measu...
Preprint
Full-text available
Females demonstrate greater risk aversion than males on a variety of tasks, but the underlying neurobiological basis is still unclear. We studied how theta (4-7 Hz) oscillations at rest related to three different measures of risk taking. Thirty-five participants (15 females) completed the Bomb Risk Elicitation Task (BRET), which allowed us to measu...
Article
Full-text available
People often change their beliefs by succumbing to an opinion of others. Such changes are often referred to as effects of social influence. While some previous studies have focused on the reinforcement learning mechanisms of social influence or on its internalization, others have reported evidence of changes in sensory processing evoked by social i...
Article
Full-text available
Both human and animal studies have demonstrated remarkable findings of experience-induced plasticity in the cortex. Here, we investigated whether the widely used monetary incentive delay (MID) task changes the neural processing of incentive cues that code expected monetary outcomes. We used a novel auditory version of the MID task, where participan...
Preprint
Full-text available
In games of incomplete information individual players make decisions facing a combination of structural uncertainty about the underlying parameters of the environment, and strategic uncertainty about the actions undertaken by their partners. How well are human actors able to cope with these uncertainties, and what models best describe their learnin...
Article
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Narratives, in the form of, e.g., written stories, mouth-to-mouth accounts, audiobooks, fiction movies, and media-feeds, powerfully shape the perception of reality and widely influence human decision-making. In this review, we describe findings from recent neuroimaging studies unraveling how narratives influence the human brain, thus shaping percep...
Preprint
Full-text available
Why do people often exhaust unregulated common (shared) natural resources but manage to preserve similar private resources? To answer this question, in the present work we combine a neurobiological, economic, and cognitive modeling approach. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging on 50 participants, we show that sharp depletion of common and p...
Chapter
Conformity is a form of social influence in which individuals align their attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors with other members of a group. Numerous neuroimaging findings support the hypothesis that human conformity is underlined by the basic (dopamine-related) learning mechanism: conflicts with a group opinion generate a “social” reward prediction...
Article
Full-text available
Numerous cognitive studies have demonstrated experience-induced plasticity in the primary sensory cortex, indicating that repeated decisions could modulate sensory processing. In this context, we investigated whether an auditory version of the monetary incentive delay (MID) task could change the neural processing of the incentive cues that code exp...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies have demonstrated that the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the right temporoparietal junction are causally involved in social norm compliance: its activation corresponds with the third-party norm enforcement behavior, known as third-party punishment. The current study aimed to address the inconsistencies in effects of brain...
Article
Full-text available
Competition for resources is a fundamental characteristic of evolution. Auctions have been widely used to model competition of individuals for resources, and bidding behavior plays a major role in social competition. Yet how humans learn to bid efficiently remains an open question. We used model‐based neuroimaging to investigate the neural mechanis...
Article
This paper assesses a number of contemporary neurophysiological and philosophical approaches to the problem of the existence of free will. We present arguments demonstrating the weakness of the positions of modern scientific schools maintaining conventional concepts of freedom of choice in humans. The paper demonstrates that the operation of stocha...
Preprint
Full-text available
Competition for resources is a fundamental characteristic of evolution. Auctions have been widely used to model competition of individuals for resources, and bidding behavior plays a major role in social competition. Yet how humans learn to bid efficiently remains an open question. We used model-based neuroimaging to investigate the neural mechanis...
Article
Full-text available
The functional role of high beta oscillations (20–35 Hz) during feedback processing has been suggested to reflect unexpected gains. Using a novel gambling task that separates gains and losses across blocks and directly compares reception of monetary rewards to a ‘no-reward/punishment’ condition with equal probability we aimed to further investigate...
Article
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Reflecting the discrepancy between received and predicted outcomes, the reward prediction error (RPE) plays an important role in learning in a dynamic environment. A number of studies suggested that the feedback-related negativity (FRN) component of an event-related potential, known to be associated with unexpected outcomes, encodes RPEs. While FRN...
Article
Modern neuroimaging studies begin to explore neurobiological mechanisms of social norms enforcement. Several regions of frontal lobes and temporo-parieto-occipital cortex play a key role in decision making of social punishment of fairness' norm violation. The cutting-edge methods of brain stimulation allow to change frequency and intensity of socia...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, we investigated the effect of transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) on voluntary risky decision making and executive control in humans. Stimulation was delivered online at 5 Hz (θ), 10 Hz (α), 20 Hz (β), and 40 Hz (γ) on the left and right frontal area while participants performed a modified risky decision-making task....
Article
Full-text available
Cognitive dissonance theory suggests that our preferences are modulated by the mere act of choosing. A choice between two similarly valued alternatives creates psychological tension (cognitive dissonance) that is reduced by a postdecisional reevaluation of the alternatives. We measured EEG of human subjects during rest and free-choice paradigm. Our...
Article
Full-text available
Humans often adjust their opinions to the perceived opinions of others. Neural responses to a perceived match or mismatch between individual and group opinions have been investigated previously, but some findings are inconsistent. In this study, we used magnetoencephalographic source imaging to investigate further neural responses to the perceived...
Article
Full-text available
The paper discusses modern neuroscientific and philosophical approaches in studies of free will. Author demonstrates weaknesses of the arguments supporting the tradition view on free will. Both a stochasticity of neural processes and top-down neural regulation do not assume a freedom of choice. © 2017 Maik Nauka-Interperiodica Publishing. All right...
Preprint
Full-text available
The decision-making process is exposed to modulatory factors, and, according to the expected value (EV) concept the two most influential factors are magnitude of prospective behavioural outcome and probability of receiving this outcome. The discrepancy between received and predicted outcomes is reflected by the reward prediction error (RPE), which...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Every day we face not only certain risks, but also risky and non-risky decisions of people surrounding us. How do we make our decision to take risk or not? Do we gain extra utility from favorable payoff comparison or from conforming to the decisions of others? We test social conformity in decisions under risk using independent lotteries, therefore,...
Article
Reward prediction error (RPE) reflects the discrepancy between received and predicted outcomes and therefore plays an important role in learning in a dynamic environment. Using electroencephalographic measures of response to obtained and expected outcomes, previous studies have suggested that feedback-related negativity (FRN) could code RPE. It has...
Article
Our decisions are affected not only by objective information about the available options but also by other people. Recent brain imaging studies have adopted the cognitive neuroscience approach for studying the neural mechanisms of social influence. A number of studies have shown that social influence is associated with neural activity in the medial...
Article
To choose optimally, people must consider both the potential value and the probability of a desired outcome. This idea is reflected in the expected value theory, which considers both the potential value of different courses of action and the probability that each action will lead to a desired outcome. Accordingly, during decision-making people choo...
Article
Full-text available
Informational cascades can occur when rationally acting individuals decide independently of their private information and follow the decisions of preceding decision-makers. In the process of updating beliefs, differences in the weighting of private and publicly available social information may modulate the probability that a cascade starts in a dec...
Article
Full-text available
Humans often change their beliefs or behavior due to the behavior or opinions of others. This study explored, with the use of human event-related potentials (ERPs), whether social conformity is based on a general performance-monitoring mechanism. We tested the hypothesis that conflicts with a normative group opinion evoke a feedback-related negativ...
Article
Full-text available
We often change our behavior to conform to real or imagined group pressure. Social influence on our behavior has been extensively studied in social psychology, but its neural mechanisms have remained largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that the transient downregulation of the posterior medial frontal cortex by theta-burst transcranial magnetic sti...
Article
We often change our decisions and judgments to conform with normative group behavior. However, the neural mechanisms of social conformity remain unclear. Here we show, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, that conformity is based on mechanisms that comply with principles of reinforcement learning. We found that individual judgments of facia...
Article
Full-text available
Bekende personen worden vaak ingehuurd voor reclamecampagnes. In dit onderzoek laten we zien dat een hoge gepercipieerde deskundigheid van de bekende persoon voor het product, sterk kan bijdragen aan het succes van dergelijke campagnes. Een expert zorgt zowel voor een beter geheugen voor het aangeprezen product als een hogere koopintentie. Met de t...
Article
Celebrity endorsement is omnipresent. However, despite its prevalence, it is unclear why celebrities are more persuasive than (equally attractive) non-famous endorsers. The present study investigates which processes underlie the effect of fame on product memory and purchase intention by the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging methods. We f...
Article
Full-text available
Human behaviour is affected by various forms of persuasion. The general persuasive effect of high expertise of the communicator, often referred to as 'expert power', is well documented. We found that a single exposure to a combination of an expert and an object leads to a long-lasting positive effect on memory for and attitude towards the object. U...
Article
We examined how emotional context influences processing of emotionally neutral acoustic stimuli in the human auditory cortex. Nine subjects performed a simple discrimination task. In the positive-emotional trials correct performance was awarded with money, whereas in the negative-emotional trials, correct performance resulted in avoidance of the lo...
Article
The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of short-term repetitive electrical stimulation (rES training session) on the motor-evoked hemodynamic responses. The fMRI echo-planar images (EPI) were recorded before and after the rES training. The right median nerve (MN) was stimulated during rES. The rES training resulted in a significant...
Article
This study aimed at determining how the human brain automatically processes phoneme categories irrespective of the large acoustic inter-speaker variability. Subjects were presented with 450 different speech stimuli, equally distributed across the [a], [i], and [u] vowel categories, and each uttered by a different male speaker. A 306-channel magneto...
Article
Event related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from 11 subjects watching photographs of angry and happy faces with different gaze directions. ERPs to right averted gaze differed from those to straight and left averted gaze at 85 and 460 ms whereas ERPs to happy and angry expressions differed at 115, 330 and 380 ms. We suggest that short-latency effe...
Article
We studied the interactions in neural processing of auditory and visual speech by recording event-related brain potentials (ERPs). Unisensory (auditory - A and visual - V) and audiovisual (AV) vowels were presented to 11 subjects. AV vowels were phonetically either congruent (e.g., acoustic /a/ and visual /a/) or incongruent (e.g., acoustic /a/ and...
Article
Earlier studies have indicated that patients claiming to be sensitive to electromagnetic fields, so-called electrical hypersensitivity (EHS), have a dysbalance of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) regulation. This paper focuses on a possible dysbalance in the ANS among EHS patients by the use of long-term monitoring of electrocardiogram (ECG) in b...
Article
Full-text available
Identification of emotional expressions of a Talking Head (TH) were evaluated and compared to that of natural faces. In addition, the effect of static (pictures) and dynamic (video sequences) stimuli was studied. Natural stimuli consisted of six basic emotional expressions (anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness and surprise). Two expression sets...
Article
In the present pilot study we have investigated the effects of computer monitor jitter induced by an external magnetic field on the video display unit (VDU) user's performance in reading and search–highlight tasks, as well as on the heart rate (HR). Additionally, attention and short-term memory were tested before and after VDU work under different...

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Projects (4)
Project
Neuroscience & Art projeсt: international online conference “Neurotechnology and Freedom” to be held on March 18, 16.00 - 22.00 (GMT+3, Moscow Time). New neurotechnologies allow not only to improve and repair brain function, but effectively manipulate human behavior. The main subject of the interdisciplinary discussion is the impact of neurotechnology on human rights and freedoms. What are the social, cultural and economical consequences of the quickly growing neurotech? Can the uncontrolled collection of brain data (e.g. using brain-computer interfaces) violate our freedom? Scientists, philosophers, researchers of art and artists will take part in the discussion about the impact of neurotech on the freedom of human beings. We invite you to join the discussion! Professor Patrick Haggard, a neuroscientist at University College London suggests that people have the strong belief that we make choices about what we do and that our conscious decisions initiate our actions, at least on some occasions. At the same time, our actions are clearly the result of a causal chain of neuronal activity in premotor and motor areas of the brain. Patrick Haggard declared, “We certainly don’t have free will. Not in the sense we think.” The participants of the event: - Prof. Patrick Haggard (UCL, UK); - Prof. Dr. Gabriel Curio (Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany); - Prof. Risto Ilmoniemi (Aalto University, Finland); - Prof. Danil Razeev (Saint Petersburg University, Russia); - Dr. Suzanne Dikker (NYU Max Planck Center for Language, Music, and Emotion, USA); - Prof. Vasily Klucharev (Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience HSE, Russia); - Dr. Ksenia Fedorova (Leiden University, the Netherlands); - Dr. Ippolit Markelov (ITMO University, «18 Apples», Russia); - Prof. Mikhail Lebedev (Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience HSE, Russia and Skoltech, Russia); - Dr. Vadim Nikulin (Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Germany, and Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience HSE, Russia); - Dr. Maria Nazarova (Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience HSE, Russia, and Centre for Brain Research and Neurotechnologies, FMBA, Russia); - Dr. Pia Tikka, (Tallinn University, Estonia). Organized by the Centre for Cognition & Decision Making, Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience HSE, and supported by I-Brain Erasmus+ project. All participants are welcome to register to the online event completing the registration form at the following link: https://www.hse.ru/en/polls/448688339.html Website: https://neuroscienceart.org/
Archived project
The main goal is to discover the presence and properties of the economic component of “sociality” in decision making under risk and uncertainty.