Vanessa Clare Bowman

Vanessa Clare Bowman
Jesus College, Cambridge

Ph.D., B.Sc.(Hons) Geology

About

42
Publications
11,240
Reads
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1,041
Citations
Introduction
Current project: Impact of global disturbances on the evolution of life in the polar regions during the early Cenozoic (PALEOPOLAR), NERC Long-term Co-evolution of Life and the Planet research programme [Award NE/100582X/1] Past projects: Terminal Cretaceous climate change and biotic response in Antarctica, NERC Antarctic Funding Initiative [Award NE/C506399/1] Antarctic vegetation and climate during ice sheet development, New Zealand Foundation for Research Science and Technology Fellowship
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - present
Jesus College, Cambridge
Jesus College, Cambridge
Position
  • Administrator
October 2013 - present
British Antarctic Survey
Position
  • Palynologist
June 2005 - September 2013
University of Leeds
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
Full-text available
Debate continues about the nature of the Cretaceous–Paleogene (K–Pg) mass extinction event. An abrupt crisis triggered by a bolide impact contrasts with ideas of a more gradual extinction involving flood volcanism or climatic changes. Evidence from high latitudes has also been used to suggest that the severity of the extinction decreased from low l...
Article
Full-text available
The Paleocene (66–56 Ma) was a critical time interval for understanding recovery from mass extinction in high palaeolatitudes when global climate was warmer than today. A unique sedimentary succession from Seymour Island (Antarctic Peninsula) provides key reference material from this important phase of the early Cenozoic. Dinoflagellate cyst data f...
Article
Full-text available
Fluctuations in Late Cretaceous climate were already influencing biotic change prior to the environmental upheaval at the Cretaceous – Paleogene (K–Pg) boundary, but their general nature, magnitude and timing remain controversial. A high-resolution dataset on terrestrially-derived palynomorphs is presented from the high southern palaeolatitudes tha...
Article
Full-text available
The Late Cretaceous is considered to have been a time of greenhouse climates, although evidence from Maastrichtian sediments for rapid and significant sea-level changes suggests that ice sheets were growing and decaying on Antarctica at that time. There is no direct geological evidence for glaciation, but we present palynomorph records from Seymour...
Article
Full-text available
The first exciting clues that Antarctica had not always been ice-covered were the leaf fossils of Glossopteris plants that Scott’s party brought back from the Beardmore Glacier region in 1912. Since dated at ~ 250 million years old, it has become evident that Antarctica has been vegetated longer than it has been ice-covered. These first plant fossi...
Article
Full-text available
Taxonomic and ecological recovery from the Cretaceous–Palaeogene (K–Pg) mass extinction 66 million years ago shaped the composition and structure of modern ecosystems. The timing and nature of recovery has been linked to many factors including palaeolatitude, geographical range, the ecology of survivors, incumbency and palaeoenvironmental setting....
Preprint
One of the most expanded records to contain the final fortunes of ammonoid cephalopods is within the López de Bertodano Formation of Seymour Island, James Ross Basin, Antarctica. Located at ~65º South now, and during the Cretaceous, this sequence is the highest southern latitude onshore outcrop containing the Cretaceous–Paleogene (K–Pg) transition....
Conference Paper
BioBlitz events involve intense, usually time-limited, surveys of modern ecosystems undertaken by scientists and volunteers in a joint effort to document local biodiversity. This is used as a vehicle to engage members of the public in issues pertaining to their local environment, as well as a means of employing ‘citizen science’ to efficiently gath...
Article
Full-text available
The extensive Late Cretaceous – Early Paleogene sedimentary succession of Seymour Island, N.E. Antarctic Peninsula offers an unparalleled opportunity to examine the evolutionary origins of a modern polar marine fauna. Some 38 modern Southern Ocean molluscan genera (26 gastropods and 12 bivalves), representing approximately 18% of the total modern b...
Article
One of the most expanded records to contain the final fortunes of ammonoid cephalopods is within the López de Bertodano Formation of Seymour Island, James Ross Basin, Antarctica. Located at ~ 65° South now, and during the Cretaceous, this sequence is the highest southern latitude onshore outcrop containing the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K–Pg) transition...
Article
Full-text available
Constraining past fluctuations in global temperatures is central to our understanding of the Earth's climatic evolution. Marine proxies dominate records of past temperature reconstructions, whereas our understanding of continental climate is relatively poor, particularly in high-latitude areas such as Antarctica. The recently developed MBT/CBT (met...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding past environments is key to making predictions about future changes in the Earth System that may affect humanity. Since the 1980s, environmental groups have been increasingly active in raising awareness about human-induced global warming or, more accurately, climate change. This is largely due to the continual worldwide burning of fos...
Article
The vegetation of Antarctica through geological timeD.J. & PooleI.Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2012 ISBN:978-0-521-85598-3 (Hardcover), 480 pp. £85.00. - Volume 26 Issue 2 - Vanessa Bowman
Article
Full-text available
Development of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) during the Cenozoic is controversial in terms of timing and its role in major climate transitions. Some propose that the development of the ACC was instrumental in the continental scale glaciation of Antarctica and climate cooling at the Eocene/Oligocene boundary. Here we present climate model...
Article
Full-text available
Small chorate dinoflagellate cysts are common in Upper Cretaceous to Quaternary sedimentary successions around the Antarctic margin. Taxonomic confusion surrounding dinoflagellate cysts and acritarchs of similar morphology throughout the southern high palaeolatitudes has hitherto limited investigation of their palaeoecological significance. This st...
Article
The thickest uppermost Cretaceous to lowermost Paleogene (Maastrichtian to Danian) sedimentary succession in the world is exposed on southern Seymour Island (65° South) in the James Ross Basin, Antarctic Peninsula. This fossiliferous shallow marine sequence, which spans the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary, has allowed a high-resolution analysis of we...
Article
This study of the Maastrichtian (latest Cretaceous, 71–65 Ma) species of Manumiella Bujak and Davies 1983 in the James Ross Basin, Antarctic Peninsula is focussed on the biostratigraphical and palaeoecological significance of this peridinioid dinoflagellate cyst genus, in particular with reference to oceanic changes associated with the Cretaceous/T...
Article
The change from a warm, ice-free greenhouse world to the glacial Antarctic icehouse occurred during the latest Eocene–earliest Oligocene. Prior to this, during the Early–Middle Eocene, Antarctica experienced warm climates, at least on the margins of the continent where geological evidence is present. Climates appear to have been warm and wet, the s...
Article
Full-text available
Phytoliths in the modern vegetation of sub-Antarctic Campbell Island are compared with those in the soil beneath to assess the accuracy of vegetation reconstructions made from dispersed phytolith assemblages. The soil phytoliths alone suggest the source vegetation is a grassland association for all study sites, which reflects none of the herb, fern...
Data
Full-text available
The evolution of Antarctic climate from a Cretaceous greenhouse into the Neogene icehouse is captured within a rich record of fossil leaves, wood, pollen and flowers from the Antarctica Peninsula and the Transantarctic Mountains. About 85 million years ago, during the mid-Late Cretaceous, flowering plants thrived in sub-tropical climates in Antarct...
Article
Latest Cretaceous to early Palaeogene climates in Antarctica are being investigated from an exceptional sedimentary sequence on Seymour Island (James Ross Basin, Antarctic Peninsula) to determine the nature of climate change at the end of the Cretaceous. It has been suggested that, following peak mid Cretaceous warmth, cooling during the Maastricht...
Article
With increasing interest in climate change and other issues associated with the history of the environment and anthropogenic evolution there is an ongoing requirement to investigate the Earth's natural systems. A key approach is for scientists to look back into geological time, perhaps millions of years, to see how the world has reacted to natural...
Article
Phytoliths are microscopic particles of opaline silica (SiO2.nH2O) formed by the accumulation and solidification of siliceous gel between and within the cells of many plants. Soil surface phytolith assemblages are assessed for their potential to accurately reconstruct the overlying vegetation community within the subalpine zone of Tongariro Nationa...
Article
The Upper Miocene (10.7–9.0 Ma) Battye Glacier Formation was deposited ∼250 km inland from the modern Amery Ice Shelf edge in Prydz Bay, East Antarctica. The composition of clay minerals distinguishes a Lower Member, which reflects regional erosion of Precambrian metamorphic basement, from an Upper Member, which records increased erosion of local P...
Article
Simulated climate for the Antarctic continent using the GENESIS (Version 2.1) Global Climate Model with 34 Ma boundary conditions is shown to be highly sensitive to polar vegetation type. Six experiments were run using different levels of atmospheric CO2, orbital configurations, ice sheet geometries and vegetation types to assess model sensitivity...
Data
The site for CRP-3, 12 km east of Cape Roberts (77.006°S; 103.719°E)was selecte to overlap the lower Oligocene strata cored in nearby CRP-2/2A, and to sample the oldest strata in the Victoria Land Basin (VLB) for Paleogene climatic and tectonic history. As it transpired there was underlap of the order of 10s of metres. CRP-3 was cored from 3 to 939...
Article
A Middle Jurassic fossil forest, thought to have been growing at high southern palaeolatitudes on the Gondwana margin, is described from New Zealand. Fossil stump horizons are exposed in stratigraphic section within the Urawitiki Measures Formation, Murihiku Supergroup. Tree bases were preserved by silica permineralisation in a sandy braided river...
Article
Phytolith (plant opal) production, and its preservation within the soil surface, is described for the first time in the subantarctic region from Campbell Island, ca. 600 km south of New Zealand, forming the basis for a new modern reference collection for the region. Plant samples (many from species endemic to the island and vegetation community dom...
Article
Preliminary phytolith analysis of ephemeral lake fill sediment at Long Pocket, near Toomba, northeast Queensland, Australia, indicates that a C4-dominated grassland with a minor woody component has been present in the region since ca. 8000 cal yr B.P. Based on the modern distribution of C4 and C3 native grasses in Australia, this suggests that mean...
Article
Rare phytoliths are described from Late Cretaceous to Quaternary deep-sea sediments from Sites 1165 and 1166, Prydz Bay, East Antarctica. The phytoliths are comparable to modern tree/shrub, grass, and fern forms, although some may be modern contaminants. Spherical tree/shrub phytoliths are the most common, occurring particularly in the lower middle...
Article
Fossil evidence of a high southern palaeolatitude (approximately 75–78° South) Middle Jurassic (Temaikan) forest from Gondwana is investigated from the Murihiku Supergroup exposed at Kawhia Harbour, North Island, New Zealand. Horizons of fossilised tree stumps, preserved in growth position and rooted within coal-rich layers at bedding contacts, are...
Article
Full-text available
Phytoliths (siliceous plant microfossils) have been recovered from Cenozoic sediments (c. 34 to 17 Ma) in the CRP-2/2A and CRP-3 drillholes cored off Cape Roberts, Victoria Land Basin, Antarctica. The phytolith assemblages are sparse, but well-preserved and dominated by spherical forms similar to those of modern trees or shrubs. Rare phytoliths com...
Thesis
Middle Jurassic fossil forest deposits from New Zealand, at a palaeolatitude of ~75-78 [degrees] South, provide evidence for a diverse vegetation association dominated by Filicopsida and Gymnospermopsida plants. Macrofloral and microfloral studies at present day Kawhia Harbour (North Island) and in the Curio Bay region (South Island) also recognise...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Biostratigraphy, palaeoclimate, palaeoenvironment, palaeoecology, vegetation reconstruction, stratigraphy, sedimentology