Valter Amaral

Valter Amaral
MARE-Universidade de Lisboa (Portugal) & Macquarie University (Australia)

23.82
 · 
Ph.D.

About

21
Publications
1,514
Reads
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276
Citations
Introduction
My primary research goals are directed towards combining ecological and molecular tools to understand the response of marine and coastal organisms and ecosystems to global changes, such as broad scale climatic changes. I develop postdoctoral research at University of Lisbon (Portugal) and Macquarie University. My PhD was on environmental constraints on crab populations (University of Lisbon and Marine Biological Association UK, 2008). I graduated in Biology from University of Lisbon, 2001.
Research Experience
January 2009 - present
Macquarie University
Position
  • Visiting Associate
October 2008 - present
Centro de Oceanografia
Position
  • PostDoc fellow
January 2003 - June 2008
Marine Biological Association of the UK
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
January 2003 - July 2008
University of LIsbon & Marine Biological Association of the UK
Field of study
  • Marine Biology and Aquaculture
September 1996 - September 2001
Faculty of Science, University of Lisbon
Field of study
  • Biology Applied to Marine Animal Resources

Publications

Publications (21)
Chapter
Full-text available
El "Primer", o “Principios de la Restauración Ecológica (RE)”, publicado en 2004, es el documento de referencia de la disciplina. Resume el paradigma y establece el marco conceptual, objetivos, y definiciones. El planteo de ecosistemas de referencia, la distinción entre RE y ecología de la restauración (la práctica y la ciencia), o la identificació...
Article
Correction for 'The biology of environmental stress: molecular biomarkers in Sydney rock oysters (Saccostrea glomerata)' by D. A. Raftos et al., Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2016, 18, 1129-1139.
Article
This review describes our recent work on environmental stress in Sydney rock oysters, focusing on the identification of molecular biomarkers for ecotoxicological analysis. We begin by describing the environmental pressures facing coastal estuaries in Australia, with particular reference to Sydney Habour. After providing that context, we summarise o...
Article
This study tested the proteomic responses of three spatially distinct Sydney rock oyster populations to elevated pCO 2. Oysters were collected from environmentally different sites, two chronically affected by acid sulfate soil. Oysters from each of the three populations were exposed to ambient (380 matm) or elevated (856 and 1500 matm) pCO 2 for 4...
Article
Phenotypic plasticity may be critical to the maintenance of viable populations under future environmental change. Here we examined the role of behavioural avoidance of sub-optimal conditions in enabling the intertidal gastropod, Bembicum auratum, to persist in mangrove forests affected by the low pH run-off from acid sulfate soils (ASS). Behavioura...
Article
Oyster populations periodically exposed to runoff from acid sulfate soils (ASS) are of depressed abundance and have fewer smaller individuals than unaffected populations, despite having similar recruitment levels to unaffected sites during dry periods. We examined how the timing and duration of exposure to ASS runoff influences the growth and survi...
Article
Short-term experiments exposing calcifying organisms to acidification have revealed altered growth and strength of their exoskeletons. We tested the hypothesis that multi-generational exposure to sustained estuarine acidification from runoff from acid sulphate soils (ASS) would: (1) reduce the shell strength of sessile or relatively immobile wild b...
Article
Full-text available
Runoff from acid sulfate soils (ASS) has severe environmental and economic impacts on estuarine ecosystems. Oysters display reduced abundance, growth rate and shell thickness when exposed to ASS runoff, yet the molecular underpinnings of their responses have not been explored. We hypothesised that the proteomes of wild Sydney rock oysters, Saccostr...
Article
Acid sulphate soils (ASS), which occur on floodplains worldwide, pose a significant threat to estuarine ecosystems. In laboratory and field experiments, naÔve calcifying organisms that are exposed for even short periods (1-2 mo) to runoff from ASS suffer 80% mortality and slowed growth. Based on these observations we expected that sampling of wild...
Article
Runoff from acid-sulphate soils (ASS) is increasingly threatening the structure and function of estuarine ecosystems worldwide. Along the east coast of Australia, sulphuric acid is known to affect the growth and survival of mangrove saplings, but impacts of ASS runoff on the structure and function of established mangrove trees are unclear. Pneumato...
Article
Cannibalism is a potentially important factor in the regulation of populations in a range of habitats. The intensity of this biotic factor may be determined by both intra and interspecific interactions. Cancer pagurus and Porcellana platycheles are two co-occurring decapods on Atlantic rocky shores. In laboratory mesocosms, we investigated intra an...
Article
Constructed wetlands, especially mangroves, have been studied for their usefulness in sewage treatment but the effects of mangrove vegetation and a sewage load on mangrove macrofauna have been given little attention. Ocypodid crabs are important components of mangrove forests and constitute good bioindicators of the functioning of the ecosystem as...
Article
Estuarine and nearshore marine areas are vital habitats for several fish and benthic invertebrates. The shore crab Carcinus maenas (Crustacea: Brachyura: Portunidae) inhabits a variety of coastal, estuarine and lagoon habitats. At low tide, habitat structural complexity may be most important for crabs in the intertidal, providing refuge from predat...
Article
1.Pollution of mangrove ecosystems puts their future and that of local communities at risk. Only the use of informed and integrative approaches will successfully maintain and restore these valuable ecosystems.2.Biochemical indicators of organism physiological condition have been widely used to evaluate habitat quality and for early detection of the...
Article
Post-settlement processes can regulate the size and structure of marine invertebrate and fish populations. Faster growth and better physiological condition generally increase the survival potential of early juveniles, being usually associated with structurally complex habitats. Successive cohorts of early juvenile Carcinus maenas were followed in s...
Article
Full-text available
The current conceptual model of reinvasion and settlement for estuarine brachyuran crabs in mesotidal systems is that megalopae undergo selective tidal stream transport, in an upstream direction, and settle by the end of the flood tide. Recent studies on recruitment processes of Carcinus maenas (L.) have reported a clear decoupling between supply,...
Article
Settlement patterns of decapod crustaceans are influenced by size, shape and nature of substrates, as well as by species-specific behaviour patterns. Hog's hair filter material is one of the most commonly used artificial substrates in the study of settlement rates. However, the use of hog's hair collectors in settlement studies poses several proble...
Article
The abundance of the wiskered sole Monochirus hispidus in the Sado Estuary showed a marked seasonal pattern, the highest densities occurred in spring and summer. The density of this species was mainly related, non-linearly, to depth, water transparency and percentage of gravel, fine sand and mud in the sediment. Monochirus hispidus fed mainly on cr...

Questions and Answers

Question & Answers (4)
Question
Are these types of soils similar in composition, in terms of acidity potential, iron pyrites, etc?

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