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Valentin Boissonnas

Valentin Boissonnas
Haute Ecole Arc Neuchâtel · Conservation-Restauration

Master of Arts

About

8
Publications
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31
Citations
Introduction
Valentin Boissonnas graduated in 1997 with honours from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, as a conservator for archaeological and ethnographic artefacts. He is a freelance objects conservator at the Atelier de Conservation Valentin Boissonnas in Zurich, working for museums and private collections. Since1999 he is a lecturer in conservation at the Conservation Department of the HE-Arc in Neuchatel. His work at the HE-Arc is divided between BA and MA students, mainly focusing on the conservation of metallic heritage objects. He is currently conducting field projects in India and Cameroon. A further field of interest is the material culture of Melanesia and Polynesia.

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
Full-text available
Outdoor sculpture is common to most towns and cities and constitutes an important part of their cultural, artistic and urban identity. Over the years, while some art-works can become victims of neglect, others can be subjected to repeated and inva-sive treatment campaigns. In both cases, this can lead to increasing loss of original material and hea...
Article
Full-text available
Bis in das frühe 20. Jahrhundert waren hochkomplexe Federmosaiken Bestandteil kultischer Handlungen in den Dorfschaften des Keram Flusses in Papua Neuguinea. Sie wurden zwischen 1913 und 1935 von Ethnologen und Händlern sowohl als außerordentliche Kunst- leistungen als auch als Belegstücke einer untergehenden Kultur für europäische Museen gesammelt...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
To help metal conservators search for corrosion forms and find treatment protocols, this paper describes the augmentation of the MIFAC-Metal project through its migration to the internet and the addition of the MiCorr Decision Support System (DSS). The new online version of MIFAC-Metal enables conservators to digitally construct stratigraphies that...
Article
To help metal conservators search for corrosion forms and find treatment protocols, this paper describes the augmentation of the MIFAC-Metal project through its migration to the internet and the addition of the MiCorr Decision Support System (DSS). The new online version of MIFAC-Metal enables conservators to digitally construct stratigraphies that...
Research
Full-text available
Conservation of an old egyptian cat from a Swiss museum including XRD of corrosion products, ICP OES of the metal and tomography
Article
The article presents a detailed comparative study of kava mixing bowls associated with the cultural complex of the West Polynesian kava-circle and its Fijian yaqona-circle offshoot. By cross-referencing archaeological evidence, documented collection histories and bowl typologies a clearer picture emerges of the centres where the bowls were produced...
Article
Low-pressure hydrogen gas plasma reduction has been used at the Swiss National Museum in metals conservation since 1990. After a critical re-evaluation of the method in 1994, major changes were introduced. Today, it has become an integral part of the conservation procedures for archaeological iron. Its major advantages are improved mechanical clean...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The new online MiCorr (micorr.org) application enables conservators to digitally construct stratigraphies that they document during their visual observation and local probing of artefacts via Bertholon’s method (Bertholon 2001). Corrosion forms are first described according to the strata structure (metal, corroded metal, corrosion layers etc) and the characteristics of each stratum (morphology, microstructure, texture etc). A graphical user interface on a personal computer allows virtual construction of stratigraphies using encoded building blocks. Conservators then use the MiCorr Decision Support System to compare their observations with corrosion forms already stored in its database. The database entries were made from comprehensive investigations of historic and archaeological artefacts. They were probed physically and analysed for their composition. One search engine of the MiCorr application uses keywords describing corrosion forms, and another uses schematic representations. Using MiCorr application, conservators should be able to find case studies of fully investigated artefacts showing similar corrosion phenomena to the one observed by themselves in a non-invasive way. These corrosion phenomena can be useful for deciding conservation protocols, e.g. diagnosing the stability of metals or determining the location of the limit of the original surface to recover in corrosion product crusts. MiCorr is currently further developed with an Interreg French-Switzerland projetct METALPAT. Bertholon, R., Characterization and location of the original surface of corroded archaeological objects. Surface Engineering, 17 (3), 2001, 241-245.