Uzair Rusli

Uzair Rusli
Universiti Malaysia Terengganu | umt · Institute of Oceanography and Environment - INOS

PhD (Queensland)

About

39
Publications
11,458
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
122
Citations
Citations since 2016
36 Research Items
122 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022010203040
2016201720182019202020212022010203040
2016201720182019202020212022010203040
2016201720182019202020212022010203040
Introduction
I am a biologist interested in the physiology and behaviour of chelonian species. My current interest is investigating behaviour and energetic cost of nest escape by turtle hatchlings. I am a research affiliate of the Sea Turtle Research Unit (SEATRU) of Institute Oceanography and Environment. Feel free to contact me for more information and collaborations.
Additional affiliations
January 2012 - October 2016
The University of Queensland
Position
  • PhD Student
January 2008 - October 2020
Universiti Malaysia Terengganu
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (39)
Article
A potential advantage of group movement in animals is increased locomotion efficiency. This implies a reduced energetic cost for individuals that occur in larger groups such as herds, flocks and schools. When chelonian hatchlings hatch in the underground nest with finite energy for their post-hatching dispersal phase, they face the challenge of min...
Article
Full-text available
The ability for animals to become temporarily immobile via external stimulus is known as tonic immobility (TI) and has been widely described among different taxa. However, TI is poorly documented in turtles. We demonstrate TI in newly emerged green turtle (Chelonia mydas) hatchlings in relation to potential practical applications and discuss the me...
Article
Full-text available
Freshwater turtles can construct their nest in a wide range of soil types, and because different soil types have different physical characteristics such as particle size distribution and compactness, soil type presumably affects digging performance and the energetics of nest escape of turtle hatchlings. Previous studies have reported how cohort siz...
Article
Full-text available
A total of 60 green turtle eggs were obtained from sampling sites in Terengganu and Sabah, Malaysia. Isolation and identification of bacteria from these eggs resulted in 12 genera of Gram-negative bacteria with 12 different species. The most frequently isolated bacteria were Salmonella (30.9%) and Proteus (23.7%). The rest of the microorganisms wer...
Article
Full-text available
The body size of marine megafauna can influence population dynamics because larger females have disproportionally greater reproductive output. We explored how this size scaling relationship can affect predictions of population size structure in nesting sea turtles by combining a phylogenetically controlled meta‐analysis with a long‐term field nesti...
Article
The Asian water monitor ( Varanus salvator ) is a large generalist predator and scavenger lizard. This species has a widespread distribution throughout South and Southeast Asia and is frequently encountered around the edges of urban settlements. Here, we present information on diet diversity and habitat utilisation of a population of Asian water mo...
Article
Context Increasingly, ecological studies of sea turtles are measuring locomotion performance of newly emerged hatchlings in raceways and swimways under the assumption that locomotion performance measured in these structures reflects locomotion performance in nature, and that such measurements reflect the chance of a hatchling surviving dispersion f...
Article
Full-text available
Efforts for the conservation of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) in the Chagar Hutang Turtle Sanctuary (CHTS), Redang Island, Malaysia, have been in place for over two decades. Here we propose that the recruitment of new mothers to this rookery has a significant influence on the recovery of nest abundance in the long term. A 2–3 years’ quasi-periodic...
Article
Full-text available
Sea turtles have been exploited at unsustainable rates globally. In Malaysia, their populations have faced serious declines because of diverse anthropogenic stressors including turtle egg consumption. Redang Island, off the northeast coast of Peninsular Malaysia, is an important rookery for green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) in Southeast Asia. The...
Article
Synchronous digging activity and emergence from underground nests is important for sea turtle hatchlings, as it reduces predation risk and decreases energy consumption. However, patterns of underground hatching and diel digging activity prior to emergence are invisible and remain largely unknown. In this study, we acoustically monitored the activit...
Article
Sea turtle scute abnormalities are observed in higher proportion in hatchlings compared to adults, suggesting that hatchlings with a non-modal scute pattern (NMSP) have a lower chance of surviving to adulthood. In this study, we collected 732 newly emerged hatchlings from Redang Island, Malaysia, and compared their scute classification, size, and m...
Article
Full-text available
Sea turtle eggs incubation involves natural and artificial incubation of eggs, and indeed the depth will be varied and presumably affect the development of hatchlings. For nest relocation, the researcher needs to decide on the depth to incubate the eggs. Sea turtle eggs clutches may vary between 40 to 120 eggs for the green turtle, thus using a sin...
Article
Sea turtle hatchlings emerge from underground nests at night, rapidly crawling seaward to swim off shore. Once in the water, hatchlings might experience high predation rates while in shallow water before reaching deeper water where encounters with predators, and consequently mortality rates, likely decline. Behavioral studies have described differe...
Article
Global sea turtle populations are threatened by rising atmospheric temperatures which result in higher incubation temperatures. Increased incubation temperatures affect embryo survival, hatchling sex ratio and hatchling locomotor performance. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of natural and artificial shade on reducing green turtle (C...
Article
Full-text available
Chelonia mydas is an endangered marine species globally, which its reference blood parameters intervals have been published for some group populations, but baseline health status values are lacking from Malaysia. This study aims to better understand the hematology, biochemical, and blood gas of a wild-nesting green turtle population in the South Ch...
Article
Full-text available
High-resolution ocean circulation models have increased our understanding of the movement and distribution of worldwide ocean currents, which were previously unknown and difficult to study. The metabolic expenditure data obtained through open-flow respirometric analysis was put into an energy budget context by comparing it to their available reserv...
Article
Full-text available
Nest predation is the main cause of hatching failure for many turtle populations. For green turtles (Chelonia mydas) nesting at Chagar Hutang in Redang Island, Malaysia, Asian water monitors (Varanus salvator) are a potential nest predator. However, no studies have documented the space use of this species in coastal habitat adjacent to a sea turtle...
Article
Full-text available
Here, we report the discovery of the exclusive predation of sea turtle hatchlings by several juvenile blacktip reef sharks (Carcharhinus melanopterus) in Chagar Hutang bay on Redang Island, Malaysia, in the South China Sea. Three dead specimens of C. melanopterus were retrieved from ghost nets, and the entire digestive tracts of these sharks solely...
Chapter
Up to now, identification of sea turtle species mainly for tracking the population usually relied on flipper tags or through other physical markers. However, this approach is not practical due to the missing tags over some period. Due to this matter, we propose a photo identification system of the individual sea turtle based on the convolutional ne...
Article
Full-text available
Data on the microplastic abundance in sea turtle nesting beaches of Southeast Asia are limited. We sampled four sea turtle nesting beaches in the northern and southern coastal areas of Terengganu, Malaysia between October and November 2018, to investigate microplastic abundance, shape, and colour at both high tide swash zone and dry dunes. Using op...
Article
Full-text available
Excessive sea turtle nest predation is a problem for conservation management of sea turtle populations. For green turtles (Chelonia mydas) nesting at Chagar Hutang beach, Redang Island in Malaysia, Asian water monitor lizards (Varanus salvator) are nest predator. To help deter water monitors from attacking nest, plastic mesh is placed on top of sea...
Preprint
Full-text available
The selection of the nest site is a critical factor whereby female turtles may choose to nest at the site that minimizes energy expenditure of hatchlings and time spent to construct the nest. Nest substrate such as grain size is hypothesized to influence hatchling fitness by affecting the amount of energy reserves used by the hatchlings during emer...
Chapter
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
Continuous exploitation on the sea turtles has resulted these species be in the verge of extinction. This research focuses on a concept of stability in the dynamics of the sea turtles and human in which we can predict the future population of sea turtles. The objectives of this paper are to construct a sea turtle–human interactions dynamics model w...
Article
Full-text available
Swimming behavior and speed of green turtle (Chelonia mydas) and hawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) hatchlings swimming offshore were compared between individuals that were free swimming and the same individuals towing a float. Towing a float did not influence swimming behavior in either species, but decreased swimming speed by 20% in green...
Article
The nest microenvironment affects hatching and emergence success, sex ratios, morphology, and locomotion performance of hatchling sea turtles. Sand grain size is hypothesised to influence the nest microenvironment, but the influence of sand grain size on incubation of sea turtle eggs has rarely been experimentally tested. At the Chagar Hutang Turtl...
Article
Full-text available
Hatchling turtles typically emerge from underground nests in groups, so the nest escape process may represent another example of animals sharing a task (in this case digging out of a nest) to save on individual energy expenditure. Previous studies have reported the energetic cost of embryonic development across Chelonian taxa, but none has quantifi...
Article
Full-text available
Effects of different incubation methods on crawling and swimming ability of post-emergence green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) hatchlings at Cherating (Kuantan, Pahang) and Chagar Hutang (Pulau Redang, Terengganu) Turtle Sanctuary were analysed during nesting season in 2009. Mean crawling speed of hatchlings incubated in styrofoam box, beach hatchery...
Presentation
Full-text available
It has been nearly two decades since the first evaluation on the splitting sea turtle egg clutches under hatchery conditions and such practice is still implemented in some hatcheries in Malaysia and some other places worldwide. Even though more than half a million turtle hatchlings have been released to the sea annually (in Malaysia particularly),...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
There are two methods used to incubate eggs clutches of sea turtle in Malaysia which are the in-situ and ex-situ practices. The first method, known as in-situ method, is a practice where the nest is marked and left undisturbed to incubate naturally after being laid by females. Once hatched the hatchlings from in-situ nests naturally crawl downhill...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Sustainability of Tender System
Project
Upon emerging from their underground nests on sandy beaches, green turtle hatchlings enter the sea and swim offshore for a period of hours to days using visual cues, ocean waves, and the earth’s magnetic field to stay on course. This initial ‘swimming frenzy’ period is thought to minimize time spent in predator rich shallow waters. After the frenzy period, turtle hatchlings are typically considered as ‘passive migrants’ in that they become entrained in ocean current systems and carried to distant foraging areas. To date, most attempts to model the pelagic dispersal of sea turtles have assumed that turtles drift passively. However, it is important to recognize that turtle hatchlings also likely rely on strategies beyond passive drift and even a minimal amount of swimming is likely to have an important function in their ecology. Until hatchlings start to feed which is thought to occur between 2 and 7 days after entering the sea, they rely upon the energy reserve in their residual yolk to fuel swimming activity. Hence, the quantification of hatchlings’ potential energy is vital to model their active dispersal potential and this information along with the ocean current data can be used more accurate models of hatchling dispersal