Ute Stenkewitz

Ute Stenkewitz
Naturpark Niederlausitzer Heidelandschaft

PhD

About

23
Publications
7,302
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424
Citations
Introduction
Ute Stenkewitz is a wildlife researcher (focus on birds and mammals). Ute is Project Coordinator at the Niederlausitzer Heidelandschaft Nature Park, Germany. Office and info center are in Bad Liebenwerda. Ute´s most recent work has to do with the coordination of a project on Capercaillie. This species has been successfully reintroduced to the region in the recent 10 years. Her efforts on Icelandic Ptarmigan will continue.
Additional affiliations
November 2018 - present
The University of Iceland's Research Centre at Snæfellsnes
Position
  • Project Manager
Description
  • Ptarmigan population dynamics and the relation with climate change • Growth bands and fault bars: stressful times and their relation with Ptarmigan population dynamics • Eider bioecology in Breiðarfjörður bay • Bird monitoring
October 2017 - October 2018
Affiliation: Icelandic Institute of Natural History
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Rock Ptarmigan population dynamics in relation to climate change
May 2010 - June 2017
Icelandic Institute of Natural History & University of Iceland
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Parasites and population change of Rock Ptarmigan in Iceland
Education
September 2010 - June 2017
September 2002 - February 2007
Hochschule für nachhaltige Entwicklung Eberswalde
Field of study
  • Landscape Management / Nature Conservation

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
Testing hypotheses in ecological and evolutionary parasitology can require testing whether host traits or coinfecting parasites explain variation in parasitism by focal species. However, when host traits and coinfecting parasites are considered separately, relations between either and parasitism by focal species can be spurious—a problem that is ad...
Article
Measures of parasitism often differ between hosts. This variation is thought due in part to age or sex differences in exposure to parasites and/or susceptibility to parasitism. We assessed how often age or sex biases in parasitism were found using a large, multi‐year (2006 – 2017) dataset of 12 parasite species of Icelandic Rock Ptarmigan (Lagopus...
Article
Full-text available
We radio‐tracked 15 black‐backed jackals (Canis mesomelas) from 8 adjacent family groups on Benfontein Game Farm (i.e., Benfontein) in South Africa to investigate their movement patterns and social organization. Jackal family groups consisted of mated pairs (alphas), 0–3 nonbreeding adults (betas), and pups, depending on the season. Mean (±SE) home...
Article
The Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) is a rare resident species in Iceland and nests have been found intermittently. Nests are unusual because lemmings (Dicrostonyx spp. and Lemmus spp.), the primary prey of the Snowy Owl across much of its distribution, do not occur in Iceland. We studied summer diets by analyzing pellets from three areas in Iceland wh...
Article
Full-text available
Feather holes have traditionally been suggested to be feeding traces of chewing lice (mallophagans). There is controversy whether mallophagans are the real source of feather holes. We studied mallophagan infestations and holes in tail feathers of 528 rock ptarmigan Lagopus muta collected 2007–2012 in northeast Iceland. Three mallophagans were found...
Article
Full-text available
Populations of rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta) in Iceland fluctuate in multiannual cycles with peak numbers c. every 10 years. We studied the ptarmigan-parasite community and how parasites relate to ptarmigan age, body condition, and population density. We collected 632 ptarmigan in northeast Iceland in early October from 2006 to 2012; 630 (99.7%) we...
Article
Full-text available
Line-transect sampling was used to obtain abundance estimates of an Ant-eating Chat Myrmecocichla formicivora population to compare these with the true size of the population. The population size was determined by a long-term banding study, and abundance estimates were obtained by surveying line transects. The sampling effort was quadrupled to dete...
Article
Full-text available
The black-footed cat (Felis nigripes) is sympatric with several species of larger carnivores, although it is not known how this species partitions resources with potential competitors. From 2006 to 2008, we captured, radio-collared, and monitored 3 adult black-footed cats on Benfontein Game Farm in South Africa. We investigated their spatial, habit...
Article
Full-text available
The spleen and bursa of Fabricius in birds are organs that play an important role in fighting parasite infections. The size of these organs can be used by ecologists as a measure of immune investment, with larger size implying greater investment. The bursa only occurs in juvenile birds during the development of the B cell repertoire, whereas the sp...
Article
The extreme polar environment creates challenges for the resident invertebrate communities and the stress tolerance of some of these animals has been examined over many years. However, although it is well appreciated that standard air temperature records often fail to describe accurately conditions experienced at microhabitat level, few studies hav...
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about the sublethal effects of mesocarnivores on small carnivores, which can have important implications regarding the ecology and behavior of the latter. We investigated the ecology of cape foxes (Vulpes chama) and bat-eared foxes (Otocyon megalotis) in the absence of black-backed jackals (Canis mesomelas), a dominant mesocarnivore...
Article
Full-text available
Cape foxes (Vulpes chama) and bat-eared foxes (Otocyon megalotis) are sympatric with black-backed jackals (Canis mesomelas) over much of southern Africa, although competition with and/or predation by jackals may suppress local populations of both fox species. From 2005 to 2008, we captured, radio-collared, and monitored 11 cape foxes, 22 bat-eared...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction The Black-necked Crane Grus nigricollis is classified as Vulnerable by IUCN, owing to its single small and declining population (BirdLife International 2009). Population declines are thought to be due to loss of wetland habitat and agricultural changes in both its breeding and wintering grounds (BirdLife International 2009). Breeding g...
Article
Full-text available
We determined the seasonal diet of dholes (Cuon alpinus) in northwestern Bhutan in 2009. Results showed that large (>75kg) ungulate species, primarily sambar (Cervus unicolor), were main part of the diet in both the wet and dry seasons. In contrast, small (20–30kg) ungulate species comprised only 10% of the biomass consumed in both seasons. Cattle...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT To investigate the role of black-backed jackals (Canis mesomelas) as predators, we studied diet, prey selection, and predation impact of jackals on 2 game ranches in South Africa that differed in ungulate diversity and biomass. Results showed that large (>15 kg) ungulate species dominated jackal diets throughout the year on both the less d...
Article
Full-text available
Distance sampling using line transects has become a well-known method for estimating densities of both large and small mammals in relatively open habitats, although it has not yet been reported for smaller mammals (<10 kg) in southern Africa. In 2007 and 2008 we used distance sampling to estimate numbers of springhares (Pedetes capensis), Cape hare...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
Feeding associations between birds and mammals are well known throughout the world (e.g. Greenlaw 1967, Dean and MacDonald 1981, Bridgeford 1985, Rodrigues and Monteiro-Filho 1996, Tomazzoni et al. 2005). In southern Africa, opportunistic feeding associations between insectiv-orous bird species and myrmecophagous (ant-and termite-eating) mammals ha...
Article
Full-text available
The influence of environmental and human factors on group sizes of large ungulates is still poorly understood, especially when considered at multiple timescales. We analyzed long-term data of red deer (Cervus elaphus) group sizes collected at 3 timescales in Białowieża Primeval Forest, Poland, from 1986 to 2003. On the daily scale, group size diffe...

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Projects

Projects (7)
Archived project
Ecological research
Archived project
Ecological research