Uri Hasson

Uri Hasson
Università degli Studi di Trento | UNITN · CIMEC - Center for Mind/Brain Sciences

PhD, Cognitive Psychology

About

75
Publications
16,812
Reads
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1,770
Citations
Additional affiliations
December 2016 - December 2018
National Science Foundation
Position
  • Managing Director
September 2008 - present
Università degli Studi di Trento
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
September 2004 - August 2008
University of Chicago
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
September 1999 - August 2004
Princeton University
Field of study
  • Cognitive Psychology
September 1996 - July 1999
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (75)
Article
Full-text available
The capacity for assessing the degree of uncertainty in the environment relies on estimating statistics of temporally unfolding inputs. This, in turn, allows calibration of predictive and bottom-up processing, and signalling changes in temporally unfolding environmental features. In the last decade, several studies have examined how the brain codes...
Article
Full-text available
People seek novelty in everyday life, but they also enjoy viewing the same movies or reading the same novels a second time. What changes and what stays the same when re-experiencing a narrative? In examining this question with functional neuroimaging, we found that brain activity reorganizes in a hybrid, scale-dependent manner when individuals proc...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to represent the emerging regularity of sensory information from the external environment has been thought to allow one to probabilistically infer future sensory occurrences, and thus optimize behavior. However the underlying neural implementation of this process is still not comprehensively understood. Through a convergence of behavior...
Article
Full-text available
Detecting regularities in the sensory environment licenses predictions that enable adaptive behaviour. However, it is unclear whether predictions about object category, location, or both dimensions are mediated by overlapping systems, and relatedly, whether constructing predictions about both category and location is associated with processing bott...
Article
Full-text available
It is known that features of stimuli in the environment affect the strength of functional connectivity in the human brain. However, investigations to date have not converged in determining whether these also impact functional networks' global features, such as modularity strength, number of modules, partition structure, or degree distributions. We...
Preprint
Full-text available
Deep Neural Networks (DNNs) have become an important tool for modeling brain and behaviour. One key area of interest has been to apply these networks to model human similarity judgements. Several previous works have used the embeddings from the penultimate layer of vision DNNs and showed that a reweighting of these features improves the fit between...
Article
When available, people use prior knowledge to predict dimensions of future events such as their location and semantic features. However, few studies have examined how multi-dimensional predictions are implemented, and mechanistic accounts are absent. Using eye tracking, we evaluated whether predictions of target-location and target-category interac...
Article
Full-text available
During wakeful rest, individuals make small eye movements during fixation. We examined how these endogenously-driven oculomotor patterns impact topography and topology of functional brain networks. We used a dataset consisting of eyes-open resting-state (RS) fMRI data with simultaneous eye-tracking (Nilsonne, 2016). The eye-tracking data indicated...
Preprint
Full-text available
During wakeful rest, individuals make small eye movements when asked to fixate. We examined how these endogenously-driven oculomotor patterns impact topography and topology of functional brain networks. We used a dataset consisting of eyes-open resting-state (RS) fMRI data with simultaneous eye-tracking (Nilsonne et al., 2016). The eye-tracking dat...
Preprint
Full-text available
Learning environmental regularities allows predicting multiple dimensions of future events such as their location and semantic features. However, few studies have examined how multi-dimensional predictions are implemented, and mechanistic accounts are absent. Using eye tracking study, we evaluated whether predictions of object-location and object-c...
Article
Cognitive neuroscience can be substantially advanced if structured mechanisms are created to increase its social impact and to develop synergies with some currently more distant disciplines that are developing relevant knowledge. We present such opportunities and argue that pursuing these can benefit from establishing a centralized coordinating org...
Article
Full-text available
A core question underlying neurobiological and computational models of behavior is how individuals learn environmental statistics and use them to make predictions. Most investigations of this issue have relied on reactive paradigms, in which inferences about predictive processes are derived by modeling responses to stimuli that vary in likelihood....
Article
Full-text available
Recent decades have ushered in tremendous progress in understanding the neural basis of language. Most of our current knowledge on language and the brain, however, is derived from lab-based experiments that are far removed from everyday language use, and that are inspired by questions originating in linguistic and psycho-linguistic contexts. In thi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Neuroimaging research has shown that different cognitive tasks induce relatively specific activation patterns, as well as less task-specific deactivation patterns. Here we examined whether individual differences in Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) activity during task performance correlate with the magnitude of task-induced deactivation. In an fMRI s...
Article
Full-text available
Neuroimaging research has shown that different cognitive tasks induce relatively specific activation patterns, as well as less task-specific deactivation patterns. Here we examined whether individual differences in Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) activity during task performance correlate with the magnitude of task-induced deactivation. In an fMRI s...
Article
Full-text available
We explore a combinatorial framework which efficiently quantifies the asymmetries between minima and maxima in local fluctuations of time series. We firstly showcase its performance by applying it to a battery of synthetic cases. We find rigorous results on some canonical dynamical models (stochastic processes with and without correlations, chaotic...
Preprint
Full-text available
Current neurobiological models assign a central role to predictive processes calibrated to environmental statistics. Neuroimaging studies examining the encoding of stimulus uncertainty have relied almost exclusively on manipulations in which stimuli were presented in a single sensory modality, and further assumed that neural responses vary monotoni...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Head motion during brain structural MRI scans biases brain morphometry measurements but quantitative retrospective methods estimating head motion from structural MRI have not been evaluated. Purpose: To verify the hypothesis that two metrics retrospectively computed from MR images: 1) average edge strength (AES, reduced with image bl...
Preprint
Full-text available
A core question underlying neurobiological and computational models of behavior is how individuals learn environmental statistics and use them for making predictions. Treatment of this issue largely relies on reactive paradigms, where inferences about predictive processes are derived by modeling responses to stimuli that vary in likelihood. Here we...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how humans code for and respond to environmental uncertainty/regularity is a question shared by current computational and neurobiological approaches to human cognition. To date, studies investigating neurobiological systems that track input uncertainty have examined responses to uni-sensory streams. It is not known, however, whether t...
Article
Full-text available
Blindness is associated with well-documented changes to the morphometry and function of the occipital cortex. By comparison, its impact on the perisylvian regions in the superior temporal plane (STP) is poorly understood, with many studies reporting null findings on this issue. Here we re-approach this question using a morphometric analysis that re...
Chapter
Full-text available
The mental lexicon is a concept used in linguistics and in psycholinguistics to refer to a speaker’s lexical representations.
Poster
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Multivariate cross-classification is a powerful tool for decoding abstract or supramodal representations from distributed neural populations. However, this approach introduces several methodological challenges not encountered in typical multivariate pattern analysis and information-based brain mapping. In the current report, we review these challen...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Multivariate cross-classification is a powerful tool for decoding abstract or supramodal representations from distributed neural populations. However, this approach introduces several methodological challenges not encountered in typical multivariate pattern analysis and information-based brain mapping. In the current report, we review these challen...
Article
Full-text available
Many factors affect our ability to decode the speech signal, including its quality, the complexity of the elements that compose it, as well as their frequency of occurrence and cooccurrence in a language. Syllable frequency effects have been described in the behavioral literature, including facilitatory effects during speech production and inhibito...
Article
Full-text available
The processing of continuous and complex auditory signals such as speech relies on the ability to use statistical cues (e.g. transitional probabilities). In this study, participants heard short auditory sequences composed either of Italian syllables or bird songs and completed a regularity-rating task. Behaviorally, participants were better at diff...
Data
Cortical thickness results corrected for sex. A. Red: sensitivity to statistics controlled for age and sex. Yellow: sex effects controlled for age and sensitivity to statistics. B. Overlap between sex and statistical effects. (EPS)
Article
Full-text available
Blindness is a unique model for understanding the role of experience in the development the brain’s functional and anatomical architecture. Documenting changes in the structure of anatomical networks for this population would substantiate the notion that the brain’s core network-level organization may undergo neuroplasticity as a result of life-lon...
Article
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Sleep has been shown to subtly disrupt the spatial organization of functional connectivity networks in the brain, but in a way that largely preserves the connectivity within sensory cortices. Here we evaluated the hypothesis that sleeps does impact sensory cortices, but through alteration of activity dynamics. We therefore examined the impact of sl...
Article
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We studied a group of verbal memory specialists to determine whether intensive oral text memory is associated with structural features of hippocampal and lateral-temporal regions implicated in language processing. Professional Vedic Sanskrit Pandits in India train from childhood for around 10 years in an ancient, formalized tradition of oral Sanskr...
Chapter
Full-text available
Naturalistic paradigms of language comprehension offer a potential wealth of information for understanding how language processing occurs in everyday use. This information, however, is not immediately apparent and can only be interpreted when considering (1) basic processes that underlie language comprehension (e.g., memory encoding, memory retriev...
Article
Full-text available
Complex systems are described according to two central dimensions: (a) the randomness of their output, quantified via entropy; and (b) their complexity, which reflects the organization of a system's generators. Whereas some approaches hold that complexity can be reduced to uncertainty or entropy, an axiom of complexity science is that signals with...
Article
Full-text available
Ackermann et al.'s phylogenetic account of speech argues that the basal ganglia imbue speech with emotive content. However, a body of work on auditory/emotive processing is inconsistent with attributing this function exclusively to these structures. The account further overlooks the possibility that the emotion-integration function may be at least...
Article
Full-text available
Neuroimaging studies have shown that task demands affect connectivity patterns in the human brain not only during task performance but also during subsequent rest periods. Our goal was to determine whether ongoing connectivity patterns during rest contain information about both the current rest state, as well as the recently terminated task. Our ex...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The analysis of human brain connectivity networks has become an increasingly prevalent task in neuroimaging. A few recent studies have shown the possibility of decoding brain states based on brain graph classification. Graph kernels have emerged as a powerful tool for graph comparison that allows the direct use of machine learning classifiers on br...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
By combining functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and acquisition of cardiac pulsation during the execution of a cognitive task we identified areas where task-induced changes in brain activity correlated with individuals' cardiac RMSSD. We show the existence of a relationship between task - induced deactivations and RMSSD.
Article
Full-text available
Coding for the degree of disorder in a temporally unfolding sensory input allows for optimized encoding of these inputs via information compression and predictive processing. Prior neuroimaging work has examined sensitivity to statistical regularities within single sensory modalities and has associated this function with the hippocampus, anterior c...
Article
Full-text available
It is known that the brain's resting-state activity (RSA) is organized in low frequency oscillations that drive network connectivity. Recent research has also shown that elements of RSA described by high-frequency and nonoscillatory properties are non-random and functionally relevant. Motivated by this research, we investigated nonoscillatory aspec...
Article
Full-text available
The supratemporal plane contains several functionally heterogeneous subregions that respond strongly to speech. Much of the prior work on the issue of speech processing in the supratemporal plane has focused on neural responses to single speech vs. non-speech sounds rather than focusing on higher-level computations that are required to process more...
Article
Full-text available
Neuroimaging studies have revealed a number of brain regions that show a reduced blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal during externally directed tasks compared with a resting baseline. These regions constitute a network whose operation has become known as the default mode. The source of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal...
Article
Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we identified cortical regions mediating interpretive processes that take place during language comprehension. We manipulated participants' interpretation of texts by asking them to focus on action-, space-, or time-related features while listening to identical short stories. We identify several c...
Article
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The objective of the current study was to develop a semi-automated method to register and parcellate lesioned brains in a surface space with anatomical accuracy, facilitating group-level fMRI analyses in patients with large cortical strokes. Thirteen chronic patients with a single large left hemisphere stroke were included in the study. Our "virtua...
Article
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How do children know the sentence "the glass is empty and not empty" is inconsistent? One possibility is that they are sensitive to the formal structure of the sentences and know that a proposition and its negation cannot be jointly true. Alternatively, they could represent the 2 state of affairs referred to and realize that these are incommensurat...
Article
Everyday communication is accompanied by visual information from several sources, including co-speech gestures, which provide semantic information listeners use to help disambiguate the speaker's message. Using fMRI, we examined how gestures influence neural activity in brain regions associated with processing semantic information. The BOLD respons...
Article
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Article
Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has led to an enormous growth in the study of cognitive neuroanatomy, and combined with advances in high-field electrophysiology (and other methods), has led to a fast-growing field of human neuroscience. Technological advances in both hardware and software will lead to an ever more promising future for...
Article
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The human brain demonstrates complex yet systematic patterns of neural activity at rest. We examined whether functional connectivity among those brain regions typically active during rest depends on ongoing and recent task demands and individual differences. We probed the temporal coordination among these regions during periods of language comprehe...
Article
The increasingly complex research questions addressed by neuroimaging research impose substantial demands on computational infrastructures. These infrastructures need to support management of massive amounts of data in a way that affords rapid and precise data analysis, to allow collaborative research, and to achieve these aims securely and with mi...
Article
Is there a neural representation of speech that transcends its sensory properties? Using fMRI, we investigated whether there are brain areas where neural activity during observation of sublexical audiovisual input corresponds to a listener's speech percept (what is "heard") independent of the sensory properties of the input. A target audiovisual st...
Article
Full-text available
Sentences are the primary means by which people communicate information. The information conveyed by a sentence depends on how that sentence relates to what is already known. We conducted an fMRI study to determine how the brain establishes and retains this information. We embedded sentences in contexts that rendered them more or less informative a...
Article
Both medical research and clinical practice are starting to involve large quantities of data and to require large-scale computation, as a result of the digitization of many areas of medicine. For example, in brain research - the domain that we consider here - a single research study may require the repeated processing, using computationally demandi...
Article
Full-text available
We examined whether the repeated processing of spoken sentences is accompanied by reduced bold oxygenation level-dependent response (repetition suppression) in regions implicated in sentence comprehension and whether the magnitude of such suppression depends on the task under which the sentences are comprehended or on the complexity of the sentence...
Article
How do people understand negated assertions? Negation may function like affirmation if it focuses on the counterfactual situation, i.e., the situation ruled out by the statement. Alternatively, negation could shift focus from the counterfactual to the factual situation referred to in the statement. We tested these hypotheses in a study employing a...
Article
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We present two experiments that cast doubt on existing evidence suggesting that it is impossible to suspend belief in a comprehended proposition. In Experiment 1, we found that interrupting the encoding of a statement's veracity decreased memory for the statement's falsity when the false version of the statement was uninformative, but not when the...
Article
Full-text available
According to some theorists, the strength of a conditional statement is determined solely by the extent to which the conditional's antecedent is sufficient for its consequent. On this view, the strength of conditionals is independent of the degree to which the antecedent is necessary for the consequent. Data from four experiments reported here demo...
Article
Full-text available
The structural alignment theory of similarity distinguishes 2 types of difference that may occur between stimuli: Alignable differences are those related to a commonality, whereas nonalignable differences are not related to a commonality. Alignment theory predicts that alignable differences should be more heavily weighted than nonalignable differen...