Ulrich Brose

Ulrich Brose
Friedrich Schiller University Jena | FSU · Institute of Biodiversity

About

236
Publications
118,176
Reads
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16,370
Citations
Citations since 2017
110 Research Items
9727 Citations
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Introduction
Ulrich Brose currently works at the German Centre for integrative Biodiversity Research iDiv and is affilliated at the Institute of Biodiversity, Friedrich Schiller University Jena. Ulrich does research on ecological networks, species interactions and biodiversity.
Additional affiliations
February 2015 - present
Friedrich Schiller University Jena
Position
  • Professor
February 2015 - April 2016
Friedrich Schiller University Jena
Position
  • Professor
April 2010 - present
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Position
  • Professor (Full)

Publications

Publications (236)
Preprint
Full-text available
Plant community productivity generally increases with biodiversity, but the strength of this relationship exhibits strong empirical variation. In meta-food-web simulations, we addressed if the spatial overlap in plants’ resource access and movement of animals can explain such variability. We found that spatial overlap of plant resource access is a...
Preprint
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On a global scale, fisheries harvest an estimated 96 million tonnes of fish biomass annually, making them one of the most important drivers of marine ecosystem biodiversity. Yet little is known about the interactions between fisheries and the dynamics of complex food webs in which the harvested species are embedded. We have developed a synthetic mo...
Article
Full-text available
Global ecosystems are facing a deepening biodiversity crisis, necessitating robust approaches to quantifying species extinction risk. The lower limit of the macroecological relationship between species range and body size has long been hypothesized as an estimate of the relationship between the minimum viable range size (MVRS) needed for species pe...
Preprint
Full-text available
Movement facilitates and alters species interactions, the resulting food web structures, species distribution patterns, community structures and survival of populations and communities. In the light of global change, it is crucial to gain a general understanding of how movement depends on traits and environmental conditions. Although insects and no...
Article
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Understanding the formation of feeding links provides insights into processes underlying food webs. Generally, predators feed on prey within a certain body‐size range, but a systematic quantification of such feeding niches is lacking. We developed a size‐constrained feeding‐niche (SCFN) model and parameterized it with information on both realized a...
Article
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The relationship between species' body masses and densities is strongly conserved around a three‐quarter power law when pooling data across communities. However, studies of local within‐community relationships have revealed major deviations from this general pattern, which has profound implications for their stability and functioning. Despite multi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Dispersal is critical to animal survival and thus biodiversity in fragmented landscapes. Increasing fragmentation in the Anthropocene necessitates predictions about the dispersal capabilities of the many species that inhabit natural ecosystems. This requires mechanistic, trait-based models of animal dispersal which are sufficiently general as well...
Preprint
Full-text available
- Understanding and predicting how densities of interacting species change over time has been one of the main goals of community ecology, which has become a pressing challenge in the context of global change. - We present the R package ATNr, which provides an implementation of different versions of Allometric Trophic Network models (Yodzis and Inne...
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The ratio of predator-to-prey biomass is a key element of trophic structure that is typically investigated from a food chain perspective, ignoring channels of energy transfer (e.g. omnivory) that may govern community structure. Here, we address this shortcoming by characterising the biomass structure of 141 freshwater, marine and terrestrial food w...
Preprint
Full-text available
The relationship between species body masses and densities is strongly conserved around a three-quarter power law when pooling data across communities. However, studies of local within-community relationships have revealed major deviations from this general pattern, which has profound implications for their stability and functioning. Despite multip...
Preprint
Despite the diversity and functional importance of invertebrates, predicting their response to global warming remains challenging as it requires extensive measurements of physiological performance or rarely available high-resolution distribution data. Mechanistic models can help overcome these limitations by generalizing fundamental physiological p...
Article
Full-text available
Despite intensive research on species dissimilarity patterns across communities (i.e. β‐diversity), we still know little about their implications for variation in food‐web structures. Our analyses of 50 lake and 48 forest soil communities show that, while species dissimilarity depends on environmental and spatial gradients, these effects are only w...
Article
Climate change and land-use intensification pose increasing threats to biodiversity, with climate change expected to eventually surpass other global environmental change drivers and become the greatest threat to biodiversity in the future. Understanding the combined ecological impacts of multiple global change drivers is crucial to predict future s...
Article
Taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic diversities are important facets of biodiversity. Studying them together has improved our understanding of community dynamics, ecosystem functioning, and conservation values.1–3 In contrast to species, traits, and phylogenies, the diversity of biotic interactions has so far been largely ignored as a biodivers...
Article
Full-text available
Resource-use complementarity of producer species is often invoked to explain the generally positive diversity–productivity relationships. Additionally, multi-trophic interactions that link processes across trophic levels have received increasing attention as a possible key driver. Given that both are integral to natural ecosystems, their interactiv...
Preprint
Full-text available
The survival of animals under global warming strongly depends on their individual thermal niches, which result from the balance between energy loss and gain. Active movement is an important component of this energetic balance, as it affects not only energy gain via food intake but also energy loss via activity metabolism. Here, we develop a novel t...
Article
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Animals require a certain amount of habitat to persist and thrive, and habitat loss is one of the most critical drivers of global biodiversity decline. While habitat requirements have been predicted by relationships between species traits and home-range size, little is known about constraints imposed by environmental conditions and human impacts on...
Article
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Bacterial communities are often exposed to temporal variations in resource availability, which exceed bacterial generation times and thereby affect bacterial coexistence. Bacterial population dynamics are also shaped by bacteriophages, which are a main cause of bacterial mortality. Several strategies are proposed in the literature to describe infec...
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Ecological processes and biodiversity patterns are strongly affected by how animals move through the landscape. However, it remains challenging to predict animal movement and space use. Here we present our new r package enerscape to quantify and predict animal movement in real landscapes based on energy expenditure. enerscape integrates a general l...
Article
Full-text available
Global change alters ecological communities with consequences for ecosystem processes. Such processes and functions are a central aspect of ecological research and vital to understanding and mitigating the consequences of global change, but also those of other drivers of change in organism communities. In this context, the concept of energy flux th...
Article
Full-text available
Metacommunity ecology currently lacks a consistent functional trait perspective across trophic levels. To foster new cross‐taxa experiments and field studies, we present hypotheses on how three trait dimensions change along gradients of density of individuals, resource supply and habitat isolation. The movement dimension refers to the ability to mo...
Article
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Significance Understanding the persistence of populations in fragmented landscapes is critical for predicting the consequences of habitat destruction, yet analytical tools are largely lacking. Metapopulation capacity provides one such tool, because it summarizes the influences of habitat area and distribution on population persistence in a single m...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat fragmentation and eutrophication have strong impacts on biodiversity. Metacommunity research demonstrated that reduction in landscape connectivity may cause biodiversity loss in fragmented landscapes. Food-web research addressed how eutrophication can cause local biodiversity declines. However, there is very limited understanding of their c...
Preprint
Full-text available
Adaptative foraging behaviour should promote species coexistence and biodiversity under climate change as consumers are expected to maximise their energy intake, according to principles of optimal foraging theory. We test these assumptions using a unique dataset comprising (1) 22,185 stomach contents of fish species across functional groups and fee...
Article
Full-text available
Earthworms are an important soil taxon as ecosystem engineers, providing a variety of crucial ecosystem functions and services. Little is known about their diversity and distribution at large spatial scales, despite the availability of considerable amounts of local-scale data. Earthworm diversity data, obtained from the primary literature or provid...
Article
Full-text available
Earthworms are an important soil taxon as ecosystem engineers, providing a variety of crucial ecosystem functions and services. Little is known about their diversity and distribution at large spatial scales, despite the availability of considerable amounts of local-scale data. Earthworm diversity data, obtained from the primary literature or provid...
Article
Full-text available
Earthworms are an important soil taxon as ecosystem engineers, providing a variety of crucial ecosystem functions and services. Little is known about their diversity and distribution at large spatial scales, despite the availability of considerable amounts of local-scale data. Earthworm diversity data, obtained from the primary literature or provid...
Article
Full-text available
Land use change and biological invasions collectively threaten biodiversity. Yet, few studies have addressed how altering the landscape structure and nutrient supply can promote biological invasions and particularly invasive spread (the spread of an invader from the place of introduction), or asked whether and how these factors interact with biotic...
Preprint
Full-text available
Resource-use complementarity of producer species is often invoked to explain their generally positive diversity-productivity relationships. Additionally, multi-trophic interactions that link processes across trophic levels have received increasing attention as a possible key driver. Given that both are integral to natural ecosystems, their interact...
Article
Full-text available
Forest soil and litter is inhabited by a diverse community of animals, which directly and indirectly rely on dead organic matter as habitat and food resource. However, community composition may be driven by biotic or abiotic forces, and these vary with changes in habitat structure and resource supply associated with forest land use. To evaluate the...
Article
Full-text available
Dendritic habitats, such as river ecosystems, promote the persistence of species by favouring spatial asynchronous dynamics among branches. Yet, our understanding of how network topology influences metapopulation synchrony in these ecosystems remains limited. Here, we introduce the concept of fluvial synchrogram to formulate and test expectations r...
Article
Food webs capture the trophic relationships and energy fluxes between species, which has fundamental impacts on ecosystem functioning and stability. Within a food web, the energy flux distribution between a predator and its prey species is shaped by food quantity‐quality trade‐offs and the contiguity of foraging. But the distribution of energy flux...
Preprint
Full-text available
Global change alters ecological communities with consequences for ecosystem processes. Such processes and functions are a central aspect of ecological research and vital to understanding and mitigating the consequences of global change, but also those of other drivers of change in organism communities. In this context, the concept of energy flux th...
Article
Global change exposes forest ecosystems to many risks including novel climatic conditions, increased frequency of climatic extremes and sudden emergence and spread of pests and pathogens. At the same time, forest landscape restoration has regained global attention as an integral strategy for climate change mitigation. Owing to unpredictable future...
Preprint
Full-text available
Global change drivers like warming and changing nutrient cycles have a substantial impact on ecosystem functioning. In most modelling studies, organism responses to warming are described through the temperature dependence of their biological rates. In nature, however, organisms are more than their biological rates. Plants are flexible in their elem...
Article
Full-text available
Motivation: We compiled a global database of long-term riverine fish surveys from 46 regional and national monitoring programmes and from individual academic research efforts, with which numerous basic and applied questions in ecology and global change research can be explored. Such spatially and temporally extensive datasets have been lacking for...
Article
Full-text available
Soil is one of the most biodiverse terrestrial habitats. Yet, we lack an integrative conceptual framework for understanding the patterns and mechanisms driving soil biodiversity. One of the underlying reasons for our poor understanding of soil biodiversity patterns relates to whether key biodiversity theories (historically developed for aboveground...
Article
Full-text available
Arthropod herbivores cause substantial economic costs that drive an increasing need to develop environmentally sustainable approaches to herbivore control. Increasing plant diversity is expected to limit herbivory by altering plant-herbivore and predator-herbivore interactions, but the simultaneous influence of these interactions on herbivore impac...
Article
Full-text available
Dispersal and foodweb dynamics have long been studied in separate models. However, over the past decades, it has become abundantly clear that there are intricate interactions between local dynamics and spatial patterns. Trophic meta-communities, i.e. meta-foodwebs, are very complex systems that exhibit complex and often counterintuitive dynamics. O...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding how and why complex communities can be stable has preoccupied ecologists for over a century. Data show that real communities tend to exhibit characteristic motifs and topologies. Despite a large body of theory investigating both ecological (niche partitioning) and evolutionary (speciation and extinction) mechanisms, a general explanat...
Preprint
Full-text available
The impacts of habitat fragmentation and eutrophication on biodiversity have been studied in different scientific realms. Metacommunity research has shown that reduction in landscape connectivity may cause biodiversity loss in fragmentated landscapes. Food-web research addressed how eutrophication increases biomass accumulations at high trophic lev...
Article
Full-text available
• Realized trophic niches of predators are often characterized along a one‐dimensional range in predator–prey body mass ratios. This prey range is constrained by an “energy limit” and a “subdue limit” toward small and large prey, respectively. Besides these body mass ratios, maximum speed is an additional key component in most predator–prey interac...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the increasing ubiquity of biological invasions worldwide, little is known about the scale‐dependent effects of nonnative species on real‐world ecological dynamics. Here, using an extensive time series dataset of riverine fish communities across different biogeographic regions of the world, we assessed the effects of nonnative species on th...
Article
Full-text available
Deforestation and land-use change in tropical regions result in habitat loss and extinction of species that are unable to adapt. The effects of tropical land-use change on ground spiders, a major group of invertebrate predators, are poorly known. With two methods, we showed >50% decline in spider density, species richness, functional diversity, and...
Article
Full-text available
Land-use transitions can enhance the livelihoods of smallholder farmers but potential economic-ecological trade-offs remain poorly understood. Here, we present an interdisciplinary study of the environmental, social and economic consequences of land-use transitions in a tropical smallholder landscape on Sumatra, Indonesia. We find widespread biodiv...
Article
Full-text available
Global warming threatens community stability and biodiversity around the globe. Knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the responses to rising temperatures depends heavily on generic food-web models that do not account for changes in network structure along latitudes and temperature gradients. Using 124 marine rock-pool food webs sampled across fou...
Article
Full-text available
Deforestation and land‐use change in tropical regions result in habitat loss and extinction of species that are unable to adapt to the conditions in agricultural landscapes. If the associated loss of functional diversity is not compensated by species colonizing the converted habitats, extinctions might be followed by a reduction or loss of ecosyste...
Article
Full-text available
Soil organisms, including earthworms, are a key component of terrestrial ecosystems. However, little is known about their diversity, their distribution, and the threats affecting them. We compiled a global dataset of sampled earthworm communities from 6928 sites in 57 countries as a basis for predicting patterns in earthworm diversity, abundance, a...
Article
Full-text available
Soil organisms, including earthworms, are a key component of terrestrial ecosystems. However, little is known about their diversity, their distribution, and the threats affecting them. We compiled a global dataset of sampled earthworm communities from 6928 sites in 57 countries as a basis for predicting patterns in earthworm diversity, abundance, a...
Data
This PDF file includes: Materials and Methods Supplementary Text Figs. S1 to S6 Tables S1 to S4 References
Article
Full-text available
Soil organisms, including earthworms, are a key component of terrestrial ecosystems. However, little is known about their diversity, their distribution, and the threats affecting them. We compiled a global dataset of sampled earthworm communities from 6928 sites in 57 countries as a basis for predicting patterns in earthworm diversity, abundance, a...
Article
Full-text available
Soil organisms, including earthworms, are a key component of terrestrial ecosystems. However, little is known about their diversity, their distribution, and the threats affecting them. We compiled a global dataset of sampled earthworm communities from 6928 sites in 57 countries as a basis for predicting patterns in earthworm diversity, abundance, a...
Data
This PDF file includes: Materials and Methods Supplementary Text Figs. S1 to S6 Tables S1 to S4 References
Data
This PDF file includes: Materials and Methods Supplementary Text Figs. S1 to S6 Tables S1 to S4 References
Data
This PDF file includes: Materials and Methods Supplementary Text Figs. S1 to S6 Tables S1 to S4 References
Data
This PDF file includes: Materials and Methods Supplementary Text Figs. S1 to S6 Tables S1 to S4 References
Article
Full-text available
The functioning and service provisioning of ecosystems in the face of anthropogenic environmental and biodiversity change is a cornerstone of ecological research. The last three decades of biodiversity–ecosystem functioning (BEF) research have provided compelling evidence for the significant positive role of biodiversity in the functioning of many...
Article
Do large organisms occupy higher trophic levels? Predators are often larger than their prey in food chains, but empirical evidence for positive body mass – trophic level scaling for entire food webs mostly comes from marine communities based on unicellular producers. Using published data on stable isotope compositions of 1093 consumer species, we e...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat fragmentation threatens global biodiversity. To date, there is only limited understanding of how the different aspects of habitat fragmentation (habitat loss, number of fragments and isolation) affect species diversity within complex ecological networks such as food webs. Here, we present a dynamic and spatially explicit food web model whic...
Preprint
Soil organisms provide crucial ecosystem services that support human life. However, little is known about their diversity, distribution, and the threats affecting them. Here, we compiled a global dataset of sampled earthworm communities from over 7000 sites in 56 countries to predict patterns in earthworm diversity, abundance, and biomass. We ident...
Preprint
Full-text available
Habitat fragmentation is threatening global biodiversity. To date, there is only limited understanding of how the different aspects of habitat fragmentation (habitat loss, number of fragments and isolation) affect species diversity within complex ecological networks such as food webs. Here, we present a dynamic and spatially-explicit food web model...
Article
The effect of climate change on the amount of carbon stored in the different biological compartments of complex natural communities is relevant for a range of ecosystem functions and services. Temperature‐dependency of many physiological and ecological processes drives this storage capacity. As opposed to other physiological rates, the temperature‐...
Article
Full-text available
Predator–prey interactions in natural ecosystems generate complex food webs that have a simple universal body-size architecture where predators are systematically larger than their prey. Food-web theory shows that the highest predator–prey body-mass ratios found in natural food webs may be especially important because they create weak interactions...
Article
Full-text available
Successfully predicting the future states of systems that are complex, stochastic and potentially chaotic is a major challenge. Model forecasting error (FE) is the usual measure of success; however model predictions provide no insights into the potential for improvement. In short, the realized predictability of a specific model is uninformative abo...
Article
Full-text available
Intraguild predation (IGP), i.e. feeding interaction between two consumers that share the same resource species, is commonly observed in natural food webs. IGP expands vertical niche space and slows down energy flows from lower to higher trophic levels, which potentially affects the diversity and dynamics of food webs. Here, we use food web models...