Tyler D Tunney

Tyler D Tunney
Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Moncton NB · Fisheries and Ecosystem Science

PhD

About

33
Publications
12,133
Reads
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1,691
Citations
Citations since 2016
21 Research Items
1558 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250

Publications

Publications (33)
Article
Full-text available
Predation can be a significant source of natural mortality for small pelagic fish species, rivaling or exceeding fishery removals. Failure to account for changes in natural mortality can introduce uncertainty in the assessment and management of these stocks. In this study, a 10-year span of hydroacoustic data was used to detect Bluefin Tuna Thunnus...
Article
Full-text available
Effective management of freshwater fish habitat is essential to supporting healthy aquatic ecosystems and sustainable fisheries. In Canada, recent changes to the Fisheries Act enhanced the protection of fish habitat, but application of those provisions relies on sound scientific evidence. We employed collaborative research prioritization methods to...
Article
Regime shifts (periods of rapid change punctuating longer periods of lower variability) are observed in a wide range of ecosystems, and effective fisheries management requires the ability to detect these shifts. Detecting shifts is straightforward in single-species time series when transitions are detectable as periods of rapid change. However, shi...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is asymmetrically altering environmental conditions in space, from local to global scales, creating novel heterogeneity. Here, we argue that this novel heterogeneity will drive mobile generalist consumer species to rapidly respond through their behaviour in ways that broadly and predictably reorganize — or rewire — food webs. We use...
Preprint
Full-text available
Climate change is rewiring the food webs that determine the fate of diverse ecosystems. Mobile generalist consumers are responding to climate change by rapidly shifting their behaviour and foraging, driving food webs to flex. Although these responsive generalists form a key stabilizing module in food web structure, the extent to which they are pres...
Preprint
Full-text available
Climate change is asymmetrically altering environmental conditions in space, from local to global scales, creating novel heterogeneity. Here, we argue that this novel heterogeneity will drive mobile generalist consumer species to rapidly respond through their behavior in ways that broadly and predictably reorganize—or rewire—food webs. We use exist...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat coupling is a concept that refers to consumer integration of resources derived from different habitats. This coupling unites fundamental food web pathways (e.g., cross-habitat trophic linkages) that mediate key ecological processes such as biomass flows, nutrient cycling, and stability. We consider the influence of water transparency, an im...
Article
Full-text available
Species richness is regulated by a complex network of scale-dependent processes. This complexity can obscure the influence of limiting species interactions, making it difficult to determine if abiotic or biotic drivers are more predominant regulators of richness. Using integrative modeling of freshwater fish richness from 721 lakes along an 11olati...
Conference Paper
Recreational fisheries managers must cope with trends that are beyond their control such as changes in climate, loss of habitat, or social factors that affect angler behavior. The safe operating space (SOS) of a recreational fishery is the multidimensional region defined by levels of harvest, angler effort, habitat, predation, and other factors in...
Article
Full-text available
The Safe Operating Space (SOS) of a recreational fishery is the multidimensional region defined by levels of harvest, angler effort, habitat, predation and other factors in which the fishery is sustainable into the future. SOS boundaries exhibit trade-offs such that decreases in harvest can compensate to some degree for losses of habitat, increases...
Article
Predicting species responses to perturbations is a fundamental challenge in ecology. Decision makers must often identify management perturbations that are the most likely to deliver a desirable management outcome despite incomplete information on the pattern and strength of food web links. Motivated by a current fishery decline in inland lakes of t...
Article
Full-text available
Patterning of the presence/absence of food web linkages (hereafter topology) is a fundamental characteristic of ecosystems that can influence species responses to perturbations. However, the insight from food web topology into dynamic effects of perturbations on species in individual systems is potentially hindered because most described topologies...
Article
Full-text available
Earth's surface temperatures are projected to increase by ~1–4°C over the next century, threatening the future of global biodiversity and ecosystem stability. While this has fueled major progress in the field of physiological trait responses to warming, it is currently unclear whether routine population monitoring data can be used to predict temper...
Data
Figure S1. Three possible temperature responses of maximum growth rate (r) and carrying capacity (K). Table S1. AIC scores for r‐ and K‐ temperature models.
Article
Full-text available
Fisheries and human dimensions literature suggests that climate change influences inland recreational fishers in North America through three major pathways. The most widely recognized pathway suggests that climate change impacts habitat and fish populations (e.g., water temperature impacting fish survival) and cascades to impact fishers. Climate ch...
Article
Full-text available
Aquatic ecosystems support size structured food webs, wherein predator- prey body sizes span orders of magnitude. As such, these food webs are replete with extremely generalized feeding strategies, especially among the larger bodied, higher trophic position taxa. The movement scale of aquatic organisms also generally increases with body size and tr...
Article
Full-text available
Aquatic ecosystems support size structured food webs, wherein predator-prey body sizes span orders of magnitude. As such, these food webs are replete with extremely generalized feeding strategies, especially among the larger bodied, higher trophic position taxa. The movement scale of aquatic organisms also generally increases with body size and tro...
Chapter
No species exists in a vacuum. Rather, species are embedded within a network of predator-prey interactions in what Charles Darwin referred to as an “entangled bank” (Darwin 1859) and is now known more generally as a food web. In its most fundamental form, a food web provides insight into the feeding relationships in a system. More broadly, food web...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Trophic cascades are indirect positive effects of predators on resources via control of intermediate consumers. Larger-bodied predators appear to induce stronger trophic cascades (a greater rebound of resource density toward carrying capacity), but how this happens is unknown because we lack a clear depiction of how the strength of trophic...
Conference Paper
Territoriality, foraging behavior, and diel activity play key roles in shaping the individual fitness and distribution of stream salmonids. Although these behaviors are likely of similar ecological importance at high versus low latitudes, collecting such data in subarctic and Arctic waters poses several challenges. Short summers reduce the time ava...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Organisms may adjust their behavior to stay cool as natural habitats differentially warm with rising air temperature. Undoubtedly, fundamental ecosystem properties will change in turn, but the impact of the dynamic thermal mosaic on food web interactions is not considered in traditional climate change research. To demonstrate different...
Article
Full-text available
Changing temperature can substantially shift ecological communities by altering the strength and stability of trophic interactions. Because many ecological rates are constrained by temperature, new approaches are required to understand how simultaneous changes in multiple rates alter the relative performance of species and their trophic interaction...
Article
Full-text available
Increases in the frequency, severity and duration of temperature extremes are anticipated in the near future. Although recent work suggests that changes in temperature variation will have disproportionately greater effects on species than changes to the mean, much of climate change research in ecology has focused on the impacts of mean temperature...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Explicitly relating theory to empirical results is a familiar challenge in consumer-resource research. However, concern for climate change impacts and an interest in metabolic ecology have renewed efforts to integrate experimental results and theory for how warming affects trophic interactions. Experiments have shown t...
Article
Full-text available
Macroscopic ecosystem properties, such as major material pathways and community biomass structure, underlie the ecosystem services on which humans rely. While ecologists have long sought to identify the determinants of the trophic height of food webs (food chain length), it is somewhat surprising how little research effort is invested in understand...
Article
Despite long-standing interest in foraging modes as an important element of animal space use, few studies document and compare individual foraging mode differences among species and ecological conditions in the wild. We observed and compared foraging modes of 61 wild Arctic charr, Salvelinus alpinus, 42 brown trout, Salmo trutta, and 50 Atlantic sa...
Conference Paper
Despite widespread interest in the incidence of climate driven biodiversity changes, research only recently attempts to use theory to predict and then empirically test climate influences on the macroscopic properties of nature’s food webs. Given that climate alters lake thermal structure, we hypothesize that climate driven thermal constraints on or...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods That climate change profoundly alters ecosystems and thus potentially threatens the way they function is widely accepted among ecologists. Despite interest in the incidence of climate driven biodiversity changes, relatively few studies examine the influence of climate on the structure and function of nature’s diverse fo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Í íslenskum ám eru þrjár tegundir laxfiska, lax, urriði og bleikja, sem hafa ólíka útbreiðslu og gera mismunandi kröfur til búsvæða. Í þessari rannsókn mældum við fæðuatferli og búsvæði 153 vorgamalla laxfiska við náttúrulegar aðstæður og fannst greinilegur munur á milli tegunda. Laxaseiði fundust í straumharðasta búsvæðinu og hreyfðu sig minnst vi...
Article
Í íslenskum ám eru þrjár tegundir laxfika, lax, urriði og bleikja, sem hafa ólíka útbreiðslu og gera mismunandi kröfur til búsvæða. Í þessari rannsókn mældum við fæðuatferli og búsvæði 153 vorgamalla laxfika við náttúrulegar aðstæður og fannst greinilegur munur á milli tegunda. Laxaseiði fundust í straumharðasta búsvæðinu og hreyfðu sig minnst við...

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