Tyler Barzee

Tyler Barzee
University of Kentucky | UKY · Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering

PhD Biological Systems Engineering

About

11
Publications
1,559
Reads
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85
Citations
Introduction
I am an Assistant Professor of Bioprocess Engineering and Fermentation at the University of Kentucky in the Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering Department. My research interests include: Bioprocessing/Fermentation, Algal and Fungal Biotechnology, Process Modeling, Agricultural Byproduct Upgrading, Renewable Energy, and Technoeconomic/Life Cycle Assessment. Website: https://www.barzeelab.com
Additional affiliations
July 2021 - present
University of Kentucky
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
March 2020 - June 2021
University of California, Davis
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2019 - December 2020
University of California, Davis
Position
  • Instructor
Description
  • • Led the 2019 Mass Transfer and Kinetics core senior-level course consisting of lecture and lab sections to a class of 40. • Organized course materials and created an online video homework series as a student resource. • Created exams and graded course materials. • Collaborated with the Teaching Assistant for effective implementation of lab exercises. • Implemented a course-specific ABET assessment.
Education
December 2016 - March 2020
University of California, Davis
Field of study
  • Biological Systems Engineering
September 2014 - December 2016
University of California, Davis
Field of study
  • Biological Systems Engineering
August 2010 - May 2014
Clemson University
Field of study
  • Biosystems Engineering

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
Cells cultivated in bioreactors offer many possibilities for the production of novel and nutritious food products. Scientific and technological advances in cellular agriculture and processing technologies have allowed for the development of new techniques to utilize in vitro animal cells, plant cells, and microorganisms to mimic the organoleptic an...
Article
Microalgae strains, Chlorella sorokiniana, Chlorella vulgaris, Scenedesmus acutus f. alternans, and Scenedesmus obliquus, can be successfully cultivated on ammonia-rich ultrafiltered anaerobically digested food waste, referred to as food waste permeate (FWP), and its ammonia-stripped counterpart, stripped food waste permeate (SFWP). Using a three-s...
Article
Full-text available
The rapid growth of human civilizations has led to imminent pressures to develop new food products with increased nutritional characteristics and decreased environmental footprints. Filamentous fungi, a class of microorganisms that have been utilized in a wide variety of foods for thousands of years, have recently garnered widespread attention in r...
Article
Highlights N, P, Ca, and Mg were mainly localized to fine digestate solids (0.45 µm to 1 mm). 50% to 60% of NH 4 ⁺ -N was found in digestate solids between 0.45 and 75 µm. K and Na were mainly transferred to the ultrafiltration permeate (<0.45 µm). Mixing of coarse and fine solids can optimize nutrient and salt ratios in products. Abstract . Food...
Article
Five plant species from two Chinese constructed wetland (CW) environments were studied for the production of bioethanol using simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). Fourteen CW plant species were found in the constructed wetlands and four species (Phragmites australis, Fargesia spathacea F., Thalia dealbata, and Juncus effusus L.) co...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated the effects of applying anaerobically digested food waste and dairy manure-derived biofertilizers to processing tomatoes. The biofertilizers were produced from a pilot scale system consisting of coarse solid separation and ultrafiltration (5,000 Da) with a capacity of approximately 3.8 m3*d-1. The coarse solids had particle...
Chapter
Cultivation of oleaginous microorganisms on wastewater provides alternative biofuel options while also acting as a remediation technique for alternative wastewater treatment. This chapter describes guidelines and methods for the production of oleaginous microorganisms—with a focus on microalgae—using wastewater as a growth medium while considering...
Article
Peromyscus leucopus (White-footed Mouse) is a common host for Cuterebra fontinella (Bot Fly), but few studies of this interaction in the southeastern US exist. We assessed the movement of White-footed Mice infested with Bot Flies at 9 riparian woodland sites in Spartanburg County, SC. Our objectives were to determine the prevalence of bot warbles,...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
This study compared digestate from two anaerobic digesters of different feedstocks (food waste and dairy manure) and produced solid and liquid fertilizer products for inclusion in a farm-scale tomato plant growth experiment. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate vibratory screening and membrane filtration and to characterize elemental flows during the processing of two digestates. Solid and liquid fertilizer products were produced in a developed pilot scale integrated vibratory screen, membrane filtration, and ambient drying system. Experimental results showed that the elemental compositions of the two digestates were different but shared some similarities. The food waste digestate had higher N and Na, similar P and K, and lower Mg contents than the dairy manure digestate. The coarse solids of both digestates were nutrient poor and the K and Na were present mostly in the liquid obtained following filtration with 0.45 µm membrane. The dairy manure digestate had a higher amount of fine solids between 0.45 – 75 µm than the food waste digestate but the majority of N was contained in these fine solids for both digestates. P and Mg were present in larger particle sizes for the food waste digestate than the dairy manure digestate. For the fertilizer products produced with pilot scale equipment, the TKN in the liquid product for the food waste and dairy manure digestate was 2.3 and 1.2 g/L, respectively, over 90% of which was contributed by NH4-N. The dried solid products of approximately 60% moisture content contained TKN concentrations of 6.3% and 4.7% for the food waste and dairy manure digestates, respectively (dry basis).