Truman P Young

Truman P Young
University of California, Davis | UCD · Department of Plant Sciences

Ph.D.

About

254
Publications
108,405
Reads
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Citations
Introduction
Truman P. Young is a Research Professor and Professor Emeritus in the Department of Plant Sciences, at the University of California, Davis. Truman continues to do research in plant population and community ecology, restoration ecology, and conservation biology in human-dominated landscapes. Two of the major research projects of the Young lab are the Kenya Long-term Exclosure Experiment (KLEE), and Priority and Year Effects in Restoration (PRYER).
Additional affiliations
July 2003 - June 2020
University of California, Davis
Position
  • Professor
January 1996 - May 2003
University of California, Davis
Position
  • Lecturer
September 1991 - December 1995
Fordham University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Education
September 1976 - May 1981
University of Pennsylvania
Field of study
  • Biology
September 1972 - December 1975
University of Chicago
Field of study
  • Biology

Questions

Questions (11)
Question
Elevational niches (zones) are likely determined as much by rainfall (soil moisture) as by temperature. I have been thinking about the implications for this for climate change projections, which tend to emphasis temperature (not soil moisture) when considering species movements on mountains in response to climate change. Cn anyone direct me to references that address this potential conflation?
Question
We are looking for any reference that tested sowing all seed in a single year versus sowing the same total amount of seed but spread across several years (e.g., plant 1/3 as much seed over each of 3 years, and compare success to all the seed planted in 1 (or each) of the 3 years), particularly in a revegetation/restoration setting.
Question
It occurs to me that nursery-grown plants (in the absence of herbivores) do not develop (inducible) defenses, and that when planted out, may suffer greater herbivore damage, at least initially. Does anyone have examples of this, or suggestions of it, from the literature?
Question
Anyone know that name of this plant with epiphyllous inforescences? It is in a garden in Leipzig, Germany.
Question
I am looking for: Graham, S.A. 1958. Results of deer exclosure experiments in the Ottawa National Forest. Transactions of the North American Wildlife Conf. 23:478-490

Projects

Projects (6)
Project
Interacting effects of multiple ecological drivers can have dramatic consequences for species recruitment and community assembly not evident from individual effects. To understand how post-fire conifer recruitment varies with interacting abiotic and biotic contingencies, we established an experiment that crossed a manipulation of snowpack with a removal of surrounding shrubs, which may serve as competitors or facilitators of tree seedlings. We seeded two conifer species, Pinus ponderosa and Abies concolor, within these plots in two consecutive years, one relatively normal and the other with an unusually wet winter and hot summer, and tracked the survival and growth of these seedlings for multiple years. Overall, our results demonstrate that the competitive effect of shrubs on tree seedlings, which is often assumed to be pervasive in this system, is in reality highly context-dependent.