Trevor Zink

Trevor Zink
Loyola Marymount University | LMU · College of Business Administration

PhD

About

30
Publications
28,135
Reads
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1,131
Citations
Introduction
I am interested in corporate environmental strategy, waste management, and the idea of a truly green business. My research builds on concepts, theories and techniques from industrial ecology, economics, and strategic management.
Additional affiliations
August 2014 - present
Loyola Marymount University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
May 2014 - present
Loyola Marymount University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
June 2011 - June 2013
University of California, Santa Barbara
Position
  • Life Cycle Assessment of Used Oil Management in California
Description
  • As part of Senate Bill 546, this project is an LCA of the used oil management system in CA. The results of the LCA will assist CalRecycle in providing suggestions to the Legislature regarding policy changes to promote responsible management of used oil.
Education
September 2010 - June 2012
September 2010 - June 2014
University of California, Santa Barbara
Field of study
  • Environmental Science and Management
January 2009 - May 2010
Loyola Marymount University
Field of study
  • Business Administration

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Full-text available
Touting products like LEDs and recycled plastic packaging as “green” is misleading, because it fails to account for their effects on markets and consumer behavior and for the resulting environmental consequences. The authors offer what they say is a better approach: measuring the overall “net green” impact of the product.
Article
Full-text available
The so-called circular economy—the concept of closing material loops to preserve products, parts, and materials in the industrial system and extract their maximum utility—has recently started gaining momentum. The idea of substituting lower-impact secondary production for environmentally intensive primary production gives the circular economy a str...
Article
Full-text available
Capitalism is economically stable only if new investment creates jobs at least as fast as efficiency eliminates them, and physically sustainable only if sufficient material sources and pollution sinks exist to support new investment. We are passing limits on both conditions, leading to twin problems: A labor problem, where technology may begin to e...
Article
Full-text available
Proponents of material recycling typically point to two environmental benefits: disposal (landfill/incinerator) reduction and primary production displacement. However, in this paper we mathematically demonstrate that, without displacement, recycling can delay but not prevent any existing end‐of‐life material from reaching final disposal. The only w...
Article
Full-text available
The most significant environmental benefit of recycling or reusing a wide range of products and materials is typically the potential to displace primary material production; lack of displacement significantly reduces the environmental benefits of these activities. Because no consensus method to estimate displacement rate has emerged, environmental...
Article
Full-text available
The circular economy stands at a crossroads between true systemic change and rebranded business-as-usual. It will either evolve to become functional—optimizing technical capabilities to mimic resilient ecosystems—or dysfunctional—reinforcing current destructive, destabilizing structures and incentives despite appearing to make marginal progress. Th...
Article
Full-text available
Voluntary sustainability standards that establish global rules for firms’ environmental and/or social conduct and allow for verification of firm compliance via third-party certification hold the promise to govern firms’ sustainability conduct in a globalizing world economy. However, the recent proliferation of competing and overlapping global susta...
Article
Full-text available
Recycling materials from end-of-life products has the potential to create environmental benefit by displacing more harmful primary material production. However, displacement is governed by market forces and is not guaranteed; if full displacement does not occur, the environmental benefits of recycling are reduced or eliminated. Therefore, quantifyi...
Article
Full-text available
The recycling of material resources lies at the heart of the industrial ecology (IE) metaphor. The very notion of the industrial ecosystem is motivated by the idea that we should learn from natural ecosystems how to " close the loop. " Recycling is not just central to IE, it is part of everyday life. Unfortunately, how the IE community and the publ...
Article
Full-text available
Adaptive management is broadly recognized as critical for managing natural resources, yet in prac-tice it often fails to achieve intended results for two main reasons: insufficient monitoring and inade-quate stakeholder buy-in. Citizen science is gaining momentum as an approach that can inform natural resource management and has some promise for so...
Article
Full-text available
Used oil collection rates over the period from 2007 to 2012 were estimated from state hazardous waste hauling records.•A methodology is presented for computing an aggregate material flow measurement from a collection of observations.•Over the study period, about 375–450 kt of used oil wastes were collected each year, amounting to 70–80% of recovera...
Conference Paper
While firms have historically only faced pressures to comply with government regulations, recently various non-governmental bodies such as NGOs, industry groups, and individual firms have established voluntary initiatives and standards for acceptable social and environmental conduct of firms. Firms in emerging economies are frequently pressured by...
Thesis
Full-text available
Human activities continue to degrade the natural environment in myriad ways, and at the heart of the problem is industrial activity—the extraction of resources, production, transportation, and use of goods, and the eventual disposal or recycling of materials. Yet, opportunities exist to engage industrial activity in creative, strategic ways that wi...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose Waste management for end-of-life (EoL) smartphones is a growing problem due to their high turnover rate and concentration of toxic chemicals. The versatility of modern smartphones presents an interesting alternative waste management strategy: repurposing. This paper investigates the environmental impact of smartphone repurposing as compared...

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