Trevor J. Krabbenhoft

Trevor J. Krabbenhoft
University at Buffalo, The State University of New York | SUNY Buffalo · Department of Biological Sciences

PhD

About

54
Publications
11,208
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
729
Citations
Introduction
Trevor J. Krabbenhoft currently works at the Department of Biological Sciences and the RENEW Institute, University at Buffalo. Trevor does research in Ecology, Limnology and Evolutionary Biology. Their current project is 'Global Synthesis of Climate Change Effects on Inland Fish.'

Publications

Publications (54)
Conference Paper
Anticipating and managing climate-induced ecosystem transformations in large rivers is particularly challenging given their inherently complex socio-ecological dynamics that often cross jurisdictional boundaries. We examine how the Resist-Accept-Direct (RAD) framework can facilitate informed decision making and a more cohesive and proactive approac...
Article
Full-text available
Groups of sympatric taxa with low inter‐specific genetic differentiation, but considerable ecological differences, offer great opportunities to study the dynamics of divergence and speciation. This is the case of ciscoes (Coregonus spp.) in the Laurentian Great Lakes, which are characterized by a complex evolutionary history and are commonly descri...
Article
Full-text available
Octocorals are conspicuous members of coral reefs and deep-sea ecosystems. Yet, species boundaries and taxonomic relationships within this group remain poorly understood, hindering our understanding of this essential component of the marine fauna. We used a multifaceted approach to revisit the systematics of the Caribbean octocorals Plexaura homoma...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change will continue to be an important consideration for conservation practitioners. However, uncertainty in identifying appropriate management strategies, particularly for understudied species and regions, constrains the implementation of science‐based solutions and adaptation strategies. Here, we share a decision‐path approach to reduce...
Preprint
Full-text available
In this study, we combined reduced representation DNA sequencing from nextRAD with whole genome sequencing to identify putative sex-associated genetic markers, and to design primers for PCR validation. Several analytical methods were employed to detect potential sex-specific short reads from nextRAD, sex-specific contigs from genome sequencing and...
Article
Full-text available
Fishes of the family Catostomidae (“suckers”; Teleostei: Cypriniformes) are hypothesized to have undergone an allopolyploidy event approximately 60 million years ago. However, genomic evidence has previously been unavailable to assess this hypothesis. We sequenced and assembled the first chromosome-level catostomid genome, Chinese sucker (Myxocypri...
Article
Full-text available
Ecosystem transformation involves the emergence of persistent ecological or social–ecological systems that diverge, dramatically and irreversibly, from prior ecosystem structure and function. Such transformations are occurring at increasing rates across the planet in response to changes in climate, land use, and other factors. Consequently, a dynam...
Chapter
Full-text available
At its core, conservation genetics aims to characterize genetic diversity in space and time, to infer processes that change diversity, and to use that information to prescribe actions that maintain and enhance diversity and self-sustainability of imperiled species. The field of conservation genomics, fueled by rapid advances in DNA sequencing and g...
Preprint
Full-text available
Groups of sympatric taxa with low inter-specific genetic differentiation, but considerable ecological differences, offer great opportunities to study the dynamics of divergence and speciation. This is the case of ciscoes ( Coregonus spp.) in the Laurentian Great Lakes, which are characterized by a complex evolutionary history and are commonly descr...
Article
Full-text available
Local adaptation can drive diversification of closely related species across environmental gradients and promote convergence of distantly related taxa that experience similar conditions. We examined a potential case of adaptation to novel visual environments in a species flock (Great Lakes salmonids, genus Coregonus) using a new amplicon genotyping...
Article
Ecosystem transformation can be defined as the emergence of a self‐organizing, self‐sustaining, ecological or social–ecological system that deviates from prior ecosystem structure and function. These transformations are occurring across the globe; consequently, a static view of ecosystem processes is likely no longer sufficient for managing fish, w...
Preprint
Full-text available
Local adaptation can drive diversification of closely related species across environmental gradients and promote convergence of distantly related taxa that experience similar conditions. We examined a potential case of adaptation to novel visual environments in a species flock (Great Lakes salmonids, genus Coregonus) using a new amplicon genotyping...
Article
Full-text available
Inland fishes provide important ecosystem services to communities worldwide and are especially vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Fish respond to climate change in diverse and nuanced ways, which creates challenges for practitioners of fish conservation, climate change adaptation, and management. Although climate change is known to affect...
Article
The cover image, by Kirk W. Olson et al., is based on the Original Article Pelagic‐littoral resource polymorphism in Hovsgol grayling Thymallus nigrescens from Lake Hovsgol, Mongolia DOI: 10.1111/eff.12464.
Article
Full-text available
Resource polymorphism is a widespread phenomenon in post‐glacial fishes where multiple morphotypes of a species occur sympatrically and exhibit distinct resource use. Availability of open niches and high levels of within and among species competition are thought to drive differences in morphology and may provide insights into early stages of specia...
Article
Full-text available
Comparative transcriptomics can now be conducted on organisms in natural settings, which has greatly enhanced understanding of genome–environment interactions. Here, we demonstrate the utility and potential pitfalls of comparative transcriptomics of wild organisms, with an example from three cyprinid fish species (Teleostei:Cypriniformes). We prese...
Article
Full-text available
Although climate change is an important factor affecting inland fishes globally, a comprehensive review of how climate change has impacted and will continue to impact inland fishes worldwide does not currently exist. We conducted an extensive, systematic primary literature review to identify English-language, peer-reviewed journal publications with...
Article
Full-text available
Climate is a critical driver of many fish populations, assemblages, and aquatic communities. However, direct observational studies of climate change impacts on North American inland fishes are rare. In this synthesis, we (1) summarize climate trends that may influence North American inland fish populations and assemblages, (2) compile 31 peer-revie...
Article
Full-text available
Comparative transcriptomics can now be conducted on organisms in natural settings, which has greatly enhanced understanding of genome-environment interactions. However, important data handling and quality control challenges remain, particularly when working with non-model species outside of a controlled laboratory environment. Here, we demonstrate...
Article
Full-text available
Disruption of natural flow regimes, nutrient pollution, and other consequences of human population growth and development have impacted most major rivers of the world. Alarming losses of aquatic biodiversity and biotic homogenization coincide with human-caused river alteration, but effects on aquatic ecosystem processes are not as well documented....
Article
Full-text available
We explore the trophic role that a diverse sympatric group of fishes in the genus Chirostoma play in a large, shallow lake in central Mexico, Lake Chapala. We use δ 13 C and δ 15 N stable isotope – based food web analyses to explore how they relate to other components of the Lake Chapala ecosystem. We find five Chirostoma species in top trophic lev...
Article
Full-text available
Freshwater fish commonly exhibit differences in reproductive seasonality within assemblages. However, the extent of variation in reproductive timing among years is less well understood, particularly in relation to environmental variation. Phenological shifts in response to environmental variation, including climate change, can differ among species...
Article
Full-text available
Genetic determinants of seasonal reproduction are not fully understood but may be important predictors of organism responses to climate change. We used a comparative approach to study the evolution of seasonal timing within a fish community in a natural common garden setting. We tested the hypothesis that allelic length variation in the PolyQ domai...
Data
##Assembly-Data-START## Sequencing Technology :: Sanger dideoxy sequencing ##Assembly-Data-END##
Data
##Assembly-Data-START## Sequencing Technology :: Sanger dideoxy sequencing ##Assembly-Data-END##
Data
##Assembly-Data-START## Sequencing Technology :: Sanger dideoxy sequencing ##Assembly-Data-END##
Data
##Assembly-Data-START## Sequencing Technology :: Sanger dideoxy sequencing ##Assembly-Data-END##
Data
##Assembly-Data-START## Sequencing Technology :: Sanger dideoxy sequencing ##Assembly-Data-END##
Data
##Assembly-Data-START## Sequencing Technology :: Sanger dideoxy sequencing ##Assembly-Data-END##
Data
##Assembly-Data-START## Sequencing Technology :: Sanger dideoxy sequencing ##Assembly-Data-END##
Data
##Assembly-Data-START## Sequencing Technology :: Sanger dideoxy sequencing ##Assembly-Data-END##
Data
##Assembly-Data-START## Sequencing Technology :: Sanger dideoxy sequencing ##Assembly-Data-END##
Data
##Assembly-Data-START## Sequencing Technology :: Sanger dideoxy sequencing ##Assembly-Data-END##
Data
##Assembly-Data-START## Sequencing Technology :: Sanger dideoxy sequencing ##Assembly-Data-END##
Data
##Assembly-Data-START## Sequencing Technology :: Sanger dideoxy sequencing ##Assembly-Data-END##
Conference Paper
The exact timing of spawning is critically important for reproductive success of minnows and other fishes. Previous studies have shown that allele length polymorphism in one gene, Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput (Clock), is correlated with timing of migration and reproduction in phylogenetically-disparate organisms such as salmon and songbi...
Conference Paper
Fish species often exhibit differences in reproductive timing within a community. In arid-land river systems where resource availability is temporally variable, differences in timing can differentially affect reproductive success among species. Consequently, reproductive timing can be an important determinant of adult fish community composition. In...
Conference Paper
Efforts toward advancing our understanding of adaptation of fishes to their environment are hampered by a lack of genomic resources for non-model species. For the post-genomics revolution to reach full fruition, we need to extend resources developed for model organisms (e.g., zebrafish, Danio rerio) for use in non-model species. The recent advent o...
Article
Full-text available
We propose a framework for hypothesis-testing of stable isotope ratios in ecological studies. Statistical procedures are based on analysis of nested linear models and a residual permutation procedure (RPP) that is employed to evaluate probabilities associated with test statistics. We used simulated examples and a real data set to illustrate the uti...
Chapter
Full-text available
Timing of reproduction differs among fish species in nearly all rivers, and reproductive phenology is predicted to strongly influence freshwater fish commu-nity structure in some systems. Despite its potential importance, few long-term stud-ies of reproductive phenology in river fishes have been conducted in a community context. Here, we evaluated...
Article
Full-text available
Two, exceptionally large (51.0 and 36.6 mm SL), pre-transitional larval tonguefishes, collected in the water column and near surface waters overlying deep oceanic waters off the Galápagos Islands, are described and compared with larval stages and adults of eastern Pacific species of Symphurus. The larger specimen, Symphurus varius Garman, 1899, fea...
Article
Full-text available
An extensive body of research has recently demonstrated patterns of parallel and/or convergent evolution that arise from divergent natural selection pressures exerted across environmental gradients. These studies, although providing some of our best empirical evidence for natural selection, have focused on rather narrow phylogenetic scopes, more of...
Article
Full-text available
Thirty-eight microsatellite markers were developed from an enriched genomic DNA library of the cyprinid fish (minnow) Dionda episcopa. The microsatellites include 31 perfect-repeat motifs (29 dinucleotide, 1 trinucleotide, and 1 tetranucleotide) and 7 imperfect-repeat dinucleotide motifs. The microsatellite primers were used to amplify microsatelli...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods We studied spatial and temporal dynamics of energy sources and trophic structure of the fish community in the middle Rio Grande, New Mexico by evaluating stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen at four locations and over a time span of 70 years. At present, the Rio Grande is regulated for irrigation and flood control,...
Article
Full-text available
A new species of pygmy sunfish, Elassoma gilberti (Elassomatidae), is described from northwestern Florida and extreme southwestern Georgia. It previously has been confused with its sister species, Elassoma okefenokee Böhlke 1956. The two are very similar morphologically, but differ in the number of preopercular canal pores (four in E. gilberti, thr...
Article
Full-text available
A major challenge faced by conservation officials is determining which habitats are most vulnerable to anthropogenic perturbation and thus are in most critical need of protection. We utilized a fish with life history attributes presumably conducive to low rates of gene flow and small effective population size to gain insight into the appropriate co...
Article
Full-text available
Symphurus bathyspilus, which attains standard lengths up to 121 mm, is described on the basis of 84 specimens collected in deep waters (248-500 m) in the Philippine Archipelago and off Indonesia. This species is characterized by the combination of a predominant 1-2-2 pattern of interdigitation of dorsal pterygiophores and neural spines; 14 caudal-f...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
For example, EtOH, freezing, RNAlater, etc.
The goal is to maximize the amount of high molecular weight DNA for long read sequencing.  
Thanks!

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Climate change effects on inland fish manifest in non-linear and often confounding ways over varying ecoregions and time-scales. A comprehensive understanding of how climate change is and will impact inland fishes worldwide is key to sustainable management of this ecologically and economically important natural resource. Synthesis of projected and documented impacts of climate change on inland fishes globally can be useful to inform future research and management efforts. Since the mid-1980s, scientists have projected the effects of climate change on inland fish, and in more recent years, documentation of climate change impacts on fish has increased, albeit the number of documented impacts of climate change on inland fish remains low. We conducted an extensive, systematic literature review to identify both projected and documented examples of climate change impacts on fish globally. We did not include studies that analyzed climate variability; thus, all documented examples showed a change in precipitation, temperature, or other climate variable that was be attributed to climate change by the authors. We then categorized the documented studies into 6 groups based on the type of response variable studied (i.e., demographic, phenological, distributional, etc.) and extracted the data to quantitatively analyze trends across species traits and thermal guilds. Dissecting and providing current global trends in fish responses to climate change by ecological and thermal guild will help managers anticipate future changes in fish populations and develop more strategic management plans for individual species and groups.