Travis Seaborn

Travis Seaborn
North Dakota State University | NDSU · School of Natural Resources

Ph.D. Biology
Conservation biologist. Landscape ecology and genomics. Individual-based and other eco/evo modeling.

About

18
Publications
2,757
Reads
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100
Citations
Introduction
Currently working on agent-based models to evaluate adaptive capacity in redband trout. Interested broadly in helping solve conservation issues with modelling, while answering basic biology questions. Conservation genetics, conservation genomics, ecological niche modelling, distribution modelling, population viability analysis, and others. Always happy to collaborate! Full CV can be found here: https://www.travisseaborn.com/cv.html
Additional affiliations
July 2019 - present
University of Idaho
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
August 2014 - July 2019
Washington State University
Field of study
  • Biology
August 2012 - May 2014
Western Carolina University
Field of study
  • Biology
September 2005 - March 2010

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
A critical decision in landscape genetic studies is whether to use individuals or populations as the sampling unit. This decision affects the time and cost of sampling and may affect ecological inference. We analyzed 334 Columbia spotted frogs at 8 microsatellite loci across 40 sites in northern Idaho to determine how inferences from landscape gene...
Article
Species distribution estimates are often used to understand the niche of a species; however, these are often based solely on climatic predictors. When the influences of biotic factors are ignored, erroneous inferences about range and niche may be made. We aimed to integrate climate data with a unique set of available land cover and land use data fo...
Article
Full-text available
Adaptive capacity is a topic at the forefront of environmental change research with roots in both social, ecological, and evolutionary science. It closely related to the evolutionary biology concept of adaptive potential. In this systematic literature review we: 1) Summarize the history of these topics and related fields; 2) Assess relationship(s)...
Article
Full-text available
Whole‐genome sequencing is revolutionizing our understanding of organismal biology, including adaptations likely to influence demographic performance in different environments. Excitement over the potential of genomics to inform population dynamics has prompted multiple conservation applications, including genomics‐based decision‐making for translo...
Article
Full-text available
Many species that undergo long breeding migrations, such as anadromous fishes, face highly heterogeneous environments along their migration corridors and at their spawning sites. These environmental challenges encountered at different life stages may act as strong selective pressures and drive local adaptation. However, the relative influence of en...
Article
Full-text available
The rate of global climate change is projected to outpace the ability of many natural populations and species to adapt. Assisted migration (AM), which is defined as the managed movement of climate-adapted individuals within or outside the species ranges, is a conservation option to improve species’ adaptive capacity and facilitate persistence. Alth...
Article
Full-text available
Although the random forest algorithm has been widely applied to remotely sensed data to predict characteristics of forests, such as tree canopy height, the effect of spatial non-stationarity in the modeling process is oftentimes neglected. Previous studies have proposed methods to address the spatial variance at local scales, but few have explored...
Article
Phenotypic variation among populations is thought to be generated from spatial heterogeneity in environments that exert selection pressures that overcome the effects of gene flow and genetic drift. Here, we tested for evidence of isolation by distance or by ecology (i.e., ecological adaptation) to generate variation in early life history traits and...
Article
Population genetic and population viability analyses are powerful instruments that can be used to evaluate the status of populations of conservation concern. However, these two methods are rarely integrated. To better understand the status of the last known Northern Leopard Frog (Lithobates pipiens) population in Washington State and investigate th...
Article
Full-text available
• Surveys for environmental DNA (eDNA) can provide an efficient and effective means of detecting aquatic organisms in various types of aquatic systems. • In the summer of 2017, the efficacy of a new, integrated eDNA backpack sampler to detect two native amphibians (Rana sierrae and R. cascadae) at risk was tested in complex mountain meadows in Cali...
Article
Full-text available
Inclusion of dispersal data in models of species’ distributions in response to environmental change has been advocated for more than 15 years. We investigated whether there has been a shift in recent publications to include dispersal processes and how dispersal estimates explicitly change the conclusions of analyses. To address this question, we co...
Article
The Spruce—fir Moss Spider (Microhexura montivaga) is a federally endangered species found only in the high-elevation southern Appalachian spruce—fir forests. Little is known about the basic ecology of the spider. The goal of this project was to determine the temperature and humidity parameters of the microhabitat around known spider locations. iBu...
Article
Full-text available
One of the major challenges for conservation physiologists is to determine how current or future environmental conditions relate to the health of animals at the population level. In this study, we measured prevalence of disease, mean condition of the body, and mean resting levels of corticosterone and testosterone in a total of 28 populations acros...
Thesis
Full-text available
The spruce-fir moss spider (Microhexura montivaga) is a federally endangered species of spider found only in the high-elevation Southern Appalachian spruce-fir forests on North-facing slopes underneath moss mats. Despite this fact, little is known about some of the basic ecology of the spider, more specifically the characteristics of the habitat fo...
Article
Full-text available
Epibiont and basibiont relationships can have positive and negative effects on both organisms involved, ranging in intensity from minor to major effects. Limpets of species Lottia pelta are commonly found with two algal species growing on their backs, Ulva lactuca and Acrosiphonia spp. Previous research has shown that basibionts (substrate organism...
Article
Full-text available
Consensus guidelines recommend various screening examinations for survivors after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but how often these examinations detect abnormal findings is unknown. We reviewed the medical records of 118 patients who received comprehensive, standardized evaluations at 1 year after allogeneic HCT at Fred Hutch...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
I think it is most helpful to see the official overall goals of this massive project which I am currently a part of. My particular assignment is within the trout working group as I aim to build agent-based models to simulate the future of redband trout in Idaho. From the Idaho GEM3 website (https://www.idahogem3.org), the overall goal of this project: "advance fundamental knowledge on the mechanisms that rule genome to phenome pathways to predict how species adapt to external stressors and a changing environment. It will help translate this knowledge into evidenced-based resource management policies and practices for more adaptive and resilient species and landscapes." "GEM3 is an NSF EPSCoR research program seeking to understand how genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity affect species response to environmental change, shaping both population response and adaptive capacity. Two focal taxa will be under study: one aquatic (redband trout) and one terrestrial (sagebrush). These taxa are integral to ecosystems in the American West, and are central to land-use management decisions that drive the economy of the region." "GEM3's research hypothesis is that the adaptive genetic diversity of populations will vary across key landscapes in predictable ways. This variation will then influence the adaptive capacity of populations."