Travis Gallo

Travis Gallo
George Mason University | GMU · Department of Environmental Science and Policy

PhD

About

26
Publications
7,546
Reads
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527
Citations
Introduction
I am an Assistant Professor of Urban Wildlife Ecology and Conservation in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy at George Mason University. Our lab uses theories and principles in ecology and conservation science to sustain and restore biodiversity in urban ecosystems. We work to understand how urban environments – both the physical and social – shape species distributions, populations, communities, and behaviors. Through our research, we hope to better understand fundamental ecological processes in urban ecosystems and apply this knowledge to future urban planning. Our goal is to provide evidence-based solutions that simultaneously conserve biological diversity and improve the lives of urban residents.
Additional affiliations
March 2010 - August 2010
Texas Audubon
Position
  • Contract Biologist
Description
  • Golden-cheeked warbler and Black-capped vireo surveys
October 2008 - January 2012
University of Texas at Austin
Position
  • Program Coordinator
Description
  • Program Coordinator for the Invaders of Texas Citizen Science Program.
Education
January 2012 - May 2016
Colorado State University
Field of study
  • Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology
January 2006 - May 2008
August 2001 - December 2005
Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi
Field of study
  • Field Biology

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
For over a century there have been continual efforts to incorporate nature into urban planning. These efforts – known as urban reconciliation– aim to manage and create habitats that support biodiversity within cities. Given that species select habitat at different spatial scales, understanding the scale at which urban species respond to their envir...
Article
Nature-based green infrastructure projects have become a common consideration in cities for the benefits they provide to humans. However, the co-benefits provided to wildlife are often assumed but not critically assessed. The value of green infrastructure for wildlife likely depends on the habitat requirements of a species and the spatial context o...
Article
Full-text available
As cities expand to accommodate a growing human population, their impacts to natural ecosystems and the wildlife residing within them increase. Some animals that persist in urban environments demonstrate behaviors distinct from their non-urban counterparts. These potential behavioral changes are the subject of a growing body of research in the area...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how biodiversity responds to urbanization is challenging, due in part to the single‐city focus of most urban ecological research. Here, we delineate continent‐scale patterns in urban species assemblages by leveraging data from a multi‐city camera trap survey and quantify how differences in greenspace availability and average housing d...
Article
Full-text available
Research on urban wildlife can help promote coexistence and guide future interactions between humans and wildlife in developed regions, but most such investigations are limited to short‐term, single‐species studies, typically conducted within a single city. This restricted focus prevents scientists from recognizing global patterns and first princip...
Article
Full-text available
Time is a fundamental component of ecological processes. How animal behavior changes over time has been explored through well-known ecological theories like niche partitioning and predator-prey dynamics. Yet, changes in animal behavior within the shorter 24-hour light-dark cycle have largely gone unstudied. Understanding if an animal can adjust the...
Preprint
Full-text available
Time is a fundamental component of ecological processes. How animal behavior changes over time has been explored through well-known ecological theories like niche partitioning and predator-prey dynamics. Yet, changes in animal behavior within the shorter 24-hour light-dark cycle have largely gone unstudied. Understanding if an animal can adjust the...
Article
As urbanization continues to expand across the globe, urban wildlife research is critical for urban planners and conservation practitioners to create livable cities for both humans and wildlife. In 2012, Magle et al. conducted a foundational review on the status of urban wildlife research. The authors described the status of urban wildlife research...
Article
In 1898, Herbert and Alice Walter started a 5-year survey of birds in Lincoln Park-the largest park in Chicago, Illinois-and summarized their data in an urban birding field guide, Wild Birds in City Parks. Twenty-nine years later, William Dreuth compared the relative frequency of species in the Walters' study to that in his own 5-year Lincoln Park...
Article
Urban biodiversity provides critical ecosystem services and is a key component to environmentally and socially sustainable cities. However, biodiversity varies greatly within and among cities, leading to human communities with changing and unequal experiences with nature. The "luxury effect," a hypothesis that predicts a positive correlation betwee...
Article
Full-text available
White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) are becoming increasingly common in urban environments. How they respond to potential changes (i.e. increased human interactions, traffic, overabundance) can influence herd health. We aimed to develop a technique that quantifies stress in deer using hair cortisol concentrations (HCC). Our objectives were t...
Article
Full-text available
1.Urbanization is considered the fastest growing form of global land use change, and can dramatically modify habitat structure and ecosystem functioning. While ecological processes continue to operate within cities, urban ecosystems are profoundly different from their more natural counterparts. Thus, ecological predictions derived from more natural...
Article
Full-text available
Careful design of the green spaces in cities will benefit both wild animals and humans.
Article
Ecological restoration is critical for recovering biodiversity and ecosystem services, yet designing interventions to achieve particular outcomes remains fraught with challenges. In the extensive regions where non-native species are firmly established, it is unlikely that historical conditions can be fully reinstated. To what degree, and how rapidl...
Article
Full-text available
As urban growth expands and natural environments fragment, it is essential to understand the ecological roles fulfilled by urban green spaces. To evaluate how urban green spaces function as wildlife habitat, we estimated mammal diversity and metacommunity dynamics in city parks, cemeteries, golf courses, and natural areas throughout the greater Chi...
Article
Using habitat mitigation to minimize or offset negative impacts of land use change on biodiversity is increasingly common and widespread. For example, where natural disturbance is undesirable (e.g., wildfire in oil and gas fields), mechanical approaches are frequently used to replace natural disturbance and improve habitat for particular species. H...
Article
Keynote and plenary speakers at professional conferences serve as highly visible role models for early-career scientists and provide recognition of scientific excellence. This recognition may be particularly important for women, who are underrepresented in senior positions in the biological sciences. To evaluate whether conferences fulfill this pot...
Article
Full-text available
Large-scale land-use change driven by residential development has degraded native ecosystems and altered the composition of species communities. Concern over the loss of habitat for human-sensitive species has led to questions about how housing impacts bird communities along the urban to rural gradient. Yet most studies of birds in residential ecos...
Article
Woodland reduction has been under way for decades to improve habitat for certain wildlife species, increase forage for livestock, improve watershed function and reduce soil erosion, and increase plant community heterogeneity. Land managers have implemented a variety of techniques to reduce woodlands. Yet most studies on outcomes are observational a...
Article
Forested ecosystems in the western United States have been the focus of tree reduction efforts for decades, with the intent of improving forage for livestock and wildlife. Yet, the long-term consequences of tree removal for biodiversity are virtually unknown. We conducted bird and vegetation surveys in northwestern Colorado where trees were mechani...
Article
Removing tree cover is a common forest management practice, and pinyon-juniper woodlands in the western United States have been the focus of tree reduction efforts for decades. The scale and intensity of tree removal practices are expected to increase as technology advances and as land managers are tasked with meeting multiple objectives, including...
Article
Habitat alteration to benefit hunted species has been implemented for centuries. These practices are most prevalent on public and private lands where management is funded through hunting licenses and hunting tourism. Habitat management for game species is globally widespread and can take diverse forms — e.g. tree reduction to enhance forage for dee...
Article
Scientists are increasingly using Twitter as a tool for communicating science. Twitter can promote scholarly discussion, disseminate research rapidly, and extend and diversify the scope of audiences reached. However, scientists also caution that if Twitter does not accurately convey science due to the inherent brevity of this media, misinformation...
Article
Full-text available
The Invaders of Texas program is a successful citizen science program in which volunteers survey and monitor invasive plants throughout Texas. Invasive plants are being introduced at alarming rates, and our limited knowledge about their distribution is a major cause for concern. The Invaders of Texas program trains citizen scientists to detect the...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Taking an ecosystem approach, we are using Chicago as a model to understand the distribution, behavior, and adaptations of urban wildlife.