Tracy Quan

Tracy Quan
University of Colorado Boulder | CUB · Department of Spanish and Portuguese

PhD

About

13
Publications
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Introduction
Tracy Quan is an assistant professor of Spanish Linguistics in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Colorado at Boulder. She researches identity construction and Spanish language development across contexts (immersion, classroom) and learner populations (additional/second, heritage/bilingual). She is particularly interested in how ideologies about language intersect with race, ethnicity, gender, and social class. To learn more about her work, go to: www.quantracy.com.

Publications

Publications (13)
Book
"Heritage Speakers of Spanish and Study Abroad" is an edited volume that provides emerging research on heritage speakers of Spanish in immersion contexts in theoretical, empirical, and programmatic terms. This edited collection seeks to expand our understanding of heritage speakers of Spanish by incorporating research on their linguistic, socioli...
Article
How multilinguals reflect on and interpret their experiences abroad as they acquire an additional language has been undertheorized in study abroad research. Multilinguals navigate multiple identities, cross linguistic and social boundaries, and employ an array of resources to make meaning—that is, they engage in translingual practice. This article...
Article
This action‐research study describes a course that emphasized critical language awareness (CLA)—an understanding of how language intersects with identity and power—for additional language (L2) learners of Spanish. As L2 learners have been shown to reproduce racist and monolingual discourses, educating them to recognize and question language ideolog...
Article
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In response to the technocratic nature of teacher preparation programs, teacher educators committed to social justice, like ourselves, have called for a shift towards training empathetic, reflective, and critically conscious professionals. This article describes how three teacher educators from different institutions and disciplines redesigned thei...
Article
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Why learners return from study abroad (SA) with varying degrees of second language (L2) gains or differing attitudes towards the target language and culture remains an open question. This study employs theories of identity (Kinginger, 2013) and investment (Darvin & Norton, 2015; Norton Peirce, 1995) to examine the case of three learners of Spanish...
Article
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Research (e.g., Wood, 2010a) suggests that study abroad (SA) and the use of formulaic language (FL), or sequences of words that tend to go together, aid L2 oral fluency. Nonetheless, there is conflicting evidence regarding whether quantity of L2 use abroad is a predictor of language outcomes. This article examines the acquisition of FL by US L2 lea...
Chapter
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Despite the growing number of Spanish heritage language learners (SHLL) in the U.S. who study abroad, the ways in which SHLLs interpret and evaluate their experiences abroad has been underexplored and undertheorized. Given their heritage language proficiency and linguistic identities, SHLLs interact with the study abroad context differently than L2...
Article
Full-text available
Despite institutional and national focus on the importance of study abroad (SA) in U.S. higher education, the number of students of color abroad is still disproportionately low (Institute of International Education, 2017). Moreover, there is limited literature examining how race and ethnicity shapes experiences abroad, despite SA research highlight...
Article
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Diálogos is an English/Spanish parent group at a bilingual school in California that offers language classes to parents of varying socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds. Situated within Yosso’s (2005) model of community cultural wealth, this case study argues that parents positively evaluate Diálogos as a space that builds community through langua...
Thesis
Full-text available
There is a common assumption that study abroad (SA) leads to greater fluency in a second language (L2) because it implies ample opportunities for engagement with target language (TL) speakers. However, what contributes to a learner sounding more or less fluent after SA and why SA is an affordance for some language learners and not others remain unr...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
This on-going project aims to explore several research questions: 1. How do language learners' of Spanish oral fluency (temporal and formulaic language) develop over the span of a period abroad? 2. How do language learners' identities (e.g., heritage, racial, ethnic, social class, gender, upbringing) interact dynamically with an abroad context to influence their language development? In turn, how does language learning influence their identities? 3. What attitudes and ideologies do language learners have about study abroad and host communities?
Project
The teaching of Spanish in the U.S. context is oftentimes complicit in its reproduction of monolingualism, whiteness, and racialized language ideologies regarding certain varieties of Spanish and the speakers who use them. Drawing on translingual frameworks, this work aims to reconceptualize and reimagine Spanish language pedagogy across four learning contexts--the classroom, study abroad, community-engaged learning, and language teacher education-- to be liberating, transformative, and inclusive.
Project
How do language teachers (pre-service, teaching assistants) of racially and linguistically-diverse backgrounds imagine their roles in the world language classroom? How do they negotiate their personal and professional identities and desires? What role does critical language teacher education play in providing identity options, especially for language teachers of color at predominantly white institutions?