Tracey L Adams

Tracey L Adams
The University of Western Ontario | UWO · Department of Sociology

PhD

About

81
Publications
15,844
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
944
Citations

Publications

Publications (81)
Article
Full-text available
This article has three aims. First, to reflect on how conceptualizations of the public interest may have shifted due to COVID-19. Second, to focus on the implications of regulatory responses for the health workforce and corresponding lessons as health leaders and systems transition from pandemic response to pandemic recovery. Third, to identify how...
Article
Background There is a lack of understanding of the ways in which patients can participate in their interprofessional teams (IPTs). Healthcare providers (HCPs) require further clarity on how patients can participate in such teams. Purpose This scoping review addressed the following question: “What is known about patient participation in IPTs and th...
Article
The COVID‐19 pandemic has drawn attention to the home as a work environment, but the focus has centered on the experiences of paid workers. Stay‐at‐home mothers (SAHMs), for whom the home was already a workplace, have received little attention. This article explores how pandemic‐induced lockdowns impacted SAHMs' working conditions and their experie...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic provoked a surge in demand for health services. To help meet this demand, governments and health profession regulators implemented regulatory policy change to enhance professional availability and flexibility. Some nations may have been better positioned to make such changes due to their systems of healthcare profession regula...
Article
Full-text available
Background Despite substantial implications for healthcare provider practice and patient outcomes, gender has yet to be systematically explored with regard to interprofessional operating room (OR) teamwork. We aimed to explore and describe how gender and additional social identity factors shape experiences and perceptions of teamwork in the OR. Me...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Virtual care is transforming the nature of healthcare, particularly with the accelerated shift to telehealth and virtual care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Health profession regulators face intense pressures to safely facilitate this type of healthcare while upholding their legislative mandate to protect the public. Challenges for healt...
Article
Health care providers are increasingly asked to work in interprofessional teams to enhance the care provided to and health outcomes of their patients. However, there is little evidence on how to include patients in meaningful roles on these teams to support their health monitoring and management. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into r...
Article
Full-text available
An extensive body of workplace learning literature documents the changing nature of professional learning, knowledge and work, but the tensions between the distinctive purposes and interests of professions and organizations have not received the same level of attention. The sociology of professions literature in contrast has paid an enormous amount...
Article
In light of the positive association between home-cooked meals and healthier diets, many recent health promotion strategies have encouraged the public to cook more often at home. However, class, race/ethnicity, and gender inequalities often intersect in shaping food practices and also impact who takes on the work involved in “feeding the family”. T...
Article
Full-text available
Background There is no widespread agreement over what form healthcare professional regulation should take, and the evidence base concerning the effectiveness and fairness of regulatory systems and practices is limited. Those urging policy change argue there is a need to modernize; however, there is much we can learn from reviewing the history of he...
Article
This essay is composed of commentaries from four scholars critically evaluating Noordegraaf’s article ‘Protective or Connective Professionalism? How Connected Professionals Can (Still) Act as Autonomous and Authoritative Experts’. All four scholars, in different ways and from their different perspectives, question the dichotomy at the heart of Noor...
Article
Full-text available
In this essay, four leading scholars provide critical commentary on an article entitled ‘Protective or Connective Professionalism? How Connected Professionals Can (Still) Act as Autonomous and Authoritative Experts’ (Noordegraaf, 2020, Journal of Professions and Organization, 7/2). Of central concern to all four commentators is Noordegraaf’s use of...
Article
Given their positions of public trust, regulated professions are legally required to uphold ethical standards, and ensure that professional practice protects the public. Nonetheless, there is ample evidence that professionals do not always behave ethically. One proposed solution is greater organizational surveillance; however, research from a neo-W...
Article
A plethora of studies have documented the changing nature of professional work and the organizations in which it takes place. Among the most documented trends are the emergence of managerial–professional hybrid workers and professional (re)stratification. Although the links between these two trends have been noted, their interconnections have not b...
Article
Full-text available
This paper outlines a neo-Weberian approach to state-sponsored social closure in professional formation. Despite its advantages, state decision-making is not typically well-defined or examined in neo-Weberian analyses. Neo-Weberianism is differentiated from Max Weber’s own work on social action and rationality, which generally provides a more subtl...
Article
Full-text available
Sociologists have paid little attention to the shifting significance of gender to professional work. Nevertheless, there is evidence that the meanings attached to gender, and the gendering of work, have shifted over time, such that the experiences of newer cohorts of professionals differ from those of professionals in previous generations. In this...
Book
Gender, Age and Inequality in the Professions explores men’s and women’s experiences of professional work and careers through an intersectional lens by focusing on the intersection of gender and age. The chapters explore different professions – including Medicine, Nursing, Law, Academia, Information Technology and Engineering – in different Western...
Chapter
This concluding chapter summarises the theoretical contributions of the chapters and their significance for understanding and theorising age and gender inequalities in professions. It then discusses implications of these findings for research on professions, and identifies promising directions for future research. The chapter ends with a section on...
Chapter
The introduction is a theoretical chapter that outlines the frameworks within which the chapters are situated. By placing young professionals in the context of the transformations ongoing in the professional world, this chapter presents the arguments for studying gendering processes among young professionals and between different age cohorts/genera...
Article
Full-text available
Professions now operate in a more critical modern Western societal context. This has typically led to a major political challenge by the state to the self-regulation of such groups. It is argued, though, that the reasons for this are more complex than a knee-jerk reaction to the growing number of emerging professional scandals. Accordingly, tools a...
Article
The regulation of foot health care professionals varies across provinces in Canada. In Ontario, the regulated health profession is chiropody. Chiropodists are foot specialists with a limited scope of practice. In contrast, British Columbia and five other provinces regulate podiatrists, who are highly trained foot physicians with an extensive scope...
Article
This article explores trends in professional self-regulation in the UK, USA, and Canada. In each nation, professional self-regulation has come under attack. Critics charge that it inhibits competition, is unable to regulate transnational work effectively, and it facilitates professional misconduct. If left to their own devices, self-regulating prof...
Article
Full-text available
The regulation of professional groups has often been justified as being in the public interest. In recent decades, policymakers in Anglo-American countries have questioned whether self-regulating professions have truly served the public interest, or whether they have merely acted in their own interests. This paper draws on legislative records and p...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
More Canadians are working in professional jobs (Livingstone 2014). Since professional work has long been highly skilled, high-paying and secure, this appears to be good news for Canadian workers. There are signs, however, that the nature of professional work has been changing. As part of a broader study exploring changes to professions and work in...
Article
Past studies have focused on inter-professional conflict and its implication for professional status and work. However, there is a dearth of research on intra-professional conflict and its implications for professions. This study explores intra-professional conflicts among nurses in Ontario, using a qualitative research design, drawing on in-depth...
Article
Purpose: To assess performance differences in a mock job interview and workplace role-play exercise for youth with disabilities compared to their typically developing peers. Methods: We evaluated a purposive sample of 31 youth (15 with a physical disability and 16 typically developing) on their performance (content and delivery) in employment re...
Article
This paper explores the development and regulation of naturopathy in two Canadian provinces, Ontario and British Columbia, prior to 1950. Naturopathy has been a regulated profession in British Columbia since 1936. In Ontario the regulated group, since 1926 until recently, has been ‘drugless therapy.’ Through a comparative case study we not only doc...
Article
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the extent to which youth with physical disabilities encounter different barriers to finding employment compared to their typically developing peers. Method: This study draws on 50 qualitative in-depth interviews with a purposive sample of 31 youth (16 typically developing and 15 with a disability),...
Article
This paper examines why some small firms offer Flexible Workplace Policies (FWPs) while others do not and what factors contribute to the offering and use of FWPs within small firms. A multiple case study is employed using multiple data sources on seventeen information technology (IT) small firms in Canada. Findings reveal three types of firms with...
Article
This paper examines why some small firms offer Flexible Workplace Policies (FWPs) while others do not and what factors contribute to the offering and use of FWPs within small firms. A multiple case study is employed using multiple data sources on seventeen information technology (IT) small firms in Canada. Findings reveal three types of firms with...
Article
This paper explores citizenship requirements for entry to practice regulated professions historically in four Canadian provinces. It reviews how common citizenship restrictions have been in Canadian professions, when and where they were implemented, and what rationales were provided for these restrictions. Findings provide support for both Weberian...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract This paper reports on the process of developing a community-based interprofessional team to provide diabetes related foot ulcer care. A new interprofessional team was formed in a local community, and the process of building a successful team was examined by the adoption of an exploratory qualitative case study approach that gathered a seri...
Article
Today’s youth face high unemployment and other labor-market challenges; these challenges are often worse for youth with disabilities. This paper explores what employers and employment counselors look for when hiring youth into entry-level jobs and whether they believe youth with disabilities have fewer 15 skills than those without. This study used...
Article
This article considers points of convergence and divergence in English-language publications in the sociology of professions. While research on professions in the US, UK, Canada and Western Europe shares many similarities, UK researchers have devoted more attention to professional regulation, while their US counterparts focus instead on organizatio...
Article
In the early twentieth century, a number of alternative health practices grew in popularity. The most popular of them all, especially in Ontario, was osteopathy. In the 1910s and 1920s a dynamic osteopathy profession emerged in Canada and made significant strides towards achieving professional status. In the end, professional leaders were unsuccess...
Article
Abstract Most research exploring employers’ views of hiring workers with disabilities focuses on adults while little is known about employers’ experiences of working with disabled youth. The purpose of this study was to explore employers’ views of supervising an adolescent with a disability as a part of an employment training program. Employers (n...
Article
Relatively little is known about the first employment experiences and skill development of youth with disabilities. The purpose of this study is to explore the skills gained by adolescents with disabilities who have completed an employment-training program. In-depth, qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 adolescents with a p...
Article
There is a growing body of research on African Canadians in the 19th century that touches on their experiences in the workforce. Nonetheless, the literature has been largely silent on how labour market opportunities for African Canadians altered over time and, in particular, how members of this community fared with the slow, but nonetheless dramati...
Article
It is commonly believed that married women in Canada did not typically participate in the labour force a century ago. In The Business of Women, Melanie Buddle challenges this view by showing that in British Columbia in the early 20th century, it was not unusual for married women to support their families through self-employment and business ownersh...
Article
Within health care, there has long been a gender division of professional labor: men have predominated in higher-status, higher-paying professions like medicine and dentistry, while women’s health care work has been clustered in so-called support occupations such as nursing. Historically, health care professions were gendered, and beliefs about gen...
Article
Il a toujours été problématique de conceptualiser les professions puisque les caractéristiques professionnelles varient beaucoup dans le temps et dans l'espace. Cet article analyse les façons selon lesquelles les professions et les occupations ont été délimitées historiquement dans la législation. Un regard sur la réglementation professionnelle de...
Article
This essay looks at the regulation of professions in five Canadian provinces-Nova Scotia, Quebec, Ontario, Saskatchewan, and British Columbia-from Confederation to 1961 to examine the ways in which professional regulation has historically varied across locale. Interprovincial variations in the timing and content of legislation regulating profession...
Article
This essay looks at the regulation of professions in five Canadian provinces-Nova Scotia, Quebec, Ontario, Saskatchewan, and British Columbia-from Confederation to 1961 to examine the ways in which professional regulation has historically varied across locale. Interprovincial variations in the timing and content of legislation regulating profession...
Article
There is a growing body of literature exploring the relationship between regulated professions and the state. Research has shown that the state is the key source of power for professions, and it has suggested that professions may support and assist state agencies and actors in many ways. Although studies have documented changing state-profession re...
Article
Full-text available
The gendered nature of organizations limits women's opportunities for advancement. While women have made inroads into many male-dominated jobs, studies suggest they can be marginalized within masculine workplace cultures. In this paper, we examine the experiences of eleven women who have had successful careers in the male-dominated information tech...
Article
This article explores the conditions under which interprofessional relations may be characterized by conflict and/or cooperation through a case study of the rise of a software engineering (SWE) profession in the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada. Analysis of professional journal publications produced by the primary computing organizations i...
Book
This textbook provides an overview of the organization and experience of work in Canadian society, through an intersectional lens.
Article
Full-text available
In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the Ontario legislature received many petitions from individuals who could not meet the requirements for entry to practice established by professional bodies. Petitioners sought legislation that would waive certain requirements and grant them the right to practise regardless. These private bills...
Article
The potential impact of feminization upon professions is examined through a case study of the Ontario dental profession. Women are entering dentistry in larger numbers, and if women practice differently than men, then their increased participation may alter the nature of dental practice. Using data from a survey of dentists in Ontario conducted in...
Article
Abstract  While states are clearly crucial to the establishment and regulation of professions, there is little consensus over the nature of the relationship between professions and the state. This paper explores profession-state relations, through a case study of the Ontario government's historical practice of granting individual petitioners the ri...
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores the educational experience and professional practice of women who entered the dental profession in Ontario in the 1920s. During this period, dentists were educated in Toronto: initially, at a school affiliated with the University of Toronto, and after 1925, at the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto. While few women ente...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined Ontario dentists' and dental hygienists' attitudes to independent dental hygiene practice and changing the scope of practice. Data were collected from a mail survey of a systematic, stratified sample of Ontario dentists (483 respondents) and dental hygienists (437 respondents) conducted in the winter and spring of 2002 to assess...
Article
In Ontario, Canada, an inter-professional struggle is occurring between the professions of dentistry and dental hygiene over who should be the primary oral health care provider for the public; that is, when someone seeks dental treatment, who should they see first? This conflict has been spurred by recent changes in the regulation of health care pr...
Article
This article explores hegemonic and counterhegemonic ideas of masculinity as seen through the political campaigns and programmatic appeals of the Knights of Labor (KOL) in Ontario, 1882 to 1890. The KOL was a movement that sought to unite the working class in opposition to the exploitation of elites. Central to the KOL’s opposition was the creation...
Article
This paper explores the influence of gender and feminism on the professional projects of female-dominated professions, through a case study of dental hygiene in Ontario. Full professional status has eluded many female-dominated professions, including dental hygiene. Historically, dental hygiene was defined as work for women, to be performed strictl...
Article
Historically, prevailing gender ideologies were an important element in both the exclusionary strategies employed by male occupational groups and the countervailing responses by female groups. The way in which evolving gender ideologies, and feminism in particular, influence the continuing struggle for greater status and recognition by female profe...
Article
Tout comme les lieux de travail, les organisations connaissent actuellement des changements drastiques. Au cours des dernières années, les petites et grandes entreprises ont procédé à des restructurations: redéfinition des postes de travail, modifications à l'interne et changement des attentes au plan de l'emploi. Cet article a pour objectif de vér...
Book
This book is about the rise of the dental profession in Ontario. It explores how early Ontario dentists structured and defined their profession to achieve their economic and social goals. In establishing dentistry as a profession, these men sought to fulfill not only their desire for a middle-class status, but also to establish their manhood. They...
Article
In this study, I explore the relationship between medicine and dentistry in Ontario between 1868 and 1918. Examination of the rise of dentistry and medical-dental relations reveals that medicine never came to dominate dentistry to the extent it did other health care occupations. The combination of four factors enabled dentistry to avoid outright me...
Article
This study examines the relationship between gender, class, and race through a case study of the Ontario, Canada dental profession in the first two decades of the twentieth century. During this time period dentists endeavored to solidify their claims to professional status by defining their relations with patients, the public, and with dental assis...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (8)
Archived project
This project explores the emergence of osteopathic manual practice in Ontario, and its linkages with similar developments in other provinces and nations. It involves interviews with practitioners, and an understanding of professional developments and change.
Archived project
The project explores the changing nature of work in Canada. Special focus is on professional work. As part of this project, I am exploring changes within Ontario's engineering profession.