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Tove Skutnabb-Kangas

Tove Skutnabb-Kangas

PhD
PLEASE don't contact me via Research Gate!!! Write an email if you have something important to say. Sorry. Tove

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205
Publications
170,378
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4,781
Citations
Introduction
PLEASE do not start "following" me!! I do not update Research Gate anymore. Go to my home page (www-Tove-Skutnabb-Kangas.org), then go to "All publications". There are many more of my publications for free downloading than on ResearchGate, and more to come (as many as I have in a digital form, meaning several hundreds). Tove.

Publications

Publications (205)
Book
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This publication contains excerpts from laws that regulate the right to education in the mother tongue of minorities in the practice of those states to which the territory of modern Transcarpathia belonged from 1867 until the declaration of Ukraine's independence. Also cited are legislative acts of sovereign Ukraine, which granted the right to repr...
Article
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Aiming at the maintenance of biodiversity and healthy ecosystem in the world – vital issues of the 21st century – it is important to preserve linguistic diversity and prevent the increasing language endangerment, thus ensuring the support of linguistic human rights. The author presents a comprehensive explanation of the key terms related to linguis...
Chapter
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Are Indigenous and minority children guaranteed a right to learn both their own languages and at least a/the dominant language in their country of residence, up to a high formal level, through bilingual education of various kinds, most importantly including a right to mother-tongue-based multilingual (MTM) education (see Skutnabb-Kangas and McCarty...
Chapter
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In this chapter, we summarize the arguments underpinning the recognition of linguistic human rights (LHRs) as key human rights. While there is ongoing skepticism about the recognition of LHRs, particularly among individual nation-states, there is an emerging jurisprudence in international law supporting LHRs. These developments provide – at least p...
Chapter
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Kontra, Miklós, Lewis, Paul, Skutnabb-Kangas, Tove (2016). Afterword: disendangering languages. In Johanna Laakso, Anneli Sarhimaa, Sia Spiliopoulos Åkermark and Reetta Toivanen (eds). Multilingualism beyond rhetorics: towards openly multilingual policies and practices in Europe. Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 217-233. ISBN 9781783094950.
Book
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see Table of Contents
Research
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This file has the Table of contents for our edited book (four volumes, 1668 pages) called Language Rights
Data
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Chapter
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The present text is an updated and extended version of the chapter on "Minority Protection and Lesser Used Language Promotion: The Convention on the Future of the European Union" published in Nic Craith, Máiréad (ed.): Language, power and identity politics. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 83-100.
Chapter
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Are Indigenous and minority children guaranteed a right to learn both their own languages and at least a/the dominant language in their country of residence, up to a high formal level, through bilingual education of various kinds, most importantly including a right to mother-tongue-based multilingual (MTM) education (see Skutnabb-Kangas and McCarty...
Chapter
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Most education systems worldwide for Indigenous/tribal peoples, autochthonous, immigrant and refugee minorities, and minoritized groups involve linguicism. Many people recognize spontaneously the concept and the phenomena it identifies as soon as they hear the label. This entry will try to elaborate the concept somewhat more than in the definition.
Article
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The article explores some aspects of the way the dominance of scientific English is being consolidated at the expense of (speakers of) other languages. Our examples to shed light on this phenomenon are drawn from three fields: - the limitations of the parochial monolingualism of US academia, exemplified by scholarly writing on bilingual education,...
Chapter
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Introduction to Debi Prasanna Pattanayak's writings. xix-xxix
Book
The book tells the story of the Indigenous Aanaar Saami language (around 350 speakers) and cultural revitalisation in Finland. It offers a new language revitalisation method that can be used with Indigenous and minority languages, especially in cases where the native language has been lost among people of a working age. The book gives practical exa...
Conference Paper
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This was an Invited Lecture of 3 hours; CABE presented me with their Vision Award
Article
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Linguistic human rights (LHR) can be defined as “only those language rights . . . which are so basic for a dignified life that everybody has them because of being human; therefore, in principle no state (or individual) is allowed to violate them” (e.g., Skutnabb-Kangas, 2008, p. 109; see Skutnabb-Kangas, in press-a, for a discussion of definitions)...
Chapter
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Human rights lawyer Fernand de Varennes (see also 1996) writes on the back cover of Multilingual Education for Social Justice: Globalising the Local (Mohanty, Panda, Phillipson, & Skutnabb-Kangas, 2009), that the book “addresses directly a still surprisingly controversial topic: the indisputable value of education in one's own language. Keywords:...
Chapter
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Professor James (Jim) Patrick Cummins (born July 3, 1949, in Dublin, Ireland) is one of the world's most influential researchers in bilingualism studies.
Article
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The study of linguistic imperialism focuses on how and why certain languages dominate internationally, and attempts to account for such dominance in a theoretically informed way. United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)'s Interactive Atlas of the World's Languages in Danger divides the total of 2,581 endangered lang...
Article
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Skutnabb-Kangas agrees here with Fishman in asserting the important place that power holds in cultural autonomy. But, at the same time, Skutnabb-Kangasdisagrees with Fishman's optimistic claims regarding the growing acceptance of the right of Indigenous/tribal peoples and minorities/minoritized groups to public resources to operate institutions in...
Article
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The TESOL Quarterly welcomes evaluative reviews of publications relevant to TESOL professionals. In addition to textbooks and reference materials, these include computer and video software, testing instruments, and other forms of nonprint materials.
Chapter
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Genuine peaceful contact presupposes a mutual will to try to understand the other party's signed or spoken signals and symbols; to accommodate, and to learn at least some of them (often using a pidgin, an auxiliary simplified language), or to learn a common lingua franca, foreign to both. For dominant groups, their own rights have often been, and s...
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Prospects for the World's LanguagesFrom Colonization to Corporate GlobalizationLinguistic Neo-ImperialismWhy Are Languages ‘Disappearing’? The Role of Formal EducationLinguistic Genocide and Crimes against Humanity in EducationLinguistic and Cultural Diversity and Biodiversity: Correlational and Causal RelationshipsLinguistic Human Rights in Market...
Article
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When ‘races’ were defined on the basis of purportedly biological criteria and when various psychological characteristics were linked with the resulting ‘races’ (which were thus hierarchised), researchers participated in this definition process. ‘Races’ were socially constructed, and the constructions were used to legitimate an unequal division of p...
Book
Only a few hundred of the world's 6,000-7,000 languages have any kind of official status, and it is only speakers of official languages (speakers of dominant majority languages) who enjoy all linguistic human rights. As many of the collected papers in this book document, most linguistic minorities are deprived of these rights. This book describes w...
Chapter
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IntroductionHistorical and Global ContextualizationPolitics and/or Policy?Linguistic Human Rights, Linguistic Diversity, and Language Maintenance in and through Education: Issues of Language Policy and PoliticsLanguage Policy, Exemplified by the European RegionReferencesFurther Reading
Book
The book deals with how using several languages in education can contribute to greater social justice. The book shows that multilingual education is just for all. Experts from all continents who have contributed to this book show how mother-tongue based multilingual education does enable indigenous/tribal minority and marginalised children to succe...
Article
Subtractive education through the medium of a dominant language often transfers Indigenous and minority (IM) children to the dominant group linguistically and culturally within one or two generations. It may lead to the extinction of Indigenous languages, thus contributing to the disappearance of the world's linguistic diversity. A partial result o...
Book
The principles for enabling children to become fully proficient multilinguals through schooling are well known. Even so, most indigenous/tribal, minority and marginalised children are not provided with appropriate mother-tongue-based multilingual education (MLE) that would enable them to succeed in school and society. In this book experts from arou...
Article
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This article describes, compares, and analyzes two educational situations for Kurds from the point of view of linguistic human rights, using prodigious exemplification. In Turkey, Kurdish-medium schools are not allowed, and Kurdish children do not even have the right to study their mother tongue as a subject in school. In addition to physical genoc...
Chapter
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Why Should We be Concerned about Endangered Languages?Why are Languages Endangered?What is Being Done to Counter Language Endangerment?Evaluation of Present Measures: Too Little too Late?What does the Future Hold for Endangered Languages?
Chapter
This article presents some basic language rights concepts (individual and group rights, rights of/in organizations and states, binding and nonbinding rights, principles of personality and territoriality). Linguistic human rights (LHRs) combine language rights and human rights (HRs). Language is treated in a less generous manner in human rights inst...
Article
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It is unfortunate that Wee's commendable effort (2005) to explore the theoretical underpinning of Linguistic Human Rights (LHRs) so as to explore different variants of English in Singapore empirically is marred by a substantial number of misrepresentations of what is stated in our work. We will exemplify this briefly, and otherwise refer the reader...
Article
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Scientific imperialism involves outsiders creating knowledge about dominated groups. This applies to the relationship between indigenous or minority children, parents, teachers and communities on the one hand, and dominant groups (schools, teachers/administrators, us as researchers) on the other hand. How can we as outsiders work together with othe...
Article
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Summary This report shows that educational models for indigenous and minority children which use mainly dominant languages as languages of instruction can and do have extremely negative consequences for the achievement of goals deduced from central human rights instruments and thus for the right to education. We use arguments and research results f...
Article
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Encyclopedia article
Book
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What does the right to communicate mean to millions of people marginalised by the political and economic self-interests of the North? How is concentration of media ownership threatening political activism and cultural diversity? What needs to be done to tackle the causes of the digital divide? How can the right to communicate guarantee equal access...
Article
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This short article situates the following two papers (by David Klaus and by Yasuko Nagai and Ronah Lister) on Papua New Guinea in the context of discussions about maintenance and revitalisation of endangered languages, and about education through the medium of indigenous and minority languages. Two of the three authors represent organisations (the...
Article
This paper looks at policies of linguistic expansion worldwide, in particular at English in the colonial and postcolonial periods. It addresses the issue of whether the expansion of English in continental Europe represents a threat or a blessing. It considers some of the ambiguities in English being promoted, particularly in connection with ESL exp...
Article
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The attachment that many peoples have to their language is clear from the fact that it often becomes a symbol of their very existence (see, e.g. Fishman 1997). This is what makes this field interdisciplinary and vital for human rights but difficult to limit to traditional empirical research. There are elements of identity, access issues, and questi...
Article
The rejoinder is a reply to Jan Blommaert's review of Tove Skutnabb-Kangas' book Linguistic Genocide in Education-or Worldwide Diversity and Human Rights? It points out some of the worst misinformation in the review and discusses some paradigmatic issues that separate Blommaert and Skutnabb-Kangas. These include seeing language death as sad but som...
Article
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My question in this article is: Can a human rights (HRs) approach to language planning and policy promote educational equity for diverse student populations? After claiming that most of the present indigenous and minority education in the world fits the United Nations definitions of linguistic genocide, turning dominant languages into killer langua...

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Question
Dr Tove Skutnabb-Kangas, email: SkutnabbKangas followed by @gmail.com; home page: www.tove-skutnabb-kangas.org. The latest book: Skutnabb-Kangas, Tove &  Phillipson, Robert  (eds) (2017). Language Rights. London/New York: Routledge. Series Critical Concepts in Language Studies. 4 volumes, 1.668 pp. For other recent books, see http://www.tove-skutnabb-kangas.org/en/most_recent_books.html; see also my "Articles in press" on my home page.Check out new books in my MM series, www.Multilingualmatters.co.uk/; go to Series, then Linguistic Diversity and Language Rights.

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Projects (5)
Project
I have not added anything on Research Gate for a long time and will never do it anymore. PLEASE go to my home page instead! www.Tove-Skutnabb-Kangas.org - It has much more and I (and Stefano Keller) are adding my latest (and also old) publications there! So, don't follow me on Research Gate!, Tove
Project
Stefano Keller has started putting my publications on to my home page, to be downloaded free of charge. The first 90 went there 12 February. UPDATE :-now - 11 Sept 2020 - there are over 200, more coming. If you are interested, go to http://www.tove-skutnabb-kangas.org/en/all_publications.html and then look at the ones where there is a link. There will be hundreds more when Stefano and I have the time. Thanks, Stefano! Go also to his www.linguistic-rights.org