Toon Bongers

Toon Bongers
Ghent University | UGhent · Department of History

Master of Arts in Archaeology

About

6
Publications
1,257
Reads
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1
Citation
Citations since 2017
5 Research Items
1 Citation
20172018201920202021202220230.00.51.01.52.0
20172018201920202021202220230.00.51.01.52.0
20172018201920202021202220230.00.51.01.52.0
20172018201920202021202220230.00.51.01.52.0
Introduction
Toon Bongers is a PhD researcher at the Ancient History department at Ghent University. His research focuses on the role of waterways in the Roman-era transport system of the Scheldt and Meuse basin. The project reconstructs the past transport network and applies GIS-based spatial network analysis to reveal regional differences in transport time, cost, and accessibility. Results are compared with published archaeological and historical data.
Additional affiliations
March 2018 - present
Ghent University
Position
  • Assistant
Description
  • Assisting first year course 'Historical Practice I: Antiquity'
May 2017 - May 2021
Ghent University
Position
  • Researcher
Education
September 2015 - February 2016
KU Leuven
Field of study
  • Archaeology

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
Full-text available
Archaeological sources make it impossible to deny that rivers served as pathways in the past. Conversely, the role of inland waterways in the Roman transport economy of northern Gaul has received little scholarly attention. This paper introduces a historical-archaeological study of the transport network of the Roman-era Scheldt basin (present day n...
Article
Full-text available
Historical-archaeological research has argued that waterways were the most efficient means of transporting goods. Nevertheless, little systematic research has been done on the use of waterways in northern Gaul. This study assesses the potential of the river Scheldt as a transport corridor. It starts with a general characterisation of the river basi...
Poster
Full-text available
Archaeological sources make it impossible to deny that rivers served as pathways in the past. However, the role of inland waterways in the Roman transport economy of northern Gaul, with exception of the river Rhine, has received little scholarly attention. This paper fills a current gap in academic research by studying the structure and behaviour o...
Presentation
Full-text available
Presentation for the workshop 'Travel and Transport through Time - I. Data and Methodologies to Model the movement of goods in Roman Times'. Organisers: Pau de Soto & Daniel Alves (Universidade Nova de Lisboa) Place & Date: Lisboa – Universidade Nova de Lisboa / Monday, 10th September of 2018 Description Study and analyse historical periods econ...
Poster
Full-text available
A doctoral colloquium for the PhD-students of the Faculty of Arts of the University of Ghent
Thesis
Archaeologists have often, under the influence of evolutionary and neo-evolutionary ideas, described societal dynamics in linear terms. This linear description of societal dynamics neglects much of the cultural, economic and social variation in the archaeological record. Under the influence of scientific disciplines such as ecology, a need has emer...

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Scholars usually concurr that transport by rivers and lakes greatly stimulated the development of trade in the Roman empire. The contribution of rivers and lakes to transport networks is mostly treated in a matter of fact way. This is not an unproblematic view, however, waterways require investment, regulation and control. They are as much man-made as roads are. Without tow-paths, canals, locks, connecting roads, ports and warehouses rivers offer only a marginal contribution to trade. This project will study the institutional conditions governing navigation on rivers and lakes, and the resource requirements for and effects of Roman riverine and lake navigation. Our approach is inspired by complexity economics, which analyses economics systems as dynamic networks of autonomous agents. We combine a social network analysis and a spatial network analysis to study the institutions, agents and spatial structures in the Rhone/Saone river basin and in the river basins of Scheldt and Meuse. Both areas differed institutionally and ecologically, but were interconnected via the Rhine and were part of a larger transport network linking the Mediterranean to the North Sea area.