Tommaso Jucker

Tommaso Jucker
The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation | CSIRO · Land and Water

PhD

About

66
Publications
60,636
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
4,304
Citations
Citations since 2016
52 Research Items
4092 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220200400600800
20162017201820192020202120220200400600800
20162017201820192020202120220200400600800
20162017201820192020202120220200400600800
Introduction
My research is broadly focused on understanding what determines the composition, structure and function of forest ecosystems, in an effort to predict how these will respond to rapid environmental change. I am particularly interested in combining empirical field-based approaches with novel remote sensing technologies to address challenges at the nexus of biodiversity conservation and sustainable development.
Additional affiliations
October 2011 - present
University of Cambridge

Publications

Publications (66)
Article
Making oil palm agriculture as efficient as possible is essential to ensuring that this economically important crop can be grown sustainably. To determine how oil palm growth rates vary across tropical landscapes, we used repeat airborne LiDAR data to map the height growth of >500,000 oil palms in Malaysian Borneo over a two-year period coinciding...
Article
Full-text available
Canopy gaps are openings in the forest canopy resulting from branch fall and tree mortality events. The geographical distribution of large canopy gaps may reflect underlying variation in mortality and growth processes. However, a lack of data at the appropriate scale has limited our ability to study this relationship until now. We detected canopy g...
Article
Full-text available
The latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG) is one of the most recognized global patterns of species richness exhibited across a wide range of taxa. Numerous hypotheses have been proposed in the past two centuries to explain LDG, but rigorous tests of the drivers of LDGs have been limited by a lack of high-quality global species richness data. Here we...
Article
Full-text available
Data capturing multiple axes of tree size and shape, such as a tree's stem diameter, height and crown size, underpin a wide range of ecological research - from developing and testing theory on forest structure and dynamics, to estimating forest carbon stocks and their uncertainties, and integrating remote sensing imagery into forest monitoring prog...
Article
Full-text available
Temperature change is an often‐assumed, but rarely‐tested, mechanism by which sensitive species may decline in forest landscapes following habitat degradation, fragmentation and destruction. Traits mediate how species respond to environmental change, with physiological, morphological and behavioural traits key to determining the response of ectothe...
Article
Full-text available
One of the most fundamental questions in ecology is how many species inhabit the Earth. However, due to massive logistical and financial challenges and taxonomic difficulties connected to the species concept definition, the global numbers of species, including those of important and well-studied life forms such as trees, still remain largely unknow...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Tree diversity is fundamental for forest ecosystem stability and services. However, because of limited available data, estimates of tree diversity at large geographic domains still rely heavily on published lists of species descriptions that are geographically uneven in coverage. These limitations have precluded efforts to generate a g...
Article
Tree species diversity promotes multiple ecosystem functions and services. However, little is known about how above- and belowground resource availability (light, nutrients, and water) and resource uptake capacity mediate tree species diversity effects on aboveground wood productivity and temporal stability of productivity in European forests and w...
Preprint
Full-text available
Canopy gaps are openings in the forest canopy resulting from branch fall and tree mortality events. Light reaches the lower layers of the canopy through these gaps, enabling understory trees to grow and maintaining the high heterogeneity and biodiversity of tropical forests. The size-frequency distribution of canopy gaps follows a power-law distrib...
Article
Forest degradation through logging is pervasive throughout the world’s tropical forests, leading to changes in the three‐dimensional canopy structure that have profound consequences for wildlife, microclimate and ecosystem functioning. Quantifying these structural changes is fundamental to understanding the impact of degradation, but is challenging...
Article
The plant-soil interactions may drive the diversity and functioning of forests, but we do not fully understand how interrelationships between plant and soil compartments are underlined by multiple ecological mechanisms. Here, we hypothesize that positive plant-soil interactions enhance biodiversity and functioning in a temperate forest. To do so, w...
Article
Full-text available
The past 40 years in Southeast Asia have seen about 50% of lowland rainforests converted to oil palm and other plantations, and much of the remaining forest heavily logged. Little is known about how fragmentation influences recovery and whether climate change will hamper restoration. Here, we use repeat airborne LiDAR surveys spanning the hot and d...
Book
Full-text available
the full text can be found at: https://lpvs.gsfc.nasa.gov/PDF/CEOS_WGCV_LPV_Biomass_Protocol_2021_V1.0.pdf
Article
Full-text available
Aim Tree crowns determine light interception, carbon and water exchange. Thus, understanding the factors causing tree crown allometry to vary at the tree and stand level matters greatly for the development of future vegetation modelling and for the calibration of remote sensing products. Nevertheless, we know little about large‐scale variation and...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: Tree crowns determine light interception, carbon and water exchange. Thus, understanding the factors causing tree crown allometry to vary at the tree and stand level matters greatly for the development of future vegetation modelling and for the calibration of remote sensing products. Nevertheless, we know little about large‐scale variation and...
Article
Full-text available
The application of metabarcoding to environmental and invertebrate‐derived DNA (eDNA and iDNA) is a new and increasingly applied method for monitoring biodiversity across a diverse range of habitats. This approach is particularly promising for sampling in the biodiverse humid tropics, where rapid land‐use change for agriculture means there is a gro...
Article
Large trees, as the versatile provider of ecosystem services, are the most susceptible to episodic disturbance regimes such as extreme climate and biotic agents across the globe, and hence, largely determine forest demographic processes. Despite the recognized fundamental ecological significance of large-diameter trees to above-ground biomass (AGB)...
Article
Full-text available
1. There is growing interest in the ecological value of set-aside habitats around rivers in tropical agriculture. These riparian buffers typically comprise forest or other non-production habitat, and are established to maintain water quality and hydrological processes, while also supporting biodiversity, ecosystem function and landscape connectivit...
Article
Long‐term grassland biodiversity experiments have shown that diversity effects on productivity tend to strengthen through time, as complementarity among coexisting species increases. But it remains less clear whether this pattern also holds for other ecosystems such as forests, and if so why. Here we explore whether diversity effects on tree growth...
Article
Full-text available
Structurally intact tropical forests sequestered about half of the global terrestrial carbon uptake over the 1990s and early 2000s, removing about 15 per cent of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions. Climate-driven vegetation models typically predict that this tropical forest ‘carbon sink’ will continue for decades. Here we assess trends in the c...
Article
1.Tree diversity has been shown to promote a broad range of ecosystem functions in forests. However, how important these effects are in driving ecosystem multifunctionality in natural forests, relative to other drivers, such as below‐ground biodiversity (e.g., soil microbial diversity), community‐level functional traits and environmental conditions...
Article
Full-text available
Logging and habitat fragmentation impact tropical forest ecosystems in numerous ways, perhaps the most striking of which is by altering the temperature, humidity, and light environment of the forest—its microclimate. Because local-scale microclimatic conditions directly influence the physiology, demography and behavior of most species, many of the...
Article
Full-text available
Logging, pervasive across the lowland tropics, affects millions of hectares of forest, yet its influence on nutrient cycling remains poorly understood. One hypothesis is that logging influences phosphorus (P) cycling, because this scarce nutrient is removed in extracted timber and eroded soil, leading to shifts in ecosystem functioning and communit...
Article
Full-text available
Both niche and stochastic dispersal processes structure the extraordinary diversity of tropical plants, but determining their relative contributions has proven challenging. We address this question using airborne imaging spectroscopy to estimate canopy β‐diversity for an extensive region of a Bornean rainforest and challenge these data with models...
Article
Full-text available
For decades, ecologists have investigated the effects of tree species diversity on tree productivity at different scales and with different approaches ranging from observational to experimental study designs. Using data from five European national forest inventories (16,773 plots), six tree species diversity experiments (584 plots), and six network...
Article
Full-text available
There is an increasing need to understand demographic change to improve management outcomes for controlling invasive alien species. We applied three emerging techniques for recreating past population dynamics—high resolution aerial photography time series, stem growth ring analysis and population level field surveys—to recreate the introduction and...
Article
Full-text available
Forests play a key role in regulating the global carbon cycle, and yet the abiotic and biotic conditions that drive the demographic processes which underpin forest carbon dynamics remain poorly understood in natural ecosystems. To address this knowledge gap, we used repeat forest inventory data from 92,285 trees across four large permanent plots (4...
Article
Full-text available
A common feature of most theories of invasion ecology is that the extent and intensity of invasions is driven by a combination of drivers, which can be grouped into three main factors: propagule pressure (P), abiotic drivers (A) and biotic interactions (B). However, teasing apart the relative contribution of P, A and B on Invasive Alien Species (IA...
Article
1.Forest ecosystem functioning generally benefits from higher tree species richness, but variation within richness levels is typically large. This is mostly due to the contrasting performances of communities with different compositions. Evidence‐based understanding of composition effects on forest productivity, as well as on multiple other function...
Article
Full-text available
Microclimate within forests influences ecosystem fluxes and demographic rates. Anthropogenic disturbances, such as selective logging can affect within-forest microclimate through effects on forest structure, leading to indirect effects on forests beyond the immediate impact of logging. However, the scope and predictability of these effects remains...
Article
Full-text available
Local‐scale microclimatic conditions in forest understoreys play a key role in shaping the composition, diversity and function of these ecosystems. Consequently, understanding what drives variation in forest microclimate is critical to forecasting ecosystem responses to global change, particularly in the tropics where many species already operate c...
Article
Full-text available
1.Conversion of forest to oil palm agriculture is a significant and ongoing threat to tropical biodiversity. Despite this, little is known about the value of riparian reserves in oil palm and how these conservation set‐asides might best be managed to maintain biodiversity. 2.We characterised bird communities of 28 sites in an oil palm‐forest mosaic...
Article
Full-text available
Borneo contains some of the world's most biodiverse and carbon-dense tropical forest, but this 750 000 km² island has lost 62 % of its old-growth forests within the last 40 years. Efforts to protect and restore the remaining forests of Borneo hinge on recognizing the ecosystem services they provide, including their ability to store and sequester ca...
Article
Full-text available
Topography is a key driver of tropical forest structure and composition, as it constrains local nutrient and hydraulic conditions within which trees grow. Yet we do not fully understand how changes in forest physiognomy driven by topography impact other emergent properties of forests, such as their aboveground carbon density (ACD). Working in Borne...
Article
Full-text available
In 2008, a group of conservation scientists compiled a list of 100 priority questions for the conservation of the world's biodiversity [Sutherland et al. (2009) Conservation Biology, 23, 557–567]. However, now almost a decade later, no one has yet published a study gauging how much progress has been made in addressing these 100 high‐priority questi...
Article
Full-text available
Forest carbon stocks in rapidly developing tropical regions are highly heterogeneous, which challenges efforts to develop spatially-explicit conservation actions. In addition to field-based biodiversity information, mapping of carbon stocks can greatly accelerate the identification, protection and recovery of forests deemed to be of high conservati...
Article
Full-text available
Background Understanding how trees respond to drought is critical to forecasting both short and long-term impacts of climate change on forests. The isotopic ratio of 13C to 12C stored in wood – referred to as δ13C – is widely used as an indicator of plant water status. Yet whether changes in δ13C linked to drought are also associated with declines...
Article
Full-text available
Humans require multiple services from ecosystems, but it is largely unknown whether trade-offs between ecosystem functions prevent the realisation of high ecosystem multifunctionality across spatial scales. Here, we combined a comprehensive dataset (28 ecosystem functions measured on 209 forest plots) with a forest inventory dataset (105,316 plots)...
Article
The importance of biodiversity in supporting ecosystem functioning is generally well accepted. However, most evidence comes from small-scale studies, and scaling-up patterns of biodiversity–ecosystem functioning (B-EF) remains challenging, in part because the importance of environmental factors in shaping B-EF relations is poorly understood. Using...
Article
Tropical forests are a key component of the global carbon cycle, and mapping their carbon density is essential for understanding human influences on climate and for ecosystem-service-based payments for forest protection. Discrete-return airborne laser scanning (ALS) is increasingly recognised as a high-quality technology for mapping tropical forest...
Article
Although terrestrial and marine ecosystems are often perceived as clearly distinct, in coastal areas biological communities on land and at sea are in fact intimately linked. One way in which terrestrial and marine systems interact is through the accumulation of seagrass wrack on beaches, which plays an important role as a nutrient input in coastal...
Article
Full-text available
Global biodiversity and productivity The relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem productivity has been explored in detail in herbaceous vegetation, but patterns in forests are far less well understood. Liang et al. have amassed a global forest data set from >770,000 sample plots in 44 countries. A positive and consistent relationship can be...
Article
Full-text available
Remote sensing is revolutionizing the way we study forests, and recent technological advances mean we are now able - for the first time - to identify and measure the crown dimensions of individual trees from airborne imagery. Yet to make full use of these data for quantifying forest carbon stocks and dynamics, a new generation of allometric tools w...
Conference Paper
In this paper we present a study on the estimation of the aboveground biomass in tropical forests at single tree level using airborne laser scanning (ALS) data. Individual tree crowns (ITCs) are firstly detected using a method based on an adaptive window that change its size according to tree height. The diameter at breast height (DBH) and the abov...
Article
Full-text available
Plant communities of coastal dunes are highly biodiverse and greatly valued for the services they provide, yet they are also threatened by global change and are often neglected in conservation planning. To determine the long-term effectiveness of conservation actions on Mediterranean coastal dunes, here we focus on Italy's coastline, and (i) assess...
Article
Full-text available
1. Tropical forests currently play a key role in regulating the terrestrial carbon cycle and abating climate change by storing carbon in wood. However, there remains considerable uncertainty as to whether tropical forests will continue to act as carbon sinks in the face of increased pressure from expanding human activities. Consequently, understand...
Article
Full-text available
There is considerable evidence that biodiversity promotes multiple ecosystem functions (multifunctionality), thus ensuring the delivery of ecosystem services important for human well-being. However, the mechanisms underlying this relationship are poorly understood, especially in natural ecosystems. We develop a novel approach to partition biodivers...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Numerous studies have demonstrated the importance of biodiversity in maintaining multiple ecosystem functions and services (multifunctionality) at local spatial scales, but it is unknown whether similar relationships are found at larger spatial scales in real-world landscapes. Here, we show, for the first time to our knowledge, that bi...
Article
Full-text available
1.It has been suggested that diverse forests utilize canopy space more efficiently than species-poor ones, as mixing species with complementary architectural and physiological traits allows trees to pack more densely. However, whether positive canopy packing – diversity relationships are a general feature of forests remains unclear.2.Using crown al...
Book
Full-text available
This volume is the outcome of a collaboration between the ISPRA Nature Protection Department and the Science Department of the Roma 3 University. The volume provides a synthesis of current knowledge on the Italian sand dune habitats and of the plant species typical of these environments, with the aim of providing a useful tool for the protection an...
Article
Full-text available
Both theory and evidence suggest that diversity stabilises productivity in herbaceous plant communities through a combination of overyielding, species asynchrony and favourable species interactions. However, whether these same processes also promote stability in forest ecosystems has never been tested. Using tree ring data from permanent forest plo...
Article
Mixed-species forests generally sequester and store more carbon in above-ground woody biomass compared to species-poor systems. However, the mechanisms driving the positive relationship between diversity and above-ground wood production (AWP) remain unclear.We investigate the role of competition for light and water as possible sources of complement...
Article
Established forests currently function as a major carbon sink, sequestering as woody biomass about 26% of global fossil fuel emissions. Whether forests continue to act as a global sink will depend on many factors, including the response of aboveground wood production (AWP; MgC ha-1 yr-1) to climate change. Here we explore how AWP in New Zealand's n...
Article
Although invasion has been linked to species losses in native plant communities, it is unclear how invasive species affect other important aspects of native community biodiversity, such as the composition of functional traits or the degree of phylogenetic relatedness. Here, we ask whether declines in taxonomic diversity (TD) associated with the spr...