Tomas Remenyi

Tomas Remenyi
University of Tasmania · Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS)

About

32
Publications
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2,297
Citations

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
Full-text available
Crop models were originally developed for application at the field scale but are increasingly used to assess the impact of climate and/or agronomic practices on crop growth and yield and water dynamics at larger scales. This raises the question of how data aggregation approaches affect outputs when using crop models at large spatial scales. This st...
Presentation
Full-text available
Input data aggregation influences crop model estimates at the regional level. Previous studies have focused on the impact of aggregating the climate data used to compute crop yields. Little is known about the combined data aggregation effect of climate (DAEc) and soil (DAEs) model inputs. This study explores the implications of using coarse resolut...
Article
Full-text available
Sudden losses to food production (that is, shocks) and their consequences across land and sea pose cumulative threats to global sustainability. We conducted an integrated assessment of global production data from crop, livestock, aquaculture and fisheries sectors over 53 years to understand how shocks occurring in one food sector can create diverse...
Article
Full-text available
Changes to the frequency of fire due to management decisions and climate change have the potential to affect the flammability of vegetation, with long-term effects on the vegetation structure and composition. Frequent fire in some vegetation types can lead to transformational change beyond which the vegetation type is radically altered. Such feedba...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change has the potential to significantly alter the characteristics of high-intensity, short-duration rainfall events, potentially leading to more severe and more frequent flash floods. Research has shown that future changes to such events could far exceed expectations based on temperature scaling and basic physical principles alone, but th...
Article
Full-text available
While seasonal outlooks have been operational for many years, until recently the extended-range timescale referred to as subseasonal-to-seasonal (S2S) has received little attention. S2S prediction fills the gap between short-range weather prediction and long-range seasonal outlooks. Decisions in a range of sectors are made in this extended-range le...
Article
Full-text available
A framework for identifying species that may become invasive under future climate conditions is presented, based on invader attributes and biogeography in combination with projections of future climate. We illustrate the framework using the CLIMEX niche model to identify future climate suitability for three species of Hawkweed that are currently pr...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report will help the Tasmanian community be better prepared for, respond to and recover from natural disasters through an updated understanding and awareness of the natural hazards that have the most potential to impact the State. The information contained in this report, including the risk register and risk treatment options together with th...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report will help the Tasmanian community be better prepared for, respond to and recover from natural disasters through an updated understanding and awareness of the natural hazards that have the most potential to impact the State. The information contained in this summary report, together with the risk register and risk treatment options prov...
Article
Fire is a complex process involving interactions and feedbacks between biological, socioeconomic, and physical drivers across multiple spatial and temporal scales. This complexity limits our ability to incorporate fire into Earth system models and project future fire activity under climate change. Conceptual, empirical, and process models have iden...
Article
Full-text available
The GEOTRACES Intermediate Data Product 2014 (IDP2014) is the first publicly available data product of the international GEOTRACES programme, and contains data measured and quality controlled before the end of 2013. It consists of two parts: (1) a compilation of digital data for more than 200 trace elements and isotopes (TEIs) as well as classical...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Fire danger has increased in recent decades, and is projected to increase further with global warming. We assessed the regional changes in fire danger that are projected to occur in Tasmania through to 2100 under a high emissions scenario. In contrast with previous continental–scale studies which show little change in Tasmanian fire danger, our res...
Article
Methylmercury has been determined in 93 sea water samples from the first thousand meters on 10 stations between Tasmania and Terre-Adelie in the Southern Ocean (SR3 Geotraces transect). Concentrations varied wildly from
Article
Trace metal micronutrients regulate primary production in oceanic surface waters, particularly those characterised as 'high nutrient, low chlorophyll', such as the Subantarctic Zone (SAZ). Our goal was to evaluate the distribution and biogeochemistry of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni and Zn in the upper 1000 m of this zone to the south of Australia during the SAZ-...
Article
Popular shipboard techniques to determine dissolved aluminium in open ocean seawater have two major disadvantages: relative to HPLC techniques, they require large sample volumes; and, in practice they are are only semi-automated. To address these two issues, the application of a reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) metho...
Article
A range of organic solvents (ethanol, isopropanol and acetone) has been investigated as alternatives to acetonitrile and methanol when used in conjunction with Corona Charged Aerosol Detection (Corona CAD). These solvents have been evaluated with regard to their effect on the response of the Corona CAD. Three dimensional response surfaces were cons...
Article
Full-text available
We have developed a method for the determination of copper in natural waters at nanomolar levels. The use of a microplate-reader minimizes sample processing time (~25 s per sample), reagent consumption (~120 μL per sample), and sample volume (~700 μL). Copper is detected by chemiluminescence. This technique is based on the formation of a complex be...
Article
A fast and sensitive reversed-phase high-performance liquid-chromatographic method for determination of aluminium in aqueous samples has been developed. The fluorescent aluminium-lumogallion complex (λex 505 nm, λem 574 nm), was formed with a pre-column reagent and then separated on a Chromolith® RP-18e Guard column using a two-tiered, stepped grad...
Article
This paper presents iron (Fe) profiles in the upper 1000 m from nine short-term (transect) stations and three long-term (process) stations occupied in the Australian sector of the Southern Ocean during the SAZ-Sense expedition in austral summer (January-February) 2007. Strong vertical and horizontal gradients in Fe concentrations were observed betw...
Article
Photosynthesis by marine phytoplankton requires bioavailable forms of several trace elements that are found in extremely low concentrations in the open ocean. We have compared the concentration, lability and size distribution (< 1 nm and < 10 nm) of a suite of trace elements that are thought to be limiting to primary productivity as well as a toxic...
Article
We present here the first mercury speciation study in the water column of the Southern Ocean, using a high-resolution south-to-north section (27 stations from 65.50°S to 44.00°S) with up to 15 depths (0–4440 m) between Antarctica and Tasmania (Australia) along the 140°E meridian. In addition, in order to explore the role of sea ice in Hg cycling, a...
Data
We present here the first mercury speciation study in the water column of the Southern Ocean, using a high-resolution south-to-north section (27 stations from 65.50°S to 44.00°S) with up to 15 depths (0-4440 m) between Antarctica and Tasmania (Australia) along the 140°E meridian. In addition, in order to explore the role of sea ice in Hg cycling, a...
Article
Trace elements often limit phytoplankton growth in the ocean, and the quantification of particulate forms is essential to fully understand their biogeochemical cycling. There is presently a lack of reliable measurements on the trace elemental content of marine particles, in part due to the inadequacies of the sampling and analytical methods employe...
Article
Full-text available
Iron limits phytoplankton growth and hence the biological carbon pump in the Southern Ocean. Models assessing the impacts of iron on the global carbon cycle generally rely on dust input and sediment resuspension as the predominant sources. Although it was previously thought that most iron from deep-ocean hydrothermal activity was inaccessible to ph...
Article
Full-text available
Author Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2009. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Global Biogeochemical Cycles 23 (2009): GB4034, doi:10.1029/2009GB003500. Climate change is projected to significantly alter the delivery (strat...
Article
Full-text available
The availability of iron limits primary productivity and the associated uptake of carbon over large areas of the ocean. Iron thus plays an important role in the carbon cycle, and changes in its supply to the surface ocean may have had a significant effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations over glacial-interglacial cycles. To date, the ro...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Estimating Crop Model Uncertainty in Agricultural Systems
Project
The Bureau of Meteorology has commenced an Australia-wide reanalysis project to generate the best-available representation of historical weather every hour over Australia and the surrounding region covering the period 1990 to 2015, using a state-of-the art numerical weather model, weather observations and terabytes of satellite data. The Australia-wide reanalysis dataset is being produced on a grid with a horizontal resolution of approximately 12 km, and encompasses 70 vertical levels through the depth of the atmosphere. Additional support has been made available by the emergency management sector in Tasmania, New South Wales and Western Australia, where higher-resolution subdomains are being implemented in parallel with the Australia-wide reanalysis project (see figure below). The Australia-wide reanalysis underpins these higher-resolution regional reanalysis by providing the required forcing input data. The Reanalysis for Tasmania dataset will produce a consistent reconstruction of the state of the atmosphere through time at an increased horizontal resolution of 1.5 km. It will provide a high-resolution meteorological and climatological dataset that will allow users to compare weather parameters such as wind, rainfall or temperature (or derived quantities such as fire danger) through time and space to inform emergency management and disaster risk activities in Tasmania. The vast amount of data currently being generated will permit studies leading to an unprecedented understanding of Tasmania's weather, particularly in areas that are currently poorly served by weather observations such as the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area (TWWHA) that suffered significant bushfires in January 2016. It will contribute to the many areas of concern that are influenced by the weather, including preparation for and response to weather-related natural hazards, primary production and ecological studies. The Reanalysis for Tasmania project is managed by the Dr Chris White from the Climate Futures program at ACE CRC in partnership with Dr Paul Fox-Hughes from the Bureau of Meteorology, with support from the Tasmanian Partnership for Advanced Computing (TPAC) and the University of Tasmania. It is supported by the Tasmanian Bushfire Mitigation Grants Programme, which is jointly funded by the Commonwealth and State Governments under the National Partnership Agreement on Natural Disaster Resilience. The three year Reanalysis for Tasmania project is set to run up to late 2018.