Tom van Nuenen

Tom van Nuenen
King's College London | KCL · Department of Informatics

Doctor of Philosophy

About

29
Publications
9,604
Reads
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187
Citations
Introduction
I'm a Research Associate in Digital Discrimination at the Department of Informatics of King’s College, investigating public perceptions of algorithmic bias. I also hold a special interest in the intersection of tourism and digital technology. Articles have been published in IEEE Computer, Tourist Studies, The Journal of Popular Culture, and Games and Culture, amongst others.
Additional affiliations
September 2018 - present
King's College London
Position
  • Fellow
Description
  • Tom teaches on algorithmic culture and digital methods. He is especially interested in approaches combining corpus linguistics with hermeneutics.
January 2017 - August 2018
Tilburg University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Description
  • As an Assistant Professor in Online Culture, I taught on digital methods and literacies, popular culture, and hermeneutics.

Publications

Publications (29)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper reports on empirical work conducted to study perceptions of unfair treatment caused by automated computational systems. While the pervasiveness of algorithmic bias has been widely acknowledged, and perceptions of fairness are commonly studied in Human Computer Interaction, there is a lack of research on how unfair treatment by automated...
Article
Full-text available
Language carries implicit human biases, functioning both as a reflection and a perpetuation of stereotypes that people carry with them. Recently, ML-based NLP methods such as word embeddings have been shown to learn such language biases with striking accuracy. This capability of word embeddings has been successfully exploited as a tool to quantify...
Article
Full-text available
When it comes to understanding experiences of illness, humanities and social sciences research have traditionally reserved a prominent role for narrative. Yet, depression has characteristics that withstand the form of traditional narratives, such as a lack of desire and an impotence to act. How can a ‘datafied’ approach to online forms of depressio...
Article
Full-text available
Operating at a large scale and impacting large groups of people, automated systems can make consequential and sometimes contestable decisions. Automated decisions can impact a range of phenomena, from credit scores to insurance payouts to health evaluations. These forms of automation can become problematic when they place certain groups or people a...
Article
Full-text available
This article discusses the concomitant processes of increasing familiarisation, responsiveness and responsibility that digital technology enables in the realm of tourism. We reflect on the influence of the proliferation of interactive digital platforms and solutions within tourism practice and behaviour through a range of lenses, from user generate...
Preprint
Full-text available
Centered on the controversial idea that police forces are often a focal point for conflict in today's societies, this chapter takes an interest in big data policing in Amsterdam as a contested development. Looking at the socio-technical preconditions of such new, algorithmic forms of policing brings to the surface that police forces employ certain...
Article
Artificial intelligence decision making can cause discriminatory harm to many vulnerable groups. Redress is often suggested through increased transparency of these systems. But for what group are we implementing it? This article seeks to identify what transparency means for technical, legislative, and public realities and stakeholders.
Preprint
Full-text available
Language carries implicit human biases, functioning both as a reflection and a perpetuation of stereotypes that people carry with them. Recently, ML-based NLP methods such as word embeddings have been shown to learn such language biases with striking accuracy. This capability of word embeddings has been successfully exploited as a tool to quantify...
Article
In this article, we advocate for a new kind of renaissance person, a humanistic data scientist capable of profound cultural analysis and critique. A person able to critique from deep within the technical infrastructure and someone who understands an age-old wisdom within the humanities-that knowledge is always a pursuit and never a completed journe...
Preprint
Full-text available
With the widespread and pervasive use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) for automated decision-making systems, AI bias is becoming more apparent and problematic. One of its negative consequences is discrimination: the unfair, or unequal treatment of individuals based on certain characteristics. However, the relationship between bias and discriminatio...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We present a data-driven approach using word embeddings to discover and categorise language biases on the discussion platform Reddit. As spaces for isolated user communities, platforms such as Reddit are increasingly connected to issues of racism, sexism and other forms of discrimination. Hence, there is a need to monitor the language of these grou...
Preprint
Full-text available
We present a data-driven approach using word embeddings to discover and categorise language biases on the discussion platform Reddit. As spaces for isolated user communities, platforms such as Reddit are increasingly connected to issues of racism, sexism and other forms of discrimination. Hence, there is a need to monitor the language of these grou...
Article
Full-text available
AI decision-making can cause discriminatory harm to many vulnerable groups. Redress is often suggested through increased transparency of these systems. But who are we implementing it for? This article seeks to identify what transparency means for technical, legislative and public realities and stakeholders.
Article
Full-text available
In an online sphere characterized by terms such as post-truth, clickbait and filter bubbles, quantitative data analysis needs to be grounded more than ever in solid interpretative frameworks. Based on experiences in university education in different geographical contexts, this paper explores the opportunities and challenges in teaching hermeneutic...
Article
Full-text available
This article discusses the touristic production of authenticity in the context of algorithmic culture. It notes that the dominant sociological framework of authenticity has, in the last decades, shifted from an objectivist to a constructionist one, a central issue becoming “who has the right to authenticate.” I argue here that “who” needs to be sup...
Chapter
Full-text available
The Cambridge History of Travel Writing - edited by Nandini Das January 2019
Chapter
Full-text available
The practice of designing Interactive Digital Narratives [IDN] is often described as a challenge facing issues such as the “narrative paradox” and avoid-ing the unintentional creation of “ludonarrative dissonance”. These terms are expressions of a perspective that takes narrative and interactivity as dichotomic ends of a design trajectory, mirrorin...
Chapter
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
The Assassin’s Creed videogame series, developed by Ubisoft, is known for its representation of historical places and eras, such as Jerusalem during the Crusades and Paris during the French Revolution. The current article takes an interest in the games’ chronotopic appropriation of touristic attitudes: the ways in which the gameplay and game world...
Article
Full-text available
A recurrent subject in modern travel discourses is formed by anti-tourism: a desire of travellers to reach beyond the allegedly superficial experiences that the tourism industry fosters. This paper explores the anti-touristic attitude in the context of online peer-to-peer platforms: collaborative services enabling barter in labour, skills, knowledg...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores the procedural means through which videogames can simulate travel experiences. It focuses on Journey, a highly acclaimed game in which the player embarks on an archetypical trek to a mountain in the distance, thus offering a virtual take on the complex play of sensorial and locomotive aspects of pilgrimage. Through a close rea...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the discursive structure of several popular travel blogs to understand the relationship between authenticity and self-branding. Instances of present-day “canonical” blogs are examined, showing up high on Google searches, attracting significant audiences, and featuring on “best of” lists presented by other websites. Through a d...
Article
Full-text available
This article investigates discursive procedures in From Software’s 2011 videogame Dark Souls. By combining procedural rhetorics, discourse analysis, and autoethnographical research play, it is argued that Dark Souls features post-Panoptical gameplay mechanics of both continuous surveillance and playful exhibitionism and a hybrid gameplay experience...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Archived project
Every day, billions of people use the internet to search for products, check their email, share information with friends and use social networks. Individuals leave a trail of identifying information that companies use to gather insights into current and potential customers. Since the beginnings of the commercial internet, third party cookies have been integral to how we are targeted and marketed to online. Businesses have used them in their digital marketing to track consumers even when they are not visiting their website. Challenged by data protection regulators and increasingly blocked by the major online platform companies, the role of third party cookies in AdTech is now set to decline. The personalisation of marketing will undoubtedly become ever more sophisticated, but how AdTech will operate in the future, either technically or commercially, is an open question. Perry Keller has recently secured funding from the Information Commissioners Office (ICO) for ‘After third party cookies – Consumer consent and data autonomy in the globalised AdTech industry’. The project will critically investigate changes in the world’s dominant AdTech markets, the United States and the People’s Republic of China (PRC), to shed light on the future of programmatic advertising in the UK. The project will assess alternative ways to give consumers personal data control and empower them as AdTech profiling and tracking evolves.evolves.
Project
Project on how activist groups such as Black Lives Matter use digital media to protest against such police profiling and the assumptions about race and class that underpin it. More specifically, the project sheds light on how metadata such as hashtags give people the archival power that traditionally belonged to the criminal justice system.