Todd D. Johnson

Todd D. Johnson
University of New Hampshire | UNH · Department of Natural Resources & the Environment

PhD Entomology

About

16
Publications
2,885
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140
Citations
Introduction
I seek to understand how natural enemies shape the ecology, evolution, and behavior of their prey and/or hosts. Particularly, I am interested in how these selective forces influence the diversity and evolution of signals and cues that insects produce, as well as respond to when making decisions. The results from my research will provide a better understanding of the ecology of interactions between insects and their natural enemies, informing management of insects in forest ecosystems.
Additional affiliations
August 2013 - present
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Position
  • PhD Student
August 2010 - September 2013
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Emerald ash borer biological control in Wisconsin forests, behavior of EAB parasitoids, and arthropods associated with native species of Agrilus.
Education
August 2013 - May 2019
August 2011 - September 2013
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Field of study
  • Entomology
August 2005 - May 2009
Moravian College
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (16)
Conference Paper
We examined parasitoids and other co-occurring insects associated with three native Agrilus species, twolined chesnut borer (Agrilus bilineatus), bronze birch borer (Agrilus anxius), and bronze poplar borer (Agrilus liragus), in Wisconsin. Wisconsin is on the western leading edge of the invasive Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis, and has at le...
Article
Full-text available
A recent invader to North America, emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Buprestidae), is expanding its western range into new habitats. We examined how site factors affect the emergence and damage caused by this beetle on the western edge of its contiguous population in eastern Wisconsin, U.S.A. We characterized forest structure and qua...
Article
Full-text available
Longhorned beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) include many species that are among the most damaging pests of managed and natural forest ecosystems worldwide. Many species of cerambycids use volatile chemical signals (i.e., pheromones) to locate mates. Pheromones are often used by natural enemies, including parasitoids, to locate hosts and therefore...
Article
Many species of beetles in the family Cerambycidae use volatile pheromones to facilitate the location of mates. Visual cues may also influence the location of mates, as the adults of many species of cerambycids are often brightly patterned and diurnal. Theory predicts that combining signals or cues of different modalities (e.g., chemical, visual) t...
Article
We present research on the chemical ecology of 14 species of longhorned beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), in four tribes of the subfamily Cerambycinae, conducted in east-central Illinois over 8 yr. Adult males produce aggregation-sex pheromones that attract both sexes. Twenty independent field bioassays explored the pheromone chemistry of the spe...
Article
Full-text available
An increasing body of evidence suggests that the volatile pheromones of cerambycid beetles are much more diverse in structure than previously hypothesized. Here, we describe the identification, synthesis, and field testing of (2E,6Z,9Z)-2,6,9-pentadecatrienal as a male-produced aggregation-sex pheromone of the cerambycid Elaphidion mucronatum (Say)...
Presentation
Full-text available
This abstract describes a presentation given on the development of automated camera systems to quantify the behavior of arthropods in field-conditions.
Article
Full-text available
The compound 1-(1H–pyrrol-2-yl)-1,2-propanedione (“pyrrole”) is an important pheromone component of several Asian and South American species of longhorned beetles in the subfamily Cerambycinae. Here, we report the first confirmed identification of this compound as a pheromone component of a cerambycine species native to North America, the rare beet...
Presentation
Full-text available
Evaluating the responses of natural enemies to pheromones and eggs of a cerambycid beetle in a field setting.
Conference Paper
To locate resources and mates, insects often use a combination of chemical and visual cues to orient to a particular habitat or individual. Beetles in the family Cerambycidae usually respond strongly to long-range pheromones emitted by potential mates. Visual cues may influence responses by these beetles to their pheromones. The objectives of our s...
Presentation
Full-text available
Beetles in the family Cerambycidae often emit long-range pheromones to facilitate in the location of mates. Many species of parasitoids have been shown to use pheromones of Coleoptera as kairomones to locate hosts. Our objective was to identify species of parasitoids that are attracted by pheromones of cerambycids in the subfamily Cerambycinae. We...
Article
Full-text available
The Muller F element (4.2 Mb, ~80 protein-coding genes) is an unusual autosome of Drosophila melanogaster; it is mostly heterochromatic with a low recombination rate. To investigate how these properties impact the evolution of repeats and genes, we manually improved the sequence and annotated the genes on the D. erecta, D. mojavensis, and D. grimsh...
Presentation
Beetles in the family Cerambycidae often emit long-range, sex pheromones to facilitate mate-location. Several species of parasitoids have been shown to ’eavesdrop’ on olfactory cues emitted by potential hosts. Orienting towards the sex pheromones of potential hosts may be a reliable and efficient way to locate an opportunity to oviposit. Our object...
Conference Paper
Two parasitoids, the introduced specialist Spathius agrili Yang (Braconidae), and the native generalist Spathius floridanus Ashmead (Braconidae), have been proposed as biological control agents of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire). However, little is known about their host-location behaviors. We evaluated wasp responses to thre...

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