Todd Anderson

Todd Anderson
University of Washington Seattle | UW · Department of Earth and Space Sciences

Bachelor of Arts

About

8
Publications
823
Reads
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20
Citations
Introduction
I am interested in ionosphere inputs from both the top-side (e.g. solar events) and bottom-side (lightning, thermospheric upwelling), especially where this pertains to radio wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide, and to the global electric circuit (GEC). I use the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) to map global lightning and VLF radio propagation, and am currently also working on a high-altitude balloon campaign to measure the fair-weather return current of the GEC.
Additional affiliations
March 2016 - present
University of Washington Seattle
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • TA for ESS 205: Access to Space, offered spring quarters. Students design and build experimental payloads that are flown on a sounding balloon out of Moses Lake, WA.
August 2015 - present
University of Washington Seattle
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
September 2015 - July 2020
University of Washington Seattle
Field of study
  • Earth and Space Sciences

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
Full-text available
World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) data on global lightning are used to investigate the increase of total lightning strokes at Arctic latitudes. We use the summertime data from June, July, and August (JJA) which average >200,000 strokes each year above 65°N for the years 2010–2020. We minimize the possible influence of WWLLN network dete...
Article
Full-text available
Solar flares, energetic particles, and Earth‐impacting coronal mass ejections enhance ionization in the lower ionosphere, inhibiting radio wave propagation in the Earth‐ionosphere waveguide (EIWG). This enhanced ionization is observed locally by ionosondes and GPS/GNSS receivers, but spatial coverage of these observations is limited by receiver loc...
Preprint
Full-text available
Solar flares, energetic particles and Earth-impacting coronal mass ejections enhance ionization in the lower ionosphere, inhibiting radio wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide (EIWG). This enhanced ionization is observed locally by ionosondes and GPS/GNSS receivers, but spatial coverage of these observations is limited by receiver loca...
Poster
Full-text available
The global electrical circuit, which maintains a potential of about 280 kV between the earth and the ionosphere, is thought to be driven mainly by electrified clouds. After multiday averaging, the fair-weather electric field has a distinct shape, known as the Carnegie curve. The curve has three maxima that have been shown to correlate with the aver...
Preprint
Full-text available
Solar flares, energetic particles and Earth-impacting coronal mass ejections enhance ionization in the lower ionosphere, inhibiting radio wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide (EIWG). This enhanced ionization is observed locally by ionosondes and GPS/GNSS receivers, but spatial coverage of these observations is limited by receiver loca...
Poster
Full-text available
Solar events and Sun-magnetosphere interactions can cause significant impacts on Earth's ionosphere. Solar flares and Earth-impacting coronal mass ejections enhance ionization in the lower ionosphere, inhibiting radio wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide (EIWG). This enhanced ionization is observed in specific locations by ionosondes,...
Poster
Full-text available
Solar flares have been known to cause changes in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. Previous studies of solar flares have shown that X-rays can ionize lower-altitude layers of the ionosphere, leading to enhanced VLF attenuation (e.g. Thomson and Clilverd, 2001), and particle events associated with flares can cause absorption of radio waves over the po...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Quantify the role of thunderstorm activity as a driver of Earth's global electric circuit. The required measurements of the fair weather vertical electric field and current density would be obtained over a period of several days. The time series of the fair weather electric field and vertical current density at high altitude, above weather, orographic, and other influences, obtained by using the well-proven technique of double Langmuir probes on a stratospheric balloon platform would be compared to properties of the contemporaneous global thunderstorm activity.
Project
Using global real-time lightning data from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), we plan to build a near-real-time global VLF propagation/attenuation monitor by considering changes in detected stroke-station paths in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide.
Project
Investigate the thunderstorm contribution to the fair-weather return current of the Global Electric Circuit (GEC). We will launch 2-4 high-altitude balloons over the Pacific Ocean with electric field and conductivity instruments, and correlate this data with thunderstorm area as determined by data from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) and the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) onboard the GOES-16 satellite. Science flights are scheduled for summer 2019, and a single test flight will take place in summer 2018. Hopefully we come up with a more interesting project name before the science flights!