Toby Prike

Toby Prike
University of Western Australia | UWA · School of Psychological Science

PhD

About

16
Publications
866
Reads
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46
Citations

Publications

Publications (16)
Preprint
Given the negative impact reliance on misinformation can have on individuals and society, substantial effort has gone into understanding the factors that influence misinformation belief and propagation. However, despite the rise of social media often being cited as a fundamental driver of misinformation exposure and false beliefs, how people proces...
Preprint
Misinformation can have noxious impacts on cognition, fostering formation of false beliefs, retroactively distorting memory for events, and influencing reasoning and decision making even after it has been credibly corrected. Researchers investigating the impacts of real-world misinformation are therefore faced with an ethical issue: they must consi...
Chapter
Full-text available
Recent years have seen large changes to research practices within psychology and a variety of other empirical fields in response to the discovery (or rediscovery) of the pervasiveness and potential impact of questionable research practices, coupled with well-publicised failures to replicate published findings. In response to this, and as part of a...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter, we summarise the scientific and policy implications of the Bayesian model-based approach, starting from an evaluation of its possible advantages, limitations, and potential to influence further scientific developments, policy and practice. We focus here specifically on the role of limits of knowledge and reducible (epistemic), as w...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter outlines the role that individual-level empirical evidence gathered from psychological experiments and surveys can play in informing agent-based models, and the model-based approach more broadly. To begin with, we provide an overview of the way that this empirical evidence can be used to inform agent-based models. Additionally, we prov...
Article
Full-text available
In a pre-registered experiment, we presented participants with information about the safety of traveling during a deadly pandemic and during a migration trip using five different sources (a news article, a family member, an official organization, someone with personal experience, and the travel organizer) and four different verbal descriptions of t...
Book
This open access book presents a ground-breaking approach to developing micro-foundations for demography and migration studies. It offers a unique and novel methodology for creating empirically grounded agent-based models of international migration – one of the most uncertain population processes and a top-priority policy area. The book discusses i...
Article
Full-text available
Migration decisions are taken in the context of personal needs and desires while facing uncertainty regarding outcomes of alternative behavioral options. Information about the future and its opportunities is incomplete, and whether migration turns out as a personal success or failure depends mostly on circumstances that are ex ante unknown and ex p...
Article
A poor understanding of probability may lead people to misinterpret every day coincidences and form anomalistic (e.g., paranormal) beliefs. We investigated the relationship between anomalistic belief (including type of belief) and misperception of chance and the base rate fallacy across both anomalistic and control (i.e., neutral) contexts. Greater...
Poster
Motivated rejection of science refers to the tendency of people with higher reasoning ability to correctly interpret evidence for neutral topics but inaccurately interpret evidence that disagrees with a core belief. The seminal paradigm tested participants on a single trial in one of three contexts; neutral, congruent with political beliefs, or inc...
Article
Biases in the assessment and integration of evidence are likely contributors to anomalistic (e.g., paranormal, extra-terrestrial) beliefs because of the non-evidence based nature of these beliefs. However, little research has examined the relationship between anomalistic beliefs and evidence integration biases. The current study addressed this gap...
Article
A growing body of research has shown people who hold anomalistic (e.g., paranormal) beliefs may differ from nonbelievers in their propensity to make probabilistic reasoning errors. The current study explored the relationship between these beliefs and performance through the development of a new measure of anomalistic belief, called the Anomalistic...
Article
Previous studies have shown that punishing people through a large penalty for volunteering incorrect information typically leads them to withhold more information (metacognitive response bias), but it does not appear to influence their ability to distinguish between their own correct and incorrect answers (metacognitive accuracy discrimination). Th...
Article
A growing body of research has shown that context manipulations can have little or no impact on accuracy performance, yet still significantly influence metacognitive performance. For example, participants in a test-list context paradigm study one list of words with a medium levels-of-processing task and a second word list with either a shallow or d...

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