Tobias Nyumba

Tobias Nyumba
The University of York · Environment and Geography

Doctor of Philosophy

About

35
Publications
109,959
Reads
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1,390
Citations
Introduction
My current research interests revolve around the impacts of mega-infrastructure on biodiversity and areas of conservation importance. Transportation infrastructure plays a major role in moving goods and services that support the economic and social growth within and between countries. Over the past decades, an increasing amount of transportation infrastructure has been constructed in sub-Saharan Africa, accounting for up to 90% of new infrastructure with much more proposed. Examples include Kenya's LAPSSET and SGR corridors. Attention to their social and ecological impacts are increasingly being documented. Yet, there still a lot that is unknown and requiring research and documentation.
Additional affiliations
December 2019 - present
Dakota Wesleyan University
Position
  • Managing Director
October 2018 - present
University of Nairobi
Position
  • Lecturer
October 2018 - present
African Conservation Centre
African Conservation Centre
Position
  • Project Manager
Education
October 2013 - May 2018
University of Cambridge
Field of study
  • Geography
October 2007 - September 2008
University of Cambridge
Field of study
  • Environment, Society and Development
August 1999 - December 2004
Egerton University
Field of study
  • Environmental Science

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
Full-text available
Land cover has been modified by anthropogenic activities for thousands of years, although the speed of change has increased in recent decades, particularly driven by socio-economic development. The development of transport infrastructure can accelerate land use land cover change, resulting in impacts on natural resources such as water, biodiversity...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we advance a novel approach to integrated assessment of the ways in which the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are likely to manifest and interact within a given development context, using Q-Methodology and the conceptual framing of imaginaries. We apply this to development corridors and identify three qualitatively distinct imagi...
Article
Full-text available
Improving human capital through quality education remains a global and national priority, particularly for developing countries. Academic performance is the standard indicator of a successful acquisition of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes for improving human capital. However, recent data, particularly in wildlife areas shows that pupils often...
Article
Full-text available
As we build roads, let's spare a thought for affected ecosystems | Nation https://nation.africa/kenya/blogs-opinion/blogs/as-we-build-roads-lets spare a thought for affected ecosystems -3502338
Article
Full-text available
Gaining insights into local people’s views, values and preferences for different conservation management options are increasingly gaining importance among conservationists and decision-makers. This can be achieved through the assessment and understanding of conservation attitudes and perceptions of rural communities including demographic characteri...
Article
Full-text available
Transportation infrastructure, such as railways, roads and power lines, contribute to national and regional economic, social and cultural growth and integration. Kenya, with support from the Chinese government, is currently constructing a standard gauge railway (SGR) to support the country’s Vision 2030 development agenda. Although the actual land...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This research provides a critical analysis of development corridors as a mechanism for delivering on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Using Q-Methodology, we identify three qualitatively distinct imaginaries of development corridors that exist among development actors, across five development corridors in East Africa. These imaginaries art...
Article
Full-text available
Human-elephant conflict is an often intractable problem that threatens the contribution of conservation interventions to human wellbeing and securing livelihoods in Africa and Asia. Local human populations living in key elephant ranges are among the world's most poor and vulnerable people. In efforts to address this problem, previous studies have m...
Presentation
Full-text available
GIGO (Garbage In Garbage Out) is a nightmare for researchers aiming for peer-reviewed work. It is even a death knell for policymakers and practitioners whose decisions and actions have real-life implications. Avoiding GIGO begins with well-designed and validated data collection tools. For household surveys, being organised and appreciative of the n...
Presentation
Full-text available
Basic understanding of household surveys in research.
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report presents the results of the study ‘‘Development Corridors in Kenya: Scoping Study”. The objective was to review the current baseline situation in relation to mega-scale development corridor projects in Kenya vis à vis the people and society, environment, conservation and development. The work forms the basis for the planning and impleme...
Article
Full-text available
1. Decision‐making is a complex process that typically includes a series of stages: identifying the issue, considering possible options, making judgements and then making a decision by combining information and values. The current status quo relies heavily on the informational aspect of decision‐making with little or no emphasis on the value positi...
Thesis
Full-text available
This thesis examines the impacts of human-elephant conflict on human wellbeing and the implications for elephant conservation and management in Trans Mara District, Kenya. The District comprises communal lands bordering the world-famous Masai Mara National Reserve in southwestern Kenya. Trans Mara supports a range of land use types and provides ref...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation policy decisions can suffer from a lack of evidence, hindering effective decision‐making. In nature conservation, studies investigating why policy is often not evidence‐informed have tended to focus on Western democracies, with relatively small samples. To understand global variation and challenges better, we established a global surve...
Article
Full-text available
1. Focus group discussion is frequently used as a qualitative approach to gain an in-depth understanding of social issues. The method aims to obtain data from a purposely selected group of individuals rather than from a statistically representative sample of a broader population. Even though the application of this method in conservation research h...
Article
Full-text available
1. Decision-making is a complex process that typically includes a series of stages: identifying the issue, considering possible options, making judgements and then making a decision by combining information and values. The current status quo relies heavily on the informational aspect of decision-making with little or no emphasis on the value positi...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation policy decisions can suffer from a lack of evidence, hindering effective decision-making. In nature conservation, studies investigating why policy is often not evidence-informed have tended to focus on Western democracies, with relatively small samples. To understand global variation and challenges better, we established a global surve...
Data
FIGURE S1 Flow diagram illustrating the survey methodology FIGURE S2 Ranking of barriers by role according to Human Development Index FIGURE S3 Proportion of different roles (Red: Policy position, Yellow: practitioners, Blue: Policy position) experiencing the barriers FIGURE S4 Proportion of male and female respondents to the online survey by ro...
Article
Full-text available
Human-elephant conflict, in particular the damage that elephants cause to smallholder crops, undermines rural livelihoods and represents a major challenge to the conservation of elephants in Africa. Traditional methods for addressing this problem such as lighting fires, beating tins and throwing stones are often ineffective. So too are some of the...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports experience under Darwin Initiative project 15/040 on the use of community drama to spread awareness of techniques to mitigate human-elephant conflict in Laikipia in north-central Kenya. Drama can be an effective way of generating public understanding of conservation problems. It can overcome the barrier of literacy, and create op...
Article
Full-text available
Recorded incidence of conflict between humans and elephants, in particular crop-raiding, is increasing in rural Africa and Asia, undermining efforts to conserve biological diversity. Gaining an understanding of the underlying determinants of human–elephant conflict is important for the development of appropriate management tools. This study analyse...
Thesis
Full-text available
In many parts of Africa, large herbivores find their way into private lands, competing for forage with livestock and destroying crops. In Kenya, elephants (Loxodonta africana) pose a real threat to subsistence farmers at the interface between the elephants’ range and agricultural land. Conservation and land use strategies and policies in Kenya do n...
Article
Full-text available
Human-elephant conflict, in particular the damage caused by elephants to smallholder crops, is a major challenge to the conservation of African elephant Loxodonta africana. Conventional tools used to address this problem are capital intensive and require high levels of expertise. In recent years simple, affordable farm-based elephant deterrents, us...

Questions

Questions (8)
Question
I have read a very interesting paper by one author I admire and have cited a lot in my work. However, one of the papers provides a review of the state of things over a 20 year period having been published un 2015. Five or so years later, the challenge discussed still persists and the interventions identified then are still the same ones being applied by practitioners to date.
My interest is then to review these practices between 2016 and 2021 to give an update of how things are now.
My question then is: How best can I tittle this new paper to make it catchy but also without losing the fact that it is an update to the published article by different author?
Question
I would like to carry out a GLMM in SPSS. However, I am struggling to follow through the steps and the interpretation of the results. Can someone, kindly point me to some resources with a step-wise guide? or agree to have an online chat to take me through the procedure?
Thanks in advance.
Question
I am starting a literature review for a paper we are planning to publish. I have checked the different databases: Scopus Search, Google Scholar Search, Web of Science Search, and Microsoft Academic Search.
I seem to have quick and easy access to the MAS and have maned to download a good number of papers for this work. However, it is the first time I am using it and am wondering what might be your thoughts on the suitability of Microsoft Academic Search as a database of choice for literature search and review?
Any references will also be appreciated.
Thanks
Question
I am planning on carrying out a large study to assess and map habitat quality along a development corridor. I am planning to use the InVest tool, but I have not been very successful in understanding the tool through the user guide only. Can anyone help out with some training or recommend some who can offer the training based in Nairobi, Kenya?
Question
I have conducted a PSM using SPSS and generated new matched data with propensity scores. My original data set was based on a HH questionnaire with 367 respondents. I wanted to generate a control group out of this data. I had a "treatment" administered on 217 and the rest 150 did not have this treatment. I ran a rather successful PSM and got some good results or so I think.
1. Logit estimate returned a Pseudo- R2 of .147 and Log Likelihood of 484.016; Chi Square of 14.454 and Prob>Chi2 <.0001; I had seven variables and six of which significantly predicted the probability of being treated.
2. The mean of propensity scores were:
Treated: n= 217 Mean: .63743 Min: .13063 Max: .89690
Control: n=76 Mean: .57739 Min: .26269 Max: .82095
3. I determined a common support region as: .13063 - .82095. This restriction had serous consequence on my data. My final matched data for analysis came down drastically to just 152. (76 Treated vs 76 Control). Here is my question:
Is this a normal occurrence in PSM analysis? is it normal to have such a huge drop in the data points? What might be the problem or otherwise in the subsequent analysis (ATT analysis)?
Question
I am beginning a research project looking at the impacts of transportation corridors on biodiversity. My first task is to map out the habitat quality along a linear transport infrastructure running through some protected areas, community conservancies, forests and open areas of human settlement, and covering close to 800km in length.
I would like to use the InVEST Habitat Quality assessment method. I am keen to hear some thoughts on the following and any other key considerations I might have left out
  1. Study design to ensure all the necessary steps are followed.
  2. Data types required to effectively develop the model. In my case, I have proposed Land Use Land Cover types (Forests, agriculture, Built-up areas, others-water bodies barren/open lands); and Anthropocentric threats to biodiversity such as agriculture, settlement, roads and railways.
Question
I am trying to assess various factors affecting the wellbeing of communities living around a protected area in Africa. I developed a set of eight wellbeing indicators for this assessment. I conducted a household survey and my sample comprised of more males (n=309, 84%) and fewer females (n=58, 16%).
In my analysis, I have included a number of factors including gender and age of respondent, employment, education, household size, receiving benefits from conservation and experiencing conflict with wildlife. My results indicate that education, employment and age of respondents influenced different wellbeing indicators. However, gender did not appear to influence any of the wellbeing indicators.
Could it be possible that my unequal numbers of male and female respondents affected the gender variable? Any literature to support or dispute this thinking?
Thanks
Question
I am interested in conducting an analysis of sentiments of Facebook users drawn from a Facebook Group. My aim is to mine their opinions and perceptions/views of conservation issues based on their comments or responses to key issues in the group discussion forum. The group has a membership of 50,000 drawn from different academic, social, regional, professional backgrounds and career levels and is extremely active online with very interesting opinions or views on conservation. 
I need to retrieve the posts/responses for five years between 2012 and 2017!!!! Might be a lot of data, but the bottom line is how do I retrieve this data/posts? Any ideas on how I can design the study to make it more efficient? Any key literature you may point me to? 
I will appreciate your suggestions.

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Assess the changing nature of the impacts of linear transportation infrastructure, directly and indirectly on elephants, their habitat, use of the land by local communities to inform future human-elephant coexistence, and the development of more harmonised sustainable transport infrastructure.