Tobias Mattsson

Tobias Mattsson
Stockholm University | SU · Department of Geological Sciences

PhD

About

16
Publications
4,371
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64
Citations
Introduction
Tobias Mattsson currently works at the Department of Geological Sciences, Stockholm University. I am studying strain localisation in granite plutons by field mapping and characterization of magma flow indicators, such as flow bands and crystal alignment.
Additional affiliations
September 2020 - present
University of St Andrews
Position
  • PostDoc Position
April 2020 - present
Stockholm University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2019 - March 2020
Uppsala University
Position
  • Reseacher
Education
December 2014 - December 2018
Uppsala University
Field of study
  • Volcano Tectonics

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Full-text available
Felsic magma commonly pools within shallow mushroom-shaped magmatic intrusions, so-called laccoliths or cryptodomes, which can cause both explosive eruptions and collapse of the volcanic edifice. Deformation during laccolith emplacement is primarily considered to occur in the host rock. However, shallowly emplaced laccoliths (cryptodomes) show exte...
Article
Full-text available
Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and anisotropy of magnetic remanence (AARM and AIRM) are efficient and versatile techniques to indirectly determine rock fabrics. Yet, deciphering the source of a magnetic fabric remains a crucial and challenging step, notably in the presence of ferrimagnetic phases. Here we use X-ray micro-computed tomog...
Article
Full-text available
Cryptodome and dome collapse is associated with volcanic hazards, such as, explosive eruptions, pyroclastic density currents, and volcanic edifice collapse. The study of the growth and evolution of volcanic domes provides vital information on the link between dome growth and the development of weakness zones that may cause collapse. The Cerro Bayo...
Article
Full-text available
The Mourne Mountains magmatic center in Northern Ireland consists of five successively intruded granites emplaced in the upper crust. The Mourne granite pluton has classically been viewed as a type locality of a magma body emplaced by cauldron subsidence. Cauldron subsidence makes space for magma through the emplacement of ring dikes and floor subs...
Article
Full-text available
The Palaeogene layered ultrabasic intrusion of the Isle of Rum forms the hearth of the Rum Igneous Centre in NW-Scotland. The regional Long Loch Fault, which is widely held to represent the feeder system to the layered magma reservoir, dissects the intrusion and is marked by extensive ultrabasic breccias of various types. Here we explore the connec...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding magma transport in sheet intrusions is crucial to interpreting volcanic unrest. Studies of dyke emplacement and geometry focus predominantly on low-viscosity, mafic dykes. Here, we present an in-depth study of two high-viscosity dykes (106 Pa·s) in the Chachahuén volcano, Argentina, the Great Dyke and the Sosa Dyke. To quantify dyke g...
Article
Full-text available
The Loch Bà ring-dyke and the associated Centre 3 granites represent the main events of the final phase of activity at the Palaeogene Mull igneous complex. The Loch Bà ring-dyke is one of the best exposed ring-intrusions in the world and records intense interaction between rhyolitic and basaltic magma. To reconstruct the evolutionary history of the...
Article
Full-text available
Large-volume pyroclastic eruptions are not known from the basalt-dominated British Palaeogene Igneous Province (BPIP), although silicic magmatism is documented from intra-caldera successions in central volcanoes and from small-volume ash-layers in the associated lava fields. Exceptions are the Sgùrr of Eigg (58.7 Ma) and Òigh-sgeir pitchstones in t...
Article
Full-text available
The 2014-15 Holuhraun eruption on Iceland was located within the Askja fissure swarm, but was accompanied by caldera subsidence in the Bárðarbunga central volcano 45 km to the southwest. Geophysical monitoring of the eruption identified a seismic swarm that migrated from Bárðarbunga to the Holuhraun eruption site over the course of 2 weeks. In orde...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Cone-sheet swarms provide vital information on the interior of volcanic systems and their plumbing systems (e.g. Burchardt et al. 2013). This information is important for the interpretation of processes and dynamics of modern and ancient volcanic systems, and is therefore vital for assessing volcanic hazards and to reduce risks to modern society. T...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
To increase our knowledge on magma emplacement in the shallow crust by using a multi-scale approach. We investigate the role of micro-scale flow features and magma viscosity on the large scale morphology observed from 3D outcrop models.