Tisha Lewis Ellison

Tisha Lewis Ellison
University of Georgia | UGA · Department of Language & Literacy Education

PhD, SUNY Albany

About

47
Publications
16,738
Reads
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419
Citations
Introduction
Dr. Tisha Lewis Ellison is an Associate Professor in the Department of Language and Literacy Education at The University of Georgia. Her research explores the intersections of family literacy, multimodality, and digital and STEM literacy practices among Black and Latinx families and adolescents.
Additional affiliations
August 2016 - December 2016
University of Georgia
Position
  • Professor
August 2010 - May 2016
Georgia State University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)

Publications

Publications (47)
Article
The constant dehumanization of Black fathers and boys in the media, education, politics, pop culture, and society is traumatic. Deficit perspectives and a racialized political climate often negatively portray the moral, familial, and relational practices that Black fathers and boys engage in with their family members in their homes. Using humanizin...
Article
Using autoethnography to critically analyze personal and cultural experiences, we use the notion of “home” metaphorically through (a) academia—of our traumatic experiences as African American and Latinx women seeking acceptance in academic institutions despite blatant inequities, discrimination, and racism; and (b) intergenerational family and ance...
Book
This book is a roadmap to the key decisions, processes, and procedures to use when synthesizing qualitative literacy research. Covering the major types of syntheses - including the dissertation literature review, traditional literature review, integrative literature review, meta-synthesis, and meta-ethnography - Compton-Lilly, Rogers, and Lewis Ell...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines how three African American girls, ages 10 to 18, used journaling and interviews to better understand science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) as part of their literate identities. Drawing on prior work about literate identities, the authors introduce the concept of literate intersectional identities, which desc...
Article
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In this meta‐ethnography, the authors analyze the metaphors that inhabit highly cited examples of family literacy scholarship. Meta‐ethnography is a methodology, as described by Noblit and Hare, in which metaphors are analyzed as linguistic tools; in this article, they are used to compare and synthesize understandings across existing ethnographic f...
Article
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This article examines the ways African American children and their parents "story" themselves in relation to digital literacies, race, and the digital divide. Drawing from two interconnected qualitative, ethnographic research case studies about African American children's and parents' digital literacy practices, and using counter-storytelling as a...
Article
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Some research has explored perspectives held by the homeless on technology use (Borchard, 2010; Eyrich-Garg, 2010, 2011; Harpin, Davis, Low, & Gilroy, 2016; Hersberger, 2002/2003; Pollio, Batey, Bender, Ferguson, & Thompson, 2013). Few studies have however focused on understanding this population’s use of technology for literacy purposes (Hendry, 2...
Article
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Building relationships with African American families through digital literacy practices
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Digital literacies abound in playing a foundational role in the rhythm and pattern of our lives, yet debates continue about how to harness them to teach and learn literacy. In an effort to humanize digital literacies, this department column offers a vast array of topics, from participatory work that pushes educators and researchers to communicate i...
Article
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This article examines the digital storytelling practices between an African American mother and son. We used agency as a theoretical framework to explore how the two exercised their own power to collaborate on their digital story. As digital technologies became part of their practice, challenges and tensions arose when both participants attempted t...
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In this research, literacy scholars present the voices of the people who live in the parks near their state capital and university in a south-eastern city in the United States. Through the recorded, transcribed and analyzed conversations, we report the literacy practices of the people in the parks and their insights into the nested state and univer...
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Building relationships between teachers, school administrators, parents, and students is an ongoing process, and the core component of such relationships is teaching and learning. There is much to learn about developing supportive relationships that encourage today's diverse students and their parents in the U.S. However, there is an ongoing argume...
Chapter
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Living life as an African American woman is a necessary prerequisite for producing Black feminist thought because within Black women’s communities thought is validated and produced with reference to a particular set of historical, material, and epistemological conditions.
Article
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This case study examines one African American adolescent male's digital choices and experiences during the creation of a digital story about Minecraft. This study introduces digital participatory choice cultures as a framework to consider how he might recognize and use existing meaning-making and composition strategies to bridge what young people k...
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This article uses counter-storytelling to examine how four urban African American mothers understand and discuss the role of Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in their children's education. Counter-storytelling is used as an oppositional framework to dominant stories privileged by educational systems. Findings conclude how parents posit valid crit...
Data
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This article explores six effective principles for teachers to use to understand and apply Minecraft in today’s classrooms. Video games have become one of the fastest growing forms of media for youth and adult consumers. Minecraft, a multiplayer online game (MOG), is one of the most popular video games to date. By allowing its players to build simu...
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We examine the impact of Becoming a Nation of Readers: The Report of the Commission on Reading (BNR) (Anderson, Hiebert, Scott, & Wilkinson, 1985) with the idea of extending literacy learning beyond the early grades, describing present-day conceptions of secondary-school literacy learning, and calling to further extend the concept of extended liter...
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This qualitative participatory action research study provides two case studies to demonstrate how teachers in Grades 4 and 6 integrated digital tools into everyday, content-focused classroom instruction. The study demonstrates how teachers' technological pedagogical knowledge might combine with a participatory stance to encourage students to design...
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This column focuses on the interactions during family and group conversation circles that not only helped participants talk about personal, emotional, and social issues in their digital stories but also helped them make sense of artifacts and the meanings that stories carry in shared spaces and practices. This work adds to the bourgeoning dimension...
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In this paper, we examine the processes, struggles, and interactions that shape the co-construction of digital literacy programs and research for African American and Latinx parents and children in the South. The guiding questions of this piece are: (1) What do African American and Latinx 1 participants' counter-stories tell us about place-space an...
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This article describes how two African American adolescent male cousins become co-constructors and negotiators of identity while playing The Sims 2, an online life simulation computer game. Utilising literacy as social practices and multimodal practices, this article produces a framework to establish how adolescents use digital tools to construct t...
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This empirical study examines the virtual exchanges between an African American mother and son's engagement in a blog. Using literacy as social practices as a framework, this study describes how blogging was developed and used to create affinity spaces, encouraged apprenticeship models, and shaped agentic roles within their family. Attention to the...
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This article examines how an African American mother's affinity for digital tools relates to her telling of traumatic narratives, and how the very personal information contained in such narratives often problematizes the methodology of reporting qualitative research methods. These tensions include the concept of T.M.I. in qualitative research, as w...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines how an African American mother’s affinity for digital tools relates to her telling of traumatic narratives, and how the very personal information contained in such narratives often problematizes the methodology of reporting qualitative research methods. These tensions include the concept of T.M.I. in qualitative research, as w...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines how two African American females composed counter-selves using a computer motherboard and a stand-alone microphone as critical identity texts. Situated within sociocultural and critical traditions in new literacy studies and black feminist thought, the authors extend conceptions of language, literacy and black femininity via t...
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This research demonstrated how an African American mother and son communicated with each other via texting and instant messaging (IM) at home. Data from a 2007 larger ethnographic case study of a family’s digital literacy practices were collected and analyzed. Situated within the framework of New Literacy Studies and multi- modality, this research...
Chapter
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Much has been written about what children and families bring to schools. This litera- ture has helped us understand the diverse resources that families embody in their children and the degree to which schools take up these resources in their practice. This view of families as competent and supportive of their children’s learning rests on assumption...
Article
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The purpose of this review of family literacy scholarship was to examine the epistemologies underlying both family studies and reviews of family literacy studies. We were especially concerned with those epistemological issues related to the cultural, class, racial, gender, ethnic, and linguistic diversity of people served by family literacy program...
Article
Full-text available
The ways individuals use computers in the home have dramatically changed the ways we communicate, respond to information, and learn (Hawisher, Selfe, Moraski, & Pearson, 2004). Individuals have become hooked on connecting to the world on a daily basis, thereby causing a large amount of families’ time to be mediated through the Internet (Bruce, 2002...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
This project seeks to investigate how African American and five Latina adolescent girls participate, create, and understand a culturally affirming STEAM/digital literacy-related activity.