Tine Buyl

Tine Buyl
Tilburg University | UVT · Department of Organization Studies

PhD

About

24
Publications
16,765
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
785
Citations
Citations since 2017
10 Research Items
653 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
Introduction
Tine Buyl is Assistant Professor of Organization Studies at Tilburg University (the Netherlands). She received her Ph.D. from the University of Antwerp (Belgium). Her research focuses on Chief Executive Officers and the composition and dynamics of top management teams. Her work has been published in international peer-reviewed journals such as the Journal of Management, Journal of Management Studies, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Long Range Planning, the British Journal of Management, and the European Management Journal.

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Scholarship on strategic leadership has undergone considerable advancement in the 40 years since the introduction of upper echelon theory (UET). In this special issue we engage with the state-of-the-art in the field and categorize the manuscripts along a new typology of what constitutes the dominant coalition in the firm. From traditional models fo...
Article
How can new CEOs – as the architects of their top management teams (TMT) – compose the executive group to realize high performance? We attend to this question by drawing on the notion of factional subgroups. We argue that TMT change after a CEO succession event can trigger a factional faultline between executives hired by the new CEO, and executive...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, we explore how top executives affect the well-being of multiple stakeholders and long-run organizational outcomes. In the context of the 2008 global financial crisis (GFC), we examine how CEO greed impacts firms’ stance toward corporate social responsibility (CSR) prior to the onset of the GFC and how this, in turn, shapes firms’ fat...
Article
Why and when do CEOs invest in corporate social responsibility (CSR)? We theorize how CEOs' intrinsic motivations – their social values – and the incentivizing context interact to determine the utility they attach to generating collectively beneficial outcomes in decision-making, subsequently manifested in organizations' CSR investments. Based on a...
Article
Full-text available
Sustainable development at the corporate level requires balancing social, environmental, and financial performance goals. Achieving such “triple bottom line” (TBL) performance is a very challenging task. In this study, we explore the role the organization's top management team (TMT) plays in leading their organization towards corporate sustainabili...
Article
Full-text available
How do CEOs react to attainment discrepancies in their organizations’ performance? Scholars have generally argued that (only) when performance falls below a certain aspiration level do CEOs intend to change the organization’s strategy. However, empirical evidence on this issue is ambiguous and inconclusive. We address this puzzle directly by studyi...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, we investigate how CEO narcissism, in combination with corporate governance practices, impacts organizational risk-taking and how this in turn affects organizations’ resilience to environmental conditions. We examine these issues in the context of the recent collapse (systemic shock) of the U.S. banking industry in September 2008, us...
Article
Previous literature has suggested both positive and negative effects of age diversity on labor productivity: positive because of the potential knowledge complementarities between employees of different ages and negative because of the age-related value differences that might reduce cohesion and cooperation, hampering firm performance. Using a Belgi...
Article
We present a comprehensive and integrative study of non-CEO executive mobility, proposing two complementary approaches: (1) mobility as a reactive process, driven by poor organizational performance (the dominant approach in prior literature) and (2) mobility as a proactive process, reflecting incumbent TMTs' patterns of (exploratory and exploitativ...
Article
To date, performance-based and seniority-based pay remain among the most popular and widely used pay policies to incentivize employees and maximize workforce performance. We take a structural contingency approach and present a macro-level study determining when these policies are effective in improving firm-level workforce productivity. First, buil...
Article
In this study, we investigate the impact of performance feedback on executives’ exploratory search in a sample of large U.S. organizations in four different industries, ranging from stable to dynamic. We empirically validate our proposition that the heuristics executives use to respond to performance feedback differ depending on their industry. In...
Article
Prior literature has put forward both positive and negative effects of age diversity on organizational performance. Using 3,888 Belgian organizational observations from 2008 to 2011, we unraveled these countervailing effects in two ways. First, we distinguished between two dimensions of age diversity: age variety and polarization. We found that age...
Article
Full-text available
Organizational leadership is generally distributed between the chief executive officer (CEO) and the top management team (TMT) members. Building on this observation, we present an empirical investigation of the cues for CEOs to delegate decision-making influence to particular TMT members. In the literature, explanations both based on expertise and...
Article
Organizational ambidexterity, or the combination of exploratory and exploitative organizational behavior, is believed to be a key precursor for long-term organizational success. In this study, we explore the impact of the composition of the top management team (TMT), in particular the heterogeneity in the TMT members' knowledge bases (i.e., TMT kno...
Article
In this study, we analyze the TMT’s attention focus on exploration and exploitation in a dynamic context. Building on the theory on organizational inertia, we propose that both attention focuses will be path dependent and self-reinforcing. Furthermore, we investigate the effects of organizational performance, the CEO’s organizational tenure and the...
Article
Full-text available
Past research indicates that the effect of TMT functional diversity on firm performance is equivocal. We address this issue by focusing on the integrative role of the CEO, postulating that the CEO's expertise and background characteristics affect the TMT functional diversity–firm performance relationship, because of their impact on the exchange and...
Article
Full-text available
In the last decade, a fundamental phenomenon came to the fore in the business environment: more and more companies are offering total solutions to their customer instead of standardized products or services. Although this trend has already been studied extensively in literature, little has been said about the impact of this phenomenon on the suppli...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose – The main purpose of this study is to develop a managerial framework about a company's channel management when it shifts from a standardized product approach to a strategy of total solutions. Two dimensions of channel management have been investigated: channel design and relationship management (comprising relationship quality and relation...

Network

Cited By