Timothy Morton

Timothy Morton
Rice University · Department of English

About

76
Publications
21,212
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Introduction

Publications

Publications (76)
Article
Þýðingin sem birtist í Ritinu að þessu sinni er eftir Timothy Morton, heimspeking og prófessor við Rice háskóla. Morton er einn áhrifamesti heimspekingur okkar tíma en hann vinnur á mörkum margvíslegra list- og fræðigreina. Nýverið hélt hann fyrirlestur í Safnahúsinu sem fjallaði um vistfræðilega listsköpun og listsköpun á tímum aukinnar vistfræðil...
Book
Full-text available
Design and Futures is a major collection of essays, manifestos, interviews and peer-reviewed articles, edited by Stuart Candy (Carnegie Mellon University) and Cher Potter (Victoria and Albert Museum), documenting 'design futures' discourse and practice around the world. First published as back-to-back volumes in the open access Journal of Futures S...
Chapter
I keep up with research on schizophrenia because my brother Steve has it. (Hence, reading Deleuze and Guattari is always a little strange for me, shall we say.) One hypothesis is that a neurotoxin released by toxoplasmosis gives rise to symptoms of schizophrenia and possibly Alzheimer’s. Toxoplasmosis is caused by Toxoplasma gondii, a protozoan sym...
Article
Ecological images—the fragile web of life, NASA's “blue marble” Earth, everything being connected—appeal to our love for the planet's being and our faith that there is still hope, if we can just care enough. But this imagery is neither true nor false. In other words, when we visualize these sorts of things, we don't know what we're talking about! W...
Article
Before you can have something, there needs to be a “space” for you to have it in. That’s a really crude paraphrase of some of martin heidegger. Naturally we now need to tread carefully through some of the terms here, such as “have,” “in” and “before.” What this means is that comedy is the ground state of innovation, to borrow a term from quantum th...
Article
This essay uses the thought of Luce Irigaray as a very powerful way to imagine what ecological beings such as meadows and whales are like. For reasons given yet implicit in Irigaray's work, it is possible to extend what she argues about woman to include any being whatsoever. In particular, it is shown that to exist is to defy the so-called law of n...
Article
Not a day goes by in the 2010s without some humanities scholars becoming quite exercised about the term Anthropocene. In case we need reminding, Anthropocene names the geological period starting in the later eighteenth century when, after the invention of the steam engine, humans began to deposit layers of carbon in Earth’s crust. Paul Crutzen and...
Article
Global warming is a manifestation of the Anthropocene, the moment at which human history has intersected decisively with geological time. Since the later eighteenth century, humans began to deposit a thin layer of carbon in Earth’s crust. The fossil fuel burning that caused this has given rise to logarithmic increases in Earth’s average temperature...
Article
The geological era known as the Anthropocene marks a decisive intersection between human history and geological time. Simultaneously, Western philosophy began to posit the existence of entities that could be thought and computed but not directly perceived. This double disruption ends the functionality of the concept Nature. Yet Nature itself, conce...
Article
Having set global warming in irreversible motion, we are facing the possibility of ecological catastrophe. But the environmental emergency is also a crisis for our philosophical habits of thought, confronting us with a problem that seems to defy not only our control but also our understanding. Global warming is perhaps the most dramatic example of...
Article
The fact of the Anthropocene makes the metaphysics of presence radically unthinkable. At the same time, and for the same reasons, it reveals to humans a non-totalisable set of unique beings, which this essay calls objects. These objects have a past and a future, but no present.
Article
Full-text available
The Anthropocene is the radical intersection of human history and geological time. Humans have belatedly realised that they have become a geophysical force on a planetary scale. This creeping realisation has an Oedipal logic, that is to say, it is a strange loop in which one level of activity---industrial agriculture and the swiftly ensuing industr...
Article
Scarcity as a concept places an emphasis on limits and the restrictions that there might be on the supply of resources, energy and materials. Timothy Morton, who is Professor of English at the University of California, Davis, and has written extensively on philosophy and ecology, among other subjects, questions philosophically this emphasis on limi...
Article
This essay is one of the first to explore the implications of the emerging philosophy known as object-oriented ontology (OOO) for the study and creation of poetry. OOO provides a powerful conceptual toolbox for understanding how poetry works. Furthermore, poetry itself may be seen as a template for understanding how any entity—a human, a ball of...
Article
What is the nature of mastery? The ecological polity to come depends upon receiving and interpreting messages coming from the environment. In turn this means having some kind of susceptibility to such messages, whether in terms of accurately attuned technological instruments, or in terms of the more inward, psychological acceptance of that suscepti...
Article
This article discusses the dark ecology of elegy. It also explains the materiality of elegy as essentially environmental, but with a difference. It then goes even further by positing a resistance to the collapse of subjectobject dualism so dear to deep ecology, and once so dear to the historical definitions of Romanticism. This dark ecology surpris...
Chapter
What, I hear you ask? How can you put the word ‘practice’ next to the most cerebral, recherché word in philosophy and cultural theory? And how, for goodness’ sake, can I expect you to take it seriously in a volume about teaching ecological criticism, for heaven’s sake? By the time you finish reading this essay, however, you may well agree with its...
Article
Generations have trod, have trod, have trod; And all is seared with trade; bleared, smeared with toil; And wears man's smudge and shares man's smell: the soil Is bare now, nor can foot feel, being shod. And for all this, nature is never spent; There lives the dearest freshness deep down things. The experience of nothingness comes neither from conce...
Article
The further scholarship investigates life forms (ecology, evolutionary biology and microbiology) the less those forms can be said to have a single, independent and lasting identity. The further scholarship delves into texts (deconstruction) the less they too can be said to have a single, independent and lasting identity. This similarity is not simp...
Article
Now is a very good time to rethink what we mean by matter, as Jane Bennett's highly engaging study argues. The time is ripe for several reasons. The current ecological crisis, far from imminent but rather fully underway, has given rise to predictive and mapping instruments that can measure climate in real time. Being a very complex derivative of we...
Chapter
It sounds perverse to read Byron as an ecological writer, at least in the terms prescribed by our common perception of him as the ultimate poet of existential irony. As Esther Hibbard put it, almost forty years ago, ‘modern criticism has shown that [Byron] … rebelled against the romantic concept of nature’.1English Bards and Scotch Reviewers depict...
Chapter
‘Place’, and in particular the local, has become a key term in Romantic ecocriticism’s rage against the machine. Rhetorical affect is directly proportional to marginalization, maintaining an ironic barrier to genuine interrelationships between beings.1 I call it ‘beautiful soul syndrome’ after Hegel’s characterization of Romantic subjectivity that...
Book
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822) was an extraordinary poet, playwright and essayist, revolutionary both in his ideas and in his artistic theory and practice. This collection of original essays by an international group of specialists is a comprehensive survey of the life, works and times of this radical Romantic writer. Three sections cover Shelley...
Chapter
Rousseau’s phrase, misattribued to a condescending Marie Antoinette, “Let them eat cake!”; the food riots precipitated in England during the wartime embargo;1 the fact that Napoleon and Wellington had meals named after them; all indicate the diverse significance of food in the Romantic period. All periods have their styles of eating, their table ma...
Chapter
the voice of dead time, in still vibrations, is breathed from these dumb things… (Mary Shelley, The Last Man, III x 336) The word “culture” is a contested term. It hesitates between “nature” and “nurture,” an insoluble conundrum. It can, for instance, mean a corporation's management structures or the medium in which people come to discover their ex...
Article
Eighteenth-Century Life 23.2 (1999) 97-101 In 1708 William King (1663-1712), lawyer, vicar-general of Armargh, and keeper of the records at Dublin Castle, published a Menippean satire, The Art of Cookery in Imitation of Horace's "Art of Poetry" (1709). Though King had been an able Tory satirist, his success with The Art of Cookery drew upon popular...
Chapter
‘The Constabiliad’ (1769) and a revision entitled ‘The Consuliad’ (1770) are superb narratives of forgery. They enact Chatterton’s entry into political life, the move from Rowley to Chatterton the satirist, from Bristol to London, from Aldermen to the Grafton ministry, which he invokes coyly by using coded proper names without specific referents li...
Article
George Eliot lamented the decoration of her and George Henry Lewes's house, for which Owen Jones, the man behind the color scheme for the Crystal Palace, designed wallpaper and chose draperies. At the beginning of his chapter on Middlemarch in Novels Behind Glass, a detailed historicist study of Thackeray, Gaskell, Dickens, Eliot and the Great Exhi...

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