Timothy A C Lamont

Timothy A C Lamont
Lancaster University | LU · Lancaster Environment Centre

PhD

About

25
Publications
16,394
Reads
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607
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2020 - December 2021
Mars Sustainable Solutions
Position
  • Marine Science Officer
July 2015 - August 2015
Wilderness Trust
Position
  • Conservation Management Intern
June 2015 - July 2015
UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre
Position
  • Computational Modelling Intern
Education
October 2016 - June 2020
University of Exeter
Field of study
  • Coral reef ecology
October 2015 - September 2016
Imperial College London
Field of study
  • Ecology, Evolution & Conservation
October 2012 - June 2015
University of Cambridge
Field of study
  • Natural Sciences

Publications

Publications (25)
Article
Full-text available
Coral reefs are increasingly degraded by climate-induced bleaching and storm damage. Reef recovery relies on recruitment of young fishes for the replenishment of functionally important taxa. Acoustic cues guide the orientation, habitat selection, and settlement of many fishes, but these processes may be impaired if degradation alters reef soundscap...
Article
Full-text available
Local and global stressors have led to rapid declines in coral reef health around the world. A range of active restoration techniques have recently been introduced in attempts to stem and reverse this decline, but their efficacy is debated. In particular, restoration faces the challenge of scale; successful projects must be deployed quickly over la...
Article
Full-text available
Historically, ecological monitoring of marine habitats has primarily relied on labour-intensive, non-automated survey methods. The field of passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) has demonstrated the potential of this practice to automate surveying in marine habitats. This has primarily been through the use of ‘ecoacoustic indices’ to quantify attribute...
Article
Full-text available
Mass coral bleaching events may have disproportionate effects on branching corals, leading to coral community restructuring, reduced biodiversity, and decreased structural complexity. This affects overall reef health and resilience. Functionally important, fast-growing branching Acropora corals were a historically dominant and vital component of In...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic noise impacts are pervasive across taxa, ecosystems and the world. Here, we experimentally test the hypothesis that protecting vulnerable habitats from noise pollution can improve animal reproductive success. Using a season-long field manipulation with an established model system on the Great Barrier Reef, we demonstrate that limiting...
Article
Indonesia’s coral reefs have been severely damaged by global and local stressors, and a range of active restoration techniques are now being used in attempts to rebuild degraded reefs. However, it is difficult to summarise Indonesia’s restoration efforts as a whole due to a lack of consistent reporting. Here, we first discuss Indonesia's legal poli...
Article
Full-text available
Passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) involves recording the sounds of animals and environments for research and conservation. PAM is used in a range of contexts across terrestrial, marine and freshwater environments. However, financial constraints limit applications within aquatic environments; these costs include the high cost of submersible acoustic...
Article
Full-text available
Pantropical degradation of coral reefs is prompting considerable investment in their active restoration. However, current measures of restoration success are based largely on coral cover, which does not fully reflect ecosystem function or reef health. Soundscapes are an important aspect of reef health; loud and diverse soundscapes guide the recruit...
Article
Full-text available
Underwater passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) is of growing importance for monitoring the health of aquatic environments. Standard practices use expensive hydrophones to sample soundscapes. They must either be linked to surface recording rigs or use autonomous instrumentation which comes at a premium cost. Although citizen science projects could be...
Article
Full-text available
An anthropogenic cacophony Sound travels faster and farther in water than in air. Over evolutionary time, many marine organisms have come to rely on sound production, transmission, and reception for key aspects of their lives. These important behaviors are threatened by an increasing cacophony in the marine environment as human-produced sounds have...
Article
Anthropogenic noise is a pollutant of global concern that has been shown to have a wide range of detrimental effects on multiple taxa. However, most noise studies to-date consider only overall population means, ignoring the potential for intraspecific variation in responses. Here, we used field experiments on Australia's Great Barrier Reef to asses...
Article
Full-text available
Coral reefs worldwide are increasingly damaged by anthropogenic stressors, necessitating novel approaches for their management. Maintaining healthy fish communities counteracts reef degradation, but degraded reefs smell and sound less attractive to settlement-stage fishes than their healthy states. Here, using a six-week field experiment, we demons...
Article
Full-text available
Coral reefs are exceptionally biodiverse and human dependence on their ecosystem services is high. Reefs experience significant direct and indirect anthropogenic pressures, and provide a sensitive indicator of coastal ocean health, climate change, and ocean acidification, with associated implications for society. Monitoring coral reef status and tr...
Article
Full-text available
Warming increases the metabolic demand of consumers¹, strengthening their feeding interactions². This could alter energy fluxes3–5 and even amplify extinction rates within the food web6–8. Such effects could simplify the structure and dynamics of ecological networks9,10, although an empirical test in natural systems has been lacking. Here, we teste...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic noise is a recognized global pollutant, affecting a wide range of nonhuman animals. However, most research considers only whether noise pollution has an impact, ignoring that individuals within a species or population exhibit substantial variation in responses to stress. Here, we first outline how intrinsic characteristics (e.g., body...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic noise can negatively impact many taxa worldwide. It is possible that in noisy, high-disturbance environments, the range and severity of impacts could diminish over time, but the influence of previous disturbance remains untested in natural conditions. This study demonstrates the effects of motorboat noise on the physiology of an endem...
Article
Full-text available
Populations of fishes provide valuable services for billions of people, but face diverse and interacting threats that jeopardize their sustainability. Human population growth and intensifying resource use for food, water, energy and goods are compromising fish populations through a variety of mechanisms, including overfishing, habitat degradation a...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental warming places physiological constraints on organisms, which may be mitigated by their feeding behaviour. Theory predicts that consumers should increase their feeding selectivity for more energetically valuable resources in warmer environments to offset the disproportionate increase in metabolic demand relative to ingestion rate. This...
Article
Full-text available
Freshwater gastropods often contribute significantly to freshwater ecosystem biomass and are a vital component of many consumers' diets. They can also serve as a nutrient resource for terrestrial predators, representing an important example of nutrient transfer across a habitat boundary. This study uses bankside middens to provide evidence of preda...
Article
Full-text available
Jewel damselfish, Plectroglyphidodon lacrymatus, aggressively defend small territories on coral reefs in which they cultivate lawns of edible macroalgae. Pairwise frequency counts showed that juvenile coral density was lower inside damselfish territories than that in adjacent non-defended areas on lagoon patch reefs in Kenya. These differences in c...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Communication and the gathering of information underpins all animal behaviour and is particularly important in social species. Our focus is on vocalisations and acoustic cues; how they mediate within- and between-group cooperation and conflict, are used in life-history decisions, and aid transfer of information between different species. We work on a wide range of bird species (particularly in Africa and Australia), wild fish populations (in French Polynesia and Australia) and our habituated wild population of dwarf mongooses in South Africa (dwarfmongooseresearch.weebly.com).
Project
Experimental work to assess how anthropogenic (man-made) noise and other human disturbances may affect animal behaviour, physiology, development and fitness. Working on a range of study systems, including fish, marine invertebrates, and terrestrial mammals and birds.