Timothy Mathias Davidson

Timothy Mathias Davidson
California State University, Sacramento | CSUS · Department of Biological Sciences

PhD

About

23
Publications
8,537
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
300
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - present
California State University, Sacramento
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
February 2014 - February 2016
University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa & Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
Position
  • NSF Post doc - Control of a native and introduced foundation species by marine and terrestrial enemies
January 2012 - January 2016
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
Position
  • STRI Post doc - Latitudinal variation in biotic interactions between an introduced crustacean and mangroves

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
Lateral erosion of saltmarshes is affected by many abiotic and biotic factors. While abiotic factors are typically regarded as primary drivers of erosion, biotic influences such as burrowing or bioturbating taxa can also extensively modify the physical structure of this marine habitat. Many estuaries on the Pacific coast of North America have been...
Article
Full-text available
Consumer effects on the structure and extent of habitat-forming foundation species such as trees and coral reefs are well known, but the role of non-consumer interactions is less studied. Red mangroves are major foundation species at the land–sea interface, creating critical habitat in the tropics and subtropics. The complex aerial roots of mangrov...
Article
Full-text available
Bioerosion, the breakdown of hard substrata by organisms, is a fundamental and widespread ecological process that can alter habitat structure, biodiversity and biogeochemical cycling. Bioerosion occurs in all biomes of the world from the ocean floor to arid deserts, and involves a wide diversity of taxa and mechanisms with varying ecological effect...
Article
Full-text available
The enemy release hypothesis (ERH) posits that introduced species often leave their enemies behind when introduced to a new range. This release from enemies may allow introduced species to achieve higher growth and reproduction and may explain why some invaders flourish in new locations. Red mangroves (Rhizophora mangle) were introduced to Hawai'i...
Article
Full-text available
Biotic resistance from native consumers can reduce the abundance and impacts of introduced species. Previous studies documented the escape of the introduced alga Kappaphycus alvarezii from abandoned farms in Bocas del Toro, Panama. Both attached and unattached aggregations of this invasive alga accumulated on and smothered native corals and seagras...
Article
Full-text available
Host preference of symbionts evolves from fitness trade-offs. However, it is often unclear how interspecific variations in host response traits influence this evolutionary process. Using the association between the polyclad flatworm Paraprostatum echinolittorinae and its intertidal snail hosts on the Pacific Coast of Panama, we assessed how a symbi...
Article
Herbivores are important to ecosystems because they transfer energy stored in plant matter to other organisms. However, when herbivores occur in high abundances, they can become pests and harm the plants that form the basis of food webs. Mangroves are saltwater tolerant trees found along most tropical and subtropical shorelines. Because mangroves l...
Poster
Full-text available
Shipworms (Teredinidae) are marine borers that utilize wood for both housing and food, and are present in coastal, shelf, and pelagic habitats. Our current research includes distribution, dispersal, ocean circulation, wood degradation, phylogeny, ecology, reproductive biology, and other aspects of this bivalve group; These ˜termites of the sea’ are...
Article
Full-text available
The red alga Kappaphycus alvarezii (Doty ex P.C. Silva, 1996) has been intentionally introduced throughout the tropics for mariculture. In some cases, the alga has spread outside cultivation sites and impacts native biota. We conducted surveys of two sites in Bocas del Toro, Panama, where non-native K. alvarezii was previously cultivated to determi...
Article
Full-text available
Animals can exert a strong influence on the structure and function of foundation species such as mangroves. Because mangroves live at the interface of land and sea, both terrestrial and marine species affect them, including numerous herbivores and boring species. These organisms can affect the fecundity, performance, and morphology of mangroves. In...
Article
Full-text available
By creating novel habitats, habitat-modifying species can alter patterns of diversity and abundance in marine communities. Many sea urchins are important habitat modifiers in tropical and temperate systems. By eroding rocky substrata, urchins can create a mosaic of urchin-sized cavities or pits separated by exposed, often flat surfaces. These micro...
Article
Full-text available
Increases in temperature associated with global climate change are predicted to elicit drastic changes, especially to marine and freshwater ecosystems. Even small changes in water temperature (1-2. °C) may alter rates of biological activity, with concomitant effects to communities and ecosystems. The biological erosion of marine habitats and struct...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Increases in water temperature associated with global climate change are predicted to elicit drastic changes to marine and freshwater ecosystems. Even small changes in water temperature (1-2°C) may alter the rate of biological activity, particularly in poikilotherms, with concomitant effects to communities and ecosyste...
Article
Marine wood-borers and burrowers can substantially alter habitats and human-created structures in the marine environment. While many marine borers and burrowers occur only in a few substrata, burrowing sphaeromatid isopods can damage a variety of substrata. On the Pacific coast of North America, burrowing by the non-native isopod, Sphaeroma quoianu...
Article
Full-text available
Claw morphology and prey consumption rates of two estuarine crab species were compared: the introduced European green crab, Carcinus maenas, and the native Dungeness crab, Cancer magister. For crabs of similar weight, both the crusher and cutter claws of C. maenas were larger and exhibited higher mechanical advantage values of the claw lever system...
Article
Full-text available
The ocean provides humanity with many services and goods, including clean air, minerals, and food. Sustainable use and management of our marine resources are important to ensure that these resources are available for future generations. The turn-based activity presented in this article teaches students the challenges of managing a sustainable fishe...
Article
Full-text available
The non-native isopod, Sphaeroma quoianum, has invaded many estuaries of the Pacific coast of North America. It creates extensive burrow microhabitats in intertidal and subtidal substrata that provide habitat for estuarine organisms. We sampled burrows to determine the effects of substratum type on the community of inquilines (burrow inhabitants)....
Article
Full-text available
The New Zealand mud snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray, 1843) is a common invasive species in fresh and brackish water ecosystems in Europe, Australia, Japan, and North America. In some invaded habitats, P. antipodarum can reach high densities (over 500,000 snails m -2 ) and dominate the biomass of the benthos, leading to detrimental impacts to n...
Article
Full-text available
The Australasian burrowing isopod, Sphaeroma quoianum, was introduced to San Francisco Bay, California in the late 19(th) century and is now found in fifteen estuaries ranging from San Quintin Bay, Baja California to Yaquina Bay, Oregon. In some estuaries, S. quoianum achieve high densities, accelerate shoreline erosion, and damage maritime structu...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat use in marine invertebrates is often influenced by multiple abiotic and biotic factors. Substratum composition is one factor known to have a dramatic effect on habitat selection. The Australasian burrowing isopod (Sphaeroma quoianum, H. Milne Edwards 1840) is a common introduced species in many estuaries on the Pacific coast of North Americ...
Article
The Australasian burrowing isopod (Sphaeroma quoianum) has been introduced to numerous embayments along the Pacific coast of North America. In some bays, populations of S. quoianum can exceed tens of thousands of individuals m−3 and bioturbation by the isopods can exacerbate shoreline erosion. Within their native range, however, studies recognize S...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I am conducting a large scale herbivory experiment across many sites and would like to examine if nutrient concentrations/availability (namely N and P) may also vary between mangrove sites. My primary hypothesis is herbivory will vary, but I'd like to test alternative hyp's as well (including if nutrient levels or availability varies).
Because a nutrient study is not the primary focus, I was hoping to receive some advice for ways to measure nutrient levels/availability between sites that is relatively straight forward. Does anyone have any advice or references to recommend?
I realize nutrient manipulations would be ideal (c/o Feller, Lovelock) but I just do not have time for it. A colleague dissuaded me from examining the soil chemistry because it may not inform whats available to the plant. Perhaps examining the leaf chemistry would be informative?

Network

Cited By