Timothy D. Baird

Timothy D. Baird
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | VT · Department of Geography

PhD

About

24
Publications
4,687
Reads
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903
Citations
Introduction
My research and teaching focus on conservation, development and sustainability, especially in the Global South. Recently, my work in rural Africa has looked at how local groups are adapting to protected areas, engaging a globalizing world, and embracing new technologies. I’m also interested in how social networks, how the creative process evolves, and how people respond to disruption.
Additional affiliations
May 2005 - May 2012
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Position
  • Graduate Student Trainee
Education
December 2007 - May 2012
August 2004 - December 2007
August 1995 - May 1999
Bowdoin College
Field of study
  • Economics

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
Throughout the developing world, mobile phones are spreading rapidly into rural areas where subsistence livelihoods, biodiversity conservation, and human-wildlife conflict (HWC) are each common. Despite this trend, little is known about the relationship between mobile phones and HWC in conservation landscapes. This paper examines this relationship...
Article
Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information:This article describes and analyzes a classroom assignment to promote intrinsic motivation for learning in college students. Here, grades and instructor expectations for content are viewed as students’ primary motivations for learning, and correspondingly present o...
Article
Full-text available
The resilience of natural resource management (NRM) institutions are largely contingent on the capacities of the people and organizations within those institutions to learn, innovate, and adapt, both individually and collectively. These capacities may be powerfully constrained or catalyzed by the nature of the relationships between the various enti...
Article
Full-text available
It is commonly understood that students' autonomous motivation and individualistic orientations and instructors' autonomy support are important for student-centered learning (SCL). However, few studies have examined this assumption. To help researchers and practitioners design more engaging SCL experiences across diverse cultural contexts, this stu...
Article
Full-text available
Mobile phones are recognized as important new tools for rural development in the Global South, but few studies have examined how phones can shape social networks. This study documents a new type of social tie, enabled by mobile phones, that to our knowledge has not previously been discussed in academic literature. In 2018, we discovered that Maasai...
Article
Full-text available
Evidence shows that mobile phones can improve agricultural productivity in Sub-Saharan Africa, yet few studies examine gender disparities in mobile phone ownership and use, and how they relate to the gender gap in agricultural productivity. This research gathers survey data on 279 male and female household heads in four villages in Iringa, Tanzania...
Article
This response to Lee and Hannafin’s A design framework for enhancing engagement in student-centered learning: own it, learn it, and share it (OLSit) (Lee and Hannafin, Educational Technology Research and Development 64:707–734, 2016) discusses its helpful design guidelines from a practitioner’s perspective. OLSit provides a blueprint for chancetaki...
Article
Full-text available
Mobile phone use is increasing in Sub-Saharan Africa, spurring a growing focus on mobile phones as tools to increase agricultural yields and incomes on smallholder farms. However, the research to date on this topic is mixed, with studies finding both positive and neutral associations between phones and yields. In this paper we examine perceptions a...
Article
Full-text available
To explore new opportunities to promote self-regulated learning (SRL) across a variety of contexts, this study applies a novel assignment called Pink Time in seven different courses at two universities. The assignment asks students to "skip class, do anything you want, and give yourself a grade." In each case, instructors adapted Pink Time to fit t...
Article
Full-text available
Mobile phones have been heralded by many as promising new tools to empower women throughout the Global South. However, some have asserted that new information and communication technologies (ICTs) may serve to amplify disparities between more powerful and less powerful people. Few studies have examined which women stand to benefit and under what co...
Article
In the last century, mobile pastoralists around the world have transitioned to more sedentary lifestyles. Traditionally mobile people can be both pushed to settle by environmental or political forces, and pulled by new economic activities. While researchers have examined the causes and consequences of growing sedentarization, few contemporary studi...
Article
Land-use conflict research generally focuses on conflicts where pre-existing opponents respond to the introduction of a new unwanted land-use. We select a 2008 land-use conflict to explore an understudied scenario: urban–rural fringe (URF) expansion can introduce new opposing stakeholders into areas with pre-existing unwanted land-uses. We use spat...
Article
Throughout the developing world, households are diversifying their livelihood activities to manage risk and improve their lives. Many studies have focused on the material causes and consequences of this diversification. Few, however, have examined how diversifying groups establish new patterns of communication and information exchange with others....
Article
Full-text available
Shared ecological knowledge about the impacts of biological invasions can facilitate the collective action necessary to achieve desired management outcomes. Since its introduction to an island archipelago in South America, the North American beaver has caused major changes to the ecosystem. We examined landowners’ mental models of how beavers impac...
Article
As attention to resilience grows, debates in geography have focused on the relationship between resilience and vulnerability. This discussion raises further questions that geographers may be well positioned to address: what can be done in contexts where vulnerability is desirable, or where resilience is undesirable and where innovation may be calle...
Article
Throughout developing countries, major world religions are spreading into areas important for biodiversity conservation, and little is know about the potential effects of this expansion. This paper examines the effect of religious ideals on mechanisms that underlie changes in population growth, economic development, and land conversion within a pol...
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Full-text available
"Despite progress in interdisciplinary research, difficulties remain. In this paper, we argue that scholars, educators, and practitioners need to critically rethink the ways in which interdisciplinary research and training are conducted. We present epistemological pluralism as an approach for conducting innovative, collaborative research and study....
Article
Studies that examine how helping behavior varies among individuals shed light on both the extent and the variation of human cooperative tendencies and the potential fragility of genealogical kinship in structuring prosociality. Here we explore the importance of both reciprocal altruism and kin selection in structuring cooperation in a contemporary...
Article
Biodiversity conservation has been criticized for undermining or ignoring social well-being. Currently efforts to mutually promote social justice, rural development, and biodiversity conservation, which have been contentious and yielded mixed results, continue to spread despite a general dearth of effective management strategies. We contend that so...
Article
Recent studies have identified poverty reduction near parks and protected areas, findings that challenge an extensive literature on the social burdens associated with protected areas. These studies move the discussion on the social dynamics of conservation forward, however, they do not offer insight into the underlying mechanisms that shape househo...
Article
Parks and protected areas throughout the world can create place fragments where park boundaries seek to preserve and protect landscapes by dissociating social and ecological processes. Along these lines, park boarders that are designed to privilege one set of processes over another or obfuscate some processes altogether will impoverish all processe...
Article
Full-text available
Efforts to reduce persistent poverty and redress conflict between local communities and parks and protected areas PAs in the developing world have taken many forms including community based conservation (CBC) and integrated conservation and development projects (ICDPs). Generally these formalized efforts have had mixed results with failures providi...
Article
In this study, we examine the effect of Tarangire National Park (TNP) on local perceptions of risk and how these perceptions may influence behavioral responses. Data were collected during 2004–2005 through household surveys and participatory risk mapping (PRM) in eight villages east of TNP. By identifying and rank-ordering respondents’ perceived ri...

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