Tim Whitfield

Tim Whitfield
University College London | UCL · Mental Health Sciences Unit

MSc Cognitive Neuroscience

About

35
Publications
4,296
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262
Citations
Citations since 2016
26 Research Items
254 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (35)
Preprint
Full-text available
Multimodal lifestyle-based interventions that integrate physical, mental and social stimulation could promote mental health and brain resilience against dementia. This meta-analysis examined the efficacy of dance movement interventions (DMI) on psychological health in older adults. Pre-registration was done with PROSPERO (CRD42021265112). PubMed, W...
Article
Full-text available
Background Older individuals with subjective cognitive decline (SCD) perceive that their cognition has declined but do not show objective impairment on neuropsychological tests. Individuals with SCD are at elevated risk of objective cognitive decline and incident dementia. Non-pharmacological interventions (including mindfulness-based and health se...
Article
Full-text available
Mindfulness-based programs (MBPs) are increasingly utilized to improve mental health. Interest in the putative effects of MBPs on cognitive function is also growing. This is the first meta-analysis of objective cognitive outcomes across multiple domains from randomized MBP studies of adults. Seven databases were systematically searched to January 2...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives Deepening our understanding of the mechanisms by which meditation practices impact well-being and human flourishing is essential for advancing the science of meditation. A recent phenomenologically grounded classification system distinguishes attentional, constructive, and deconstructive forms of meditation based on the psychological mec...
Article
Subjective cognitive decline (SCD) denotes self‐reported cognitive concerns in the absence of objective cognitive impairment. Individuals with SCD convert to dementia at twice the annual rate of healthy controls, with relatively poorer cognition in SCD conferring additional risk. Non‐pharmacological interventions are currently undergoing intensive...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The Lifetime of Experiences Questionnaire (LEQ) assesses complex mental activity across the life-course and has been associated with brain and cognitive health. The different education systems and occupation classifications across countries represent a challenge for international comparisons. The objectives of this study were four-fold:...
Article
Up to 40% of dementias may be preventable via risk factor modification. This inference has motivated the development of lifestyle interventions for reducing cognitive decline. Typically delivered to older adults face-to-face, the COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated their adaptation for remote delivery. We systematically reviewed randomized controlle...
Article
Aims To systematically review the literature on outcomes for individuals with subjective cognitive decline (SCD) with concurrent affective symptoms. To conduct a meta-analysis to establish whether either higher depressive symptoms or higher levels of anxiety increased the risk of progression SCD to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia. Meth...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Older adults experiencing subjective cognitive decline (SCD) have a heightened risk of developing dementia and frequently experience subclinical anxiety, which is itself associated with dementia risk. Objective: To understand whether subclinical anxiety symptoms in SCD can be reduced through behavioral interventions. Methods: SCD...
Chapter
Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common form of degenerative dementia. However, it can be difficult to diagnose as it shares common features with both Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). Early detection as well as accurate differentiation from other types of dementia are essential to inform management and treatm...
Article
Subjectively experienced cognitive decline (SCD), particularly when accompanied by worries, has been associated with an increased risk for dementia. Repetitive negative thinking (RNT) is a transdiagnostic process that manifests across several mental health disorders previously associated with increased vulnerability to dementia. RNT has thus been p...
Article
Subjectively experienced cognitive decline (SCD), particularly associated with worries, in older adults is known to be a risk factor for dementia. So far, only few studies focus on gender‐specific profiles in SCD. Gender differences in SCD subjects who were enrolled in the SCD‐Well trial were analyzed with regard to their perception of subjective c...
Article
Reflective pondering is an introspective mechanism conceptualised as actively seeking a solution to one’s problems. Literature has consistently demonstrated positive associations between reflective pondering and improved mental health outcomes in clinical populations. Given that poor mental health (e.g. depression, anxiety) has been associated with...
Poster
The Lifetime of Experiences questionnaire (LEQ, Valenzuela and Sachdev, 2007) is an instrument that comprehensively assesses mental activity (education/occupation and leisure activities) across the lifespan (13‐30, 30‐65, 65‐present). The LEQ has been associated with brain health outcomes and cognitive decline. Challenges for the use of this questi...
Article
Full-text available
The primary focus of mindfulness‐based program (MBP) research to date has been on mental health. More recently, attention has turned to putative effects on cognition. An evidence synthesis is required to answer the key question of ‘Do MBPs confer cognitive benefit, and if so, for whom?’ A particularly crucial distinction is whether benefits differ...
Article
Full-text available
Background In the absence of a cure or effective treatment for dementia, attention has shifted towards identifying risk factors for prevention. Subjective Cognitive Decline (SCD) describes self-perceived worsening of cognition despite unimpaired performance on neuropsychological tests. SCD has been associated with an increased dementia risk and ste...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background In the absence of a cure or effective treatment for dementia, attention has shifted towards identifying risk factors for prevention. Subjective Cognitive Decline (SCD) describes self-perceived worsening of cognition despite unimpaired performance on neuropsychological tests. SCD has been associated with an increased dementia risk and ste...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: In the absence of a cure or effective treatment for dementia, attention has shifted towards identifying risk factors for prevention. Subjective Cognitive Decline (SCD) describes self-perceived worsening of cognition despite unimpaired performance on neuropsychological tests. SCD has been associated with an increased dementia risk and st...
Article
Background: There is only limited information available about the effect of age on course of cognitive decline in patients with onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) over the age of 64 years. Objective: We compared the rate of, and factors affecting, cognitive decline in patients with AD aged < 65 years (young-onset AD), 65-74 years (middle-onset AD...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Subjectively experienced cognitive decline in older adults is an indicator of increased risk for dementia and is also associated with increased levels of anxiety symptoms. As anxiety is itself emerging as a risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia, the primary question of the present study is whether an 8-week mindfulness-based i...
Chapter
Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) can be difficult to diagnose as it shares common features with both Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease. Accurate differentiation from other types of dementia as well as early detection is essential to inform management and treatment. The use of biomarkers, particularly imaging, has greatly contributed t...
Article
Background: Dementia must be diagnosed accurately and early in the disease course to allow pathology-specific treatments to be effective. Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is often misdiagnosed as Alzheimer's disease (AD), especially at the prodromal stage. Objective: To compare the clinical and neuropsychological profiles of mild cognitive impair...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: To test the hypothesis that core and suggestive features in possible dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) would vary in their ability to predict an abnormal dopamine transporter scan and therefore a follow-up diagnosis of probable DLB. A further objective was to assess the evolution of core and suggestive features in patients with possible D...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Dementia is a devastating illness. The clinical criteria for dementia focus on cognitive and functional impairment. However patients' relationships are also affected, including their intimate and sexual relationships. These relationships are an important part of an adult life, particularly in young adults and are part of a person's ide...
Article
Full-text available
Current evidence supports the concept of a preclinical phase of Alzheimer's disease (AD) where pathological and imaging changes are present in asymptomatic individuals. Subjective cognitive impairment (SCI) may represent the earliest point on the continuum of AD. A better understanding of the baseline characteristics of this group of patients that...
Article
Full-text available
The increasing numbers of people with dementia in the UK, as well as the associated costs have led to an effort to improve dementia services for the benefit of patients, caregivers and the taxpayer. These efforts have frequently emphasised the importance of early diagnosis in dementia care. We sought to test the hypotheses that the mean cognitive s...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Dementia affects 35 million people worldwide and is currently incurable. Many cases may be preventable because regular participation in physical, mental and social leisure activities during middle age is associated with up to 47% dementia risk reduction. However, the majority of middle-aged adults are not active enough. MCI is therefor...
Chapter
Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common form of dementia. However, it can be difficult to diagnose as it shares common features with both Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). Accurate differentiation from other types of dementia as well as early detection are essential to inform management and treatment. Clinical...
Article
The primary aim of this study is to examine an association between apathy and frontal lobe dysfunction in patients with memory problems. We also aimed to look into the association between apathy and praxis. This was a retrospective cross sectional study. We selected 160 consecutive patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's dementia and Amnestic Mild Cogn...

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