Tim Seipel

Tim Seipel
Montana State University | MSU · Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences

PhD

About

44
Publications
23,353
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1,576
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2007 - January 2012
ETH Zurich
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (44)
Article
Full-text available
Crops emit a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that serve as attractants or repellents for pests and their natural enemies. Crop rotations, off-farm chemical inputs, and mechanical and cultural tactics-collectively called cropping systems-alter soil nutrients, moisture content, and microbial communities, all of which have the potential t...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the impact of biological and environmental stressors on cropping systems is essential to secure the long-term sustainability of agricultural production in the face of unprecedented climatic conditions. This study evaluated the effect of increased soil temperature and reduced moisture across three contrasting cropping systems: a no-til...
Article
Full-text available
Research in global change ecology relies heavily on global climatic grids derived from estimates of air temperature in open areas at around 2 m above the ground. These climatic grids do not reflect conditions below vegetation canopies and near the ground surface, where critical ecosystem functions occur and most terrestrial species reside. Here, we...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change and other global change drivers threaten plant diversity in mountains worldwide. A widely documented response to such environmental modifications is for plant species to change their elevational ranges. Range shifts are often idiosyncratic and difficult to generalize, partly due to variation in sampling methods. There is thus a need...
Article
Full-text available
The US Northern Great Plains is one of the largest expanses of small grain agriculture, but excessive reliance on off‐farms inputs and predicted warmer and drier conditions hinder its agricultural sustainability. In this region, the use of cover crops represents a promising approach to increase biodiversity and reduce external inputs; however littl...
Preprint
Full-text available
Climate change and other global change drivers threaten plant diversity in mountains worldwide. A widely documented response to such environmental modifications is for plant species to change their elevational ranges. Range shifts are often idiosyncratic and difficult to generalize, partly due to variation in sampling methods. There is thus a need...
Preprint
Full-text available
Research in environmental science relies heavily on global climatic grids derived from estimates of air temperature at around 2 meter above ground1-3. These climatic grids however fail to reflect conditions near and below the soil surface, where critical ecosystem functions such as soil carbon storage are controlled and most biodiversity resides4-8...
Article
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The problems with herbicide‐ and tillage‐based weed management in agriculture are well documented and have precipitated research into finding alternatives. Integrating livestock grazing into organic agroecosystems has benefits and is a viable method for terminating cover crops, yet its impacts on weed communities are largely unknown. This lack of k...
Article
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Industrialized agriculture results in simplified landscapes where many of the regulatory ecosystem functions driven by soil biological and physicochemical characteristics have been hampered or replaced with intensive, synthetic inputs. To restore long-term agricultural sustainability and soil health, soil should function as both a resource and a co...
Article
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Ground beetles are natural predators of insect pests and small seeds in agroecosystems. In semiarid cropping systems of the Northern Great Plains, there is a lack of knowledge to how ground beetles are affected by diversified cover crop rotations. In a 2-yr study (2018 and 2019), our experiment was a restricted-randomization strip-plot design, comp...
Article
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Current analyses and predictions of spatially‐explicit patterns and processes in ecology most often rely on climate data interpolated from standardized weather stations. This interpolated climate data represents long‐term average thermal conditions at coarse spatial resolutions only. Hence, many climate‐forcing factors that operate at fine spatiote...
Article
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Aims (main purpose and research question)Soil properties, including microbial composition and nutrient availability, can influence the emissions of plant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that serve as host-location cues for insect pests and their natural enemies. Agricultural practices have profound effects on soil properties, but how these influe...
Article
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Climate change is affecting global moisture and temperature patterns, and its impacts are predicted to worsen over time, posing progressively larger threats to food production. In the Northern Great Plains of the United States, climate change is forecast to increase temperature and decrease precipitation during the summer, and it is expected to neg...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding the impact of biological and environmental stresses on crop performance is essential to secure the long-term sustainability of agricultural production. How cropping systems modify weed communities and wheat yield in response to predicted climate conditions is unknown. We tested the effect of warmer, and warmer and drier conditions on...
Preprint
Full-text available
Little knowledge exists on whether soil bacteria are impacted by cropping systems and disease status in current and predicted climate scenarios. We assessed the impact of soil moisture and temperature, weed communities, and disease status on soil bacterial communities across three cropping systems: conventional no-till (CNT) utilizing synthetic pes...
Article
Full-text available
Current analyses and predictions of spatially‐explicit patterns and processes in ecology most often rely on climate data interpolated from standardized weather stations. This interpolated climate data represents long‐term average thermal conditions at coarse spatial resolutions only. Hence, many climate‐forcing factors that operate at fine spatiote...
Article
Full-text available
Cropping system characteristics such as tillage intensity, crop identity, crop-livestock integration and the application of off-farm synthetic inputs influence weed abundance, plant community composition and crop-weed competition. The resulting plant community, in turn, has species-specific effects on soil microbial communities which can impact the...
Article
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The sagebrush biome covers much of the western United States yet is at risk from ongoing disturbances. Physical disturbances such as fire often overcome the resistance of sagebrush communities to biological disturbances such as invasion by non‐native species, but the impact of burn severity or combined disturbance types on sagebrush community compo...
Article
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Despite knowledge that management practices, seasonality, and plant phenology impact soil microbiota; farming system effects on soil microbiota are not often evaluated across the growing season. We assessed the bacterial diversity in soil around wheat roots through the spring and summer of 2016 in winter wheat (Triticum aestivium L.) in Montana, US...
Preprint
Full-text available
Despite knowledge that seasonality and plant phenology impact soil microbiota, farming system effects on soil microbiota are not often evaluated across the growing season. We assessed the bacterial diversity in wheat rhizosphere soil through the spring and summer of 2016 in winter wheat (Triticum aestivium L.) in Montana, USA, from three contrastin...
Article
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Designing resilient cropping systems is essential to sustain agricultural production in the face of changing environmental and social pressures. However, the extent to which changes in farm management systems could alter resistance and resilience is largely unknown, especially in response to climate change. Plant and soil microbial community intera...
Article
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Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) is one of the most problematic weeds in western United States rangelands and sagebrush steppe. It responds positively to different forms of disturbance, and its management has proven difficult. Herbicide or targeted grazing alone often fail to provide adequate long-term control. Integrating both may afford better con...
Article
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Prevention is regarded as a cost-effective management action to avoid unwanted impacts of non-native species. However, targeted prevention can be difficult if little is known about the traits of successfully invading non-native species or habitat characteristics that make native vegetation more resistant to invasion. Here, we surveyed mountain road...
Article
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BACKGROUND Cephus cinctus infestation causes $350 million in annual losses in the Northern Great Plains. We compared infestation and parasitism of C. cinctus in spring (including Kamut; Triticum turgidum, ssp. turanicum), and winter wheat cultivars grown in organic and conventional fields in Montana. In the greenhouse, we compared C. cinctus prefer...
Article
We investigated patterns of species richness and community dissimilarity along elevation gradients using globally replicated, standardized surveys of vascular plants. We asked how these patterns of diversity are influenced by anthropogenic pressures (road construction and non-native species). Global. 2008–2015. Vascular plants. Native and non-nativ...
Article
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How does type of disturbance alter plant community composition when an invasive species with high intrinsic population growth rate is present? The sagebrush steppe in Montana, USA (45.593° N and 111.628° W, 45.595° N 111.831° W). The sagebrush steppe is a cold semi-arid steppe dominated by the native shrub Artemisia tridentata Nutt., native bunchgr...
Article
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Wheat streak mosaic, caused by Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV; family Potyviridae), is the most important and common viral disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains of North America. WSMV is transmitted by the wheat curl mite (WCM; Aceria tosichella). We evaluated how mean daily temperatures, cumulative growing degree-days, day o...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Wheat streak mosaic is caused by Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) which is vectored by the wheat curl mite (WCM, Aceria tosichella Keifer). The mite and virus can survive on multiple grass species that act as reservoirs for WSMV. Understanding the effect of alternative hosts on risk of WCM infestation and WSMV infection in newly emerged winter whea...
Article
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Recent years have seen a surge of interest in understanding patterns and processes of plant invasions into mountains. Here, we synthesise current knowledge about the spread of non-native plants along elevation gradients, emphasising the current status and impacts that these species have in alpine ecosystems. Globally, invasions along elevation grad...
Article
Monitoring the elevation limits of non-native species is a potentially sensitive means of detecting effects of environmental change on invasion dynamics and species ranges. The aim of this study was to investigate temporal changes in the distribution of non-native plant species along elevation gradients in the Swiss Alps by repeating, in 2009, a re...
Article
Mountain ecosystems have been less adversely affected by invasions of non-native plants than most other ecosystems, partially because most invasive plants in the lowlands are limited by climate and cannot grow under harsher high-elevation conditions. However, with ongoing climate change, invasive species may rapidly move upwards and threaten mid-,...
Conference Paper
Wheat streak mosaic is caused by Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) which is vectored by the wheat curl mite (WCM, Aceria tosichella Keifer). The mite and virus can survive on multiple grass species that act as reservoirs for WSMV. Understanding the effect of alternative hosts on risk of WCM infestation and WSMV infection in newly emerged winter whea...
Article
Mountain ecosystems have been less adversely affected by invasions of non-native plants than most other ecosystems, partially because most invasive plants in the lowlands are limited by climate and cannot grow under harsher high-elevation conditions. However, with ongoing climate change, invasive species may rapidly move upwards and threaten mid, a...
Article
Full-text available
Many modern environmental problems span vastly different spatial scales, from the management of local ecosystems to understanding globally interconnected processes, and addressing them through international policy. MIREN tackles one such “glocal” (global/local) environmental problem – plant invasions in mountains – through a transdisciplinary, mult...
Article
AimWe evaluated whether the performance of individuals and populations of the invasive plant Verbascum thapsus differs between its native and non-native ranges, across climate gradients, and in response to its position in a global-scaled niche model.LocationIndia (Kashmir) and Switzerland (native range) and Australia and USA (Hawaii, Montana and Or...
Chapter
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Mountains are of great significance for people and biodiversity. Although often considered to be at low risk from alien plants, recent studies suggest that mountain ecosystems are not inherently more resistant to invasion than other types of ecosystems. Future invasion risks are likely to increase greatly, in partic-ular due to climate warming and...
Article
Full-text available
Roadways are increasingly recognized as common points of entry for non-native species into natural habitats in mountainous areas. Studies were conducted within the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem from 2003 to 2007 to evaluate (1) landscape scale patterns of non-native plant richness along roadways, and (2) local scale factors influencing native and n...
Article
Aim To investigate how species richness and similarity of non-native plants varies along gradients of elevation and human disturbance. Location Eight mountain regions on four continents and two oceanic islands. Methods We compared the distribution of non-native plant species along roads in eight mountainous regions. Within each region, abundance of...
Article
Full-text available
Nonnative species richness typically declines along environmental gradients such as elevation. It is usually assumed that this is because few invaders possess the necessary adaptations to succeed under extreme environmental conditions. Here, we show that nonnative plants reaching high elevations around the world are not highly specialized stress to...
Article
Full-text available
Most studies of invasive species have been in highly modified, lowland environments, with comparatively little attention directed to less disturbed, high-elevation environments. However, increasing evidence indicates that plant invasions do occur in these environments, which often have high conservation value and provide important ecosystem service...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
An analysis of crop-weed competition across a soil-diversity and weed-pressure gradient. This work will test if soils conditioned with more diverse crops mediate less completive crop-weed relationships.
Project
This AFRI funded project is an Integrated Research (basic and applied) and Extension project. The objectives are: 1) Demonstrate to growers how agronomic practices impact the agroecosystem and resulting pest pressure. 2) Investigate the effectiveness of insecticides on pest and beneficial insect populations. 3) Describe what beneficial insects are present in northern Montana crops, and what crop rotations may favor biological control of pest species. 4) Develop a decision tool called AWaRe (Assessment of Wheat streak mosaic Risk) for predicting risk and teaching growers. 5) Communicate the results of this project to growers and use AWaRe for teaching growers about risk associated with pest complexes.