Tim Riswick

Tim Riswick
Radboud University | RU · Institute of Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies

PhD

About

25
Publications
2,165
Reads
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36
Citations
Introduction
Tim Riswick is Assistant Professor of Historical Demography at the Radboud Group for Historical Demography and Family History, Department of History, Arts History and Classics, Radboud University, Nijmegen. He is affiliated with the project ‘Lifting the burden of disease. The modernisation of health in the Netherlands: Amsterdam 1854-1940‘.
Additional affiliations
October 2019 - October 2019
Academia Sinica
Position
  • Visiting scholar
January 2019 - July 2019
University of Groningen
Position
  • Lecturer
November 2018 - December 2018
Academia Sinica
Position
  • Visiting scholar
Education
October 2012 - November 2012
Stanford University
Field of study
  • Antropology
September 2011 - August 2013
Radboud University
Field of study
  • History
January 2011 - June 2011
University of Glasgow
Field of study
  • Economic and Social History

Publications

Publications (25)
Chapter
Full-text available
My contribution will focus on the project 'Population and society in Taiwan and the Netherlands' and offer a reflection on how and why life courses in these societies were compared. Moreover, I will reflect on what are, in my opinion, the most important findings resulting from this project, and discuss what kind of research can and should still be...
Article
Full-text available
Child survival depends on the allocation of resources within the household. The size and composition of the sibling set influences parental division of resources and can in turn affect survival chances. In spite of recent advances in research on sibling effects, previous studies have often used the resource dilution hypothesis, which neglects the s...
Article
Full-text available
This special section contains a collection of articles that study how children are affected by their sibship size and composition by examining their influence on several demographic outcomes across time and space. The importance of the specific historical context, as put forward by the conditional or gendered resource dilution model, seems to be ju...
Article
Link: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol46/25/default.htm Background: Many studies have observed that religion plays an important role in determining inequalities in mortality outcomes before the mortality decline in late 19th century Europe. Yet, it is difficult to pinpoint what exactly caused the mortality advantage observed for Je...
Preprint
The complex relationship between the history of infectious diseases and social inequalities has recently attracted renewed attention. Smallpox has so far largely escaped this revived scholarly scrutiny, despite its century-long status as one of the deadliest and widespread of all infectious diseases. Literature has demonstrated that important diffe...
Article
The focus of this article is on how a newly created database on causes of death in Amsterdam (1854–1940) may offer innovative insights by combining it with the available information from the Historical Sample of the Netherlands (HSN). By doing so, it illustrates how future research can help to provide new perspectives on ongoing debates on historic...
Thesis
Full-text available
Although the historical Dutch and Taiwanese populations studied are very different, sibship size and composition influenced the survival of infants and children in both. In general, the presence of siblings led to higher infant and child mortality risks. This is in line with what we know about sibling rivalry and parental investment, which suggest...
Preprint
Link: https://osf.io/preprints/socarxiv/w8g9e/ Little is known about health outcomes after adoption in historical non-Western settings and previous studies have found contradictory results of the influence of adoption on mortality risks. This study investigates if, and how, adoption of infants increased child mortality risks compared to non-adopted...
Book
Full-text available
This edited volume has been compiled to thank and honor Theo Engelen on the occasion of his retirement from the post of full professor of historical demography. Moreover, the book is also a token of the authors’ gratitude for all the efforts made by Engelen as dean and as rector to maintain and improve the reputation of the Radboud University in ge...
Book
Full-text available
Criteria van waarde spelen vanzelfsprekend altijd een rol. Die vanzelfsprekendheid wordt vandaag de dag echter niet tot nauwelijks gezien noch geproblematiseerd. Het is daarom belangrijk om meer aandacht aan bovenstaande vragen te besteden en om dat wat we als vanzelfsprekend achten als vreemd te gaan beschouwen. Om dat juist nu te doen is niet mee...
Chapter
Full-text available
Tijdens mijn master had ik zelf de mogelijkheid om over mijn eigen grenzen als historicus heen te kijken door een essay te schrijven bij het zogenaamde Atelier ‘Sociale theorie en geschiedenis’ van Onno. Destijds was ik van mening dat we als historici door het gebruik van sociale theorie een beter begrip kunnen krijgen van historische leefomstandig...
Book
Full-text available
Dit is een bundel van dankbaarheid, geschreven door collega’s die in allerlei organisaties, commissies en wat dies meer zij met Onno Boonstra hebben samengewerkt. Zij betreuren zijn vertrek uit academia, maar wensen hem een welverdiend otium.
Research Proposal
Full-text available
The proposal for my PhD-project which was honored by the N.W. Posthumus Institute (2013)

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This project, based on cause-of-death data for the city of Amsterdam between 1854-1940, will reveal the successes of the fight against infectious diseases, but also what remained of this burden before the start of the mass vaccination program.
Project
This project focuses on child and youth mortality in Taiwan and the Netherlands, and the influence siblings on mortality outcomes. Moreover, it also investigates if family systems, and regional variations of family systems, play an important role in the observed mortality regimes in Taiwan and the Netherlands.