Tim Rademacher

Tim Rademacher
Université du Québec en Outaouais · Département des sciences naturelles

BA, PhD (cantab)

About

38
Publications
9,109
Reads
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916
Citations
Introduction
I am mostly interested in trees and technology with a focus on developing and building the tools necessary for a predictive ecosystem science. I hope to one day found the Tim Rademacher Ecosystem Eco-physiology lab or TREE lab. Currently, I pursue my research the University of Québec in Outaouais, but am also affiliated with Harvard Forest and Northern Arizona University.
Additional affiliations
November 2017 - present
Northern Arizona University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
November 2017 - present
Northern Arizona University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (38)
Article
Full-text available
Forests are facing climate changes such as warmer temperatures, accelerated snowmelt, increased drought, as well as changing diurnal temperature ranges (DTR) and cloud cover regimes. How tree growth is influenced by the changes in daily to monthly temperatures and its associations with droughts has been extensively investigated, however, few studie...
Article
Whether sources or sinks control wood growth remains debated with a paucity of evidence from mature trees in natural settings. Here, we altered carbon supply rate in stems of mature red maples (Acer rubrum) within the growing season by restricting phloem transport using stem chilling; thereby increasing carbon supply above and decreasing carbon sup...
Article
Full-text available
Wood formation determines major long‐term carbon (C) accumulation in trees and thus provides a crucial ecosystem service in mitigating climate change. Nevertheless, we lack understanding of how species with contrasting wood anatomical types differ with respect to phenology and environmental controls on wood formation. In this study, we investigated...
Article
Full-text available
Agricultural production has replaced natural ecosystems across the planet, becoming a major driver of carbon emissions, biodiversity loss, and freshwater consumption. Here we combined global crop yield and environmental data in a ~1-million-dimensional mathematical optimisation framework to determine how optimising the spatial distribution of globa...
Article
Intra-annual density fluctuations (IADFs) are triggered by environmental cues, but whether they are distributed uniformly throughout the stem is not well documented. The spatial distribution of IADFs could help us understand variations in cambial sensitivity to environmental cues throughout the tree. We investigate how IADF distribution varies radi...
Article
Understanding interspecifc differences in tree water use will aid in the assessment of both tree-level ecophysiological adaptation to climate change and forecasts of forest dynamics. We investigated the seasonal variation of water sources between two co-occurring trees species with contrasting leaf phenology and rooting traits: the deciduous Larix...
Article
Ecological data is collected and shared at an increasingly rapid pace, but it is often shared in inconsistent and untraceable processed forms. Images of wood contain a wealth of information such as colours and textures but are most commonly reduced to ring‐width measurements before they can be shared in various common file formats. Archiving digita...
Article
Full-text available
Mongolian oak is a widely distributed tree species in broadleaf forests of North China, which are susceptible to increasing drought. Expansion of oak species ranges has been reported in Europe, America, and Asia with drought and heat stress, and thus, oak species are often deemed to be drought-resistant. As an expanding species in our study region,...
Article
How variations in carbon supply affect wood formation remains poorly understood in particular in mature forest trees. To elucidate how carbon supply affects carbon allocation and wood formation, we attempted to manipulate carbon supply to the cambial region by phloem girdling and compression during the mid- and late-growing season and measured effe...
Preprint
How variations in carbon supply affect wood formation remains poorly understood in particular in mature forest trees. To elucidate how carbon supply affects carbon allocation and wood formation, we attempted to manipulate carbon supply to the cambial region by phloem girdling and compression during the mid- and late-growing season and measured effe...
Article
Full-text available
Palm oil has been widely criticised for its high environmental impacts, leading to calls to replace it with alternative vegetable oils in food and cosmetic products. However, substituting palm oil would be environmentally beneficial only if the environmental footprint per litre oil were lower than those of alternative vegetable oils. Whether this i...
Article
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Larch trees are widely used in afforestation and timber plantations. Yet, little is known on how planted larch trees cope with increasing drought. We used a tree-ring network of 818 trees from 31 plantations spanning most of the distribution of Larix principis-rupprechtii to investigate how extreme drought influences larch radial growth in northern...
Preprint
Full-text available
Ecological data is collected and shared at an increasingly rapid pace, but it is often shared in inconsistent and untraceable processed forms. Images of wood contain a wealth of information such as colours and textures but are most commonly reduced to ring-width measurements before they can be shared in various common file formats. In fact, no digi...
Article
Full-text available
Changes in the temporal coherence between populations, which can influence their stability, resilience and persistence, remain a critical uncertainty of climate change. Recent studies have documented increasing spatial synchrony between populations at continental scales and linked it to anthropogenic climate change. However, the lack of long-term a...
Preprint
Full-text available
Wood formation is a crucial process for carbon sequestration on land, yet how variations in phloem-transported carbon affect wood formation, respiration and nonstructural carbon pools remains poorly understood. To better understand the role of carbon supply on allocation to wood formation, we constrained phloem transport using girdling and compress...
Article
Full-text available
The length of time that carbon remains in forest biomass is one of the largest uncertainties in the global carbon cycle, with both recent historical baselines and future responses to environmental change poorly constrained by available observations. In the absence of large-scale observations, models used for global assessments tend to fall back on...
Preprint
Full-text available
The destruction of ecosystems for vegetable oil production represents a major cause of global biodiversity loss and greenhouse gas emissions. Over the last two decades, oil palm, in particular, has caused societal concern due to its high impacts on biodiverse and carbon-dense tropical rainforests, leading to calls to source vegetable oils from alte...
Preprint
Full-text available
Abstract. The length of time that carbon remains in forest biomass is one of the largest uncertainties in the global carbon cycle, with both recent-historical baselines and future responses to environmental change poorly constrained by available observations. In the absence of large-scale observations, models tend to fall back on simplified assumpt...
Article
Full-text available
Manual chamber-based measurements of CO 2 (and H 2 O) fluxes are important for understanding ecosystem carbon metabolism. Small opaque chambers can be used to measure leaf, stem and soil respiration. Larger transparent chambers can be used to measure net ecosystem exchange of CO 2 , and small jars often serve this purpose for laboratory incubations...
Chapter
Stem compression reduces or terminates the phloem-mediated transport of carbohydrates and other solutes in tree stems, without causing permanent damage to phloem functioning (Henriksson et al. Tree Physiol. 35:1075–1085, 2015). This has been tested on two species of pine trees, with diameters ranging from 3 to 26 cm in a forest in northern Sweden (...
Article
Full-text available
• Key message Dynamic global vegetation models are key tools for interpreting and forecasting the responses of terrestrial ecosystems to climatic variation and other drivers. They estimate plant growth as the outcome of the supply of carbon through photosynthesis. However, growth is itself under direct control, and not simply controlled by the amou...
Article
Full-text available
Carbon dynamics within trees are intrinsically important for physiological functioning, in particular growth and survival, as well as ecological interactions on multiple timescales. Thus, these internal dynamics play a key role in the global carbon cycle by determining the residence time of carbon in forests via allocation to different tissues and...
Preprint
Full-text available
Agriculture is the main driver of global biodiversity loss, accounts for about one third of greenhouse gas emissions, and is responsible for 70% of freshwater use. How can land be used for agriculture in a way that minimises the impact on the world's natural resources while maintaining current production levels? We solved this more than 10 million...
Article
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In 2008, a group of conservation scientists compiled a list of 100 priority questions for the conservation of the world's biodiversity [Sutherland et al. (2009) Conservation Biology, 23, 557–567]. However, now almost a decade later, no one has yet published a study gauging how much progress has been made in addressing these 100 high‐priority questi...
Article
Full-text available
Turnover concepts in state-of-the-art global vegetation models (GVMs) account for various processes, but are often highly simplified and may not include an adequate representation of the dominant processes that shape vegetation carbon turnover rates in real forest ecosystems at a large spatial scale. Here, we evaluate vegetation carbon turnover pro...
Article
Turnover concepts in state-of-the-art global vegetation models (GVMs) account for various processes, but are often highly simplified and may not include an adequate representation of the dominant processes that shape vegetation carbon turnover rates in real forest ecosystems at a large spatial scale. Here, we evaluate vegetation carbon turnover pro...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing CO2 concentrations are strongly controlled by the behavior of established forests, which are believed to be a major current sink of atmospheric CO2. There are many models which predict forest responses to environmental changes but they are almost exclusively carbon source (i.e., photosynthesis) driven. Here we present a model for an indi...
Article
Increasing CO2 concentrations are strongly controlled by the behavior of established forests, which are believed to be a major current sink of atmospheric CO2. There are many models which predict forest responses to environmental changes but they are almost exclusively carbon source (i.e., photosynthesis) driven. Here we present a model for an indi...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing CO 2 concentrations are strongly controlled by the behaviour of undisturbed forests, which are believed to be a major current sink of atmospheric CO 2 . There are many models which predict forest responses to environmental changes but they are almost exclusively carbon source (i.e. photosynthesis) driven. Here we present a model for an i...
Article
Full-text available
Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the largest carbon pool in terrestrial ecosystems and may play a key role in biospheric feedbacks with elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) in a warmer future world. We examined the simulation results of seven terrestrial biome models when forced with climate projections from four representative-concentration-pathw...
Article
Full-text available
Future climate change and increasing atmospheric CO2 are expected to cause major changes in vegetation structure and function over large fractions of the global land surface. Seven global vegetation models are used to analyze possible responses to future climate simulated by a range of general circulation models run under all four representative co...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change may pose a high risk of change to Earth’s ecosystems: shifting climatic boundaries may induce changes in the biogeochemical functioning and structures of ecosystems that render it difficult for endemic plant and animal species to survive in their current habitats. Here we aggregate changes in the biogeochemical ecosystem state as a p...
Article
Full-text available
Dramatic ecosystem shifts, relating to vegetation composition and water and carbon stocks and fluxes, are potential consequences of climate change in the twenty-first century. Shifting climatic conditions, resulting in changes in biogeochemical properties of the ecosystem, will render it difficult for endemic plant and animal species to continue to...

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