Tim Mazzarol

Tim Mazzarol
University of Western Australia | UWA · UWA Business School

B.Arts (Hons), B.Ed., MBA (Distinction), PHD

About

270
Publications
246,999
Reads
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Citations
Introduction
Tim Mazzarol is a Winthrop Professor in Entrepreneurship, Innovation, Marketing and Strategy at the University of Western Australia and an affiliate Professor with the Burgundy School of Business, Groupe ESC Dijon, Bourgogne, France. His research into has been published internationally. He holds a PhD in Management and an MBA with distinction from Curtin University of Technology, and a Bachelor of Arts with Honours from Murdoch University, Western Australia.
Additional affiliations
January 2011 - present
University of Western Australia
Position
  • Enhancing Sustainable Energy Saving Behaviour Through Communication – A Longitudinal Study
Description
  • Australian Research Council (ARC) funded Linkage project in conjunction with the WA Government Office of Energy, Synergy and Pure Profile. The project examines the application of an online community to substantially reduce household energy consumption.
July 2010 - present
University of Western Australia
Position
  • Sustainable Cooperative Enterprise – An Investigation into the Factors Influencing the Sustainability & Competitiveness of Cooperative Enterprises
Description
  • This is an Australian Research Council (ARC) funded Linkage project in conjunction with Cooperatives WA, CBH Group Ltd, Capricorn Society and Ravensdown. It examines the sustainability of the cooperative enterprise business model.
January 1996 - December 1999
Curtin University Australia
Education
January 1994 - December 1997
Curtin University
Field of study
  • Management & Marketing
January 1990 - December 1991
Curtin University
Field of study
  • Management
January 1979 - December 1980
Murdoch University
Field of study
  • Education

Publications

Publications (270)
Article
Full-text available
What makes the cooperative business model unique is the various roles members have. We interviewed executives and members of four large Australian cooperatives to determine what these roles were. Our results show differences in terminologies and a conflation of member roles relating to patronage, ownership, investment, and community membership. We...
Article
The purpose of this study was to examine the relative importance of customer engagement (CE) on customer loyalty (CL) and word of mouth (WOM) within co-operative and mutual enterprises (CMEs), and to see how these relationships compared to those found in more mainstream investor-owned businesses (IOFs). A large sample (n = 856) of CME members and I...
Article
Full-text available
Global demand for energy, environmental concerns over power generation emissions, and rising household energy costs have heightened interest in exploring ways to reduce energy consumption. Numerous approaches have been adopted, including those that build on the important recognition of consumer intentions as a predictor of behavior. However, the li...
Article
This paper investigates aspects of cruising of most concern to Australian consumers during the COVID-19 pandemic, following the shutdown of cruising globally. Using a mixed-method approach, the study asked cruisers and non-cruisers which of the risks associated with cruising were of most concern. The study found health was the most concerning risk...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic devastated the cruise sector with an initial global shutdown and ongoing patchy resumption, widespread reporting of virus transmission onboard and billions of dollars in economic losses. This study explores how COVID-19 has impacted Australian and UK consumers’ risk perceptions, revealing cruises are no longer considered “safe...
Article
This paper examines the perspectives of employers and employees within nano, micro, small, medium, and large firms in relation to HRM practices. The study draws upon a large sample of respondents from firms of all size categories. An online questionnaire comprising established HRM measures was used to collect the data. A multivariate discriminant a...
Preprint
This paper investigates aspects of cruising of most concern to Australian consumers during the COVID-19 pandemic, following the shutdown of cruising globally and the Ruby Princess debacle. Using Best-Worst Scaling methodology, the study asked cruisers and non-cruisers which of the risks associated with cruising were of most concern. The study found...
Article
Full-text available
The global coronavirus pandemic has devastated the cruise sector with widespread disruption and cancellations affecting millions of cruise passengers. The cruise industry was negatively affected due to the enclavic and confined environment onboard, the high infection rates among both crew and passengers, and widespread negative media coverage. This...
Article
Small to Medium Enterprises (SMEs) can benefit from membership of a cooperative. This study aims to test previous antecedents of why SMEs join a cooperative. We interviewed members and executives of four Australian cooperatives to investigate reasons why SME owners joined them. All interviewees agreed that the cooperative had to provide economic be...
Article
How can an entrepreneurial education program simultaneously create entrepreneurial knowledge, skills and competencies, as well as new ventures and jobs? This is a particular challenge for universities that are keen to align with government policies and demonstrate impact. Our paper examines a novel approach to enterprise and entrepreneurship educat...
Chapter
This Chapter examines the case of Skin Elements Ltd., a Biotech start-up enterprise that successfully created, manufactured and commercialised an innovative skincare technology into a global market. The principal focus of this case study is on the role played by knowledge management and how this shaped the innovation strategy that saw the technolog...
Chapter
Franchising has become a highly popular business system throughout the world with many small business owner-managers joining franchise networks. Although the more famous franchise systems such as KFC, McDonalds and Pizza Hut that came to Australia in the 1970s were established in the US there are now many such as Snap Printing, Jim’s Mowing and Eag...
Chapter
Operations management is crucial to the success of any small business. It impacts both the firm’s financial and non-financial aspects. Of importance is the control that can be obtained over the firm’s cash flow, stock and other productive assets to achieve the maximum levels of operational efficiency and effectiveness. Each business is likely to be...
Chapter
This chapter examines the issue of valuation and the related issues of purchasing and selling a small firm. It highlights the fact that valuation is not a precise science, and there is no established formula for determining how much a business should be worth. It also considers consolidation and harvesting of the wealth from the business. The proce...
Chapter
Small business owner-managers have been found to have a less sophisticated approach to formal business planning than their counterparts in larger firms. This is generally related to a lower level of systematic data gathering or a low level of statistical analysis. However, owner-managers are strategically aware and realise the consequences of their...
Chapter
While many small businesses start up with only bootstrap financing, it is usually necessary for them to expand their operations and invest in both new capital equipment, employees and marketing or advertising activities. The expansion – even modest expansion – of a small firm can place a strain on the firm’s resources and it is possible for a small...
Chapter
The classification of firms into micro, small, medium and large is undertaken primarily on the size of their payroll. As the business expands in size the role of the owner-manager becomes more complex and leadership more important. The owner-manager’s ability to develop his or her staff into a team who can operate systems efficiently and effectivel...
Chapter
Financing a small business venture requires the owner-manager to determine the amount of capital that will be required to achieve the level of activity and growth within the business over its early years. How large this amount of capital is will depend on the nature of the business, its industry dynamics and the ambitions or goals set for it by the...
Chapter
This chapter examines the challenges facing small firms in their early years, and examines how best to screen new venture opportunities. The foundation of a small business is usually a personal decision by the owner-manager or managers who have decided to undertake the challenge and assume the risks associated with launching a new venture. A major...
Chapter
Technology offers small business owners an opportunity to enhance the productivity of their firm, widen its marketing reach and significantly improve the level of control they have over information and communications within the company. The use of technology, particularly information communications technologies (ICT) by small businesses has grown s...
Chapter
Crisis management, turnaround strategies and reengineering are just as important to the small business owner-manager as they are to the managers of large corporations. Unlike their large business counterparts, the small business owner-manager is likely to experience not only loss of profits and shareholder value if things don’t go well, but may los...
Chapter
This chapter examines the role of small business within the economy as well as government policy toward the small business sector. It provides an overview of the small business sector while considering the specific nature of management within a small firm and the policy responses available to governments. Small businesses typically make up the majo...
Chapter
Small business growth is a goal that would seem desirable for all owner-managers. However, relatively few small business start-ups develop into large firms (e.g. with over 250 employees) (OECD, 2002, 2010). Many disappear along the way, either due to external factors beyond the control of the owner-manager, or more commonly due to internal factors...
Chapter
Large corporations have substantial resources to devote to marketing, and frequently have many levels of marketing management with responsibilities for national and regional operations, or different product lines (Webster, 1992). A feature of the large corporation is its use of formal planning processes to guide its marketing activities (McColl-Ken...
Chapter
This chapter examines the differences between small business owner-managers and entrepreneurs. It also looks at the different types of small firms and at the small business start-up process. Entrepreneurship and small business management are not the same event. In this chapter these distinctions will be explored further. In addition, the new ventur...
Chapter
This chapter examines theories of the adoption and diffusion of innovation. It explores the issue of whether innovation diffusion is a social or economic process, and the importance of initial customer selection. Also discussed are the need to identify clear pathways to market, the barriers to market entry, and substitution threats. The need for th...
Chapter
This chapter examines the relationship between the entrepreneur’s vision and the need for strategic planning. It recognises that flexibility is critical in the development of entrepreneurial ventures and that the planning process must be non-linear in nature if it is to be responsive to the opportunities that market or product innovation offer. Whi...
Chapter
This chapter examines the role of innovation as a key economic driver and the nature of radical or disruptive innovations as a major source of new technological products and processes. It examines the theory and practice of strategic management of innovation, and the generation of innovation value through the adoption of a Blue Ocean strategy. The...
Chapter
This chapter examines some of the psychological and social trait theories of entrepreneurship as well as environmental factors likely to trigger enterprising behaviour. Also examined are the roles of creativity and achievement drive, plus concepts for evaluating individual entrepreneurial traits. The chapter also overviews the concept of entreprene...
Chapter
Commercialisation has been described as the process of preparing and taking an established product, process or service to market (DITR 2003). The process ends when the product, process or service is finally marketed successfully to the customer. It is typically the costliest part of the innovation process, requires the most entrepreneurial effort a...
Chapter
This chapter examines the nature of corporate structure and governance for high-growth firms as well as the process of team building both in early stage and in more mature ventures. The importance of getting the right team and the need to ensure that the team is balanced and effective are also considered. It also examines some of the issues associa...
Chapter
This chapter examines: new venture creation in established organisations, the intrapreneurial process, the middle manager as an entrepreneur, the roles of sponsors, and climate makers. The infusion of entrepreneurial thinking into large corporate organisational structures has emerged as a key area of management attention since the 1990s. As levels...
Chapter
This chapter examines the financing options available to entrepreneurs from initial start-up through growth and expansion. It examines the key sources of finance with attention to debt, equity and retained profit. While much of the popular focus of entrepreneurial financing has been placed on venture capital, this is only one of many options availa...
Chapter
This chapter examines the small business sector and the differences that exist between entrepreneurs and small business owner-managers. The “myth” of small business innovation and the entrepreneurial growth cycle of small firms are also explored along with the need for small firms to establish collaborative support networks. The importance of small...
Chapter
This chapter examines the social and economic process underpinning entrepreneurship activity and the impacts of entrepreneurial activity on global, national and local economies. In particular, it focuses on defining key concepts such as enterprise, entrepreneurship, entrepreneurs and innovation. Entrepreneurship and innovation are now recognised as...
Chapter
This chapter examines the process of screening opportunities for new product development (NPD), and the importance of undertaking detailed market assessments of the customers’ needs and wants. It discusses the use of a range techniques and associated concepts including voice of customer, quality function deployment (QFD), Kano analysis, CAGE modell...
Chapter
This chapter examines creativity and its links to enterprise. This includes the three-stage process of entrepreneurship: opportunity screening; acquiring resources and building capability. Within this examination, the chapter reviews innovation and competitive advantage, financing ventures, team building and entrepreneurial growth. The process of e...
Chapter
This chapter examines the issue of how to manage risk in the process of innovation. By its very nature, innovation is inherently risky. The more radical and disruptive the innovation, the more uncertainty and potential risk is created. However, the management of risk remains an important issue for any manager or organisation seeking to engage in th...
Chapter
This chapter provides an overview of the emerging field of social entrepreneurship and innovation, with a specific focus on co-operative enterprise as a distinct business model. While entrepreneurship has been viewed as a process of self-directed, individualistic and profit maximising opportunism, the reality is that many entrepreneurs and innovato...
Chapter
This chapter examines the process of screening opportunities for new product development (NPD), and the importance of undertaking detailed market assessments of the customers’ needs and wants. It discusses the use of a range techniques and associated concepts including voice of customer, quality function deployment (QFD), Kano analysis, CAGE modell...
Chapter
This chapter has provided an overview of the nature of IP and how it is protected and valued. A key issue in successful commercialisation of innovation is the identification, ownership and protection of creative output and proprietary knowledge. IP can be formally registered (e.g. patents, trademarks) or automatically assigned upon creation (e.g. c...
Chapter
This chapter has provided an overview of the financing process for entrepreneurial firms. For these types of businesses, there is likely to be an equity finance gap due to a lack of available risk capital. Sources of financing can include banks, financing firms, insurance companies and trade creditors that provide debt financing against either tang...
Chapter
This chapter has provided an overview of the concepts of social entrepreneurship and innovation. It has highlighted the fact that social entrepreneurs use the same skills and behaviours of traditional entrepreneurs, but for a social rather than an economic purpose. The social entrepreneur can be found in a wide range of environments that can includ...
Chapter
This chapter examines the issue of how to manage risk in the process of innovation. By its very nature, innovation is inherently risky. The more radical and disruptive the innovation, the more uncertainty and potential risk is created. However, the management of risk remains an important issue for any manager or organisation seeking to engage in th...
Chapter
This chapter has examined the entrepreneurial process which is comprised of three distinct stages: (i) opportunity recognition, (ii) marshalling resources, and (iii) developing capability. The screening of opportunities is a key part of the entrepreneurial process, and the reason why some people identify opportunities better than others may be due...
Chapter
Planning should not be confused with clarity of vision. This chapter examines the relationship between an entrepreneur’s vision and the need to generate a formal business plan. It suggests that a formal business plan is no guarantee for success and that, while planning is important, too much attention can be paid to business plans at the expense of...
Chapter
This chapter has examined the nature of entrepreneurship and innovation, providing definitions for both and placing them into context. Note that entrepreneurship is a major driver of employment and economic growth throughout the world. Entrepreneurship operates at the individual, organisational and environmental level, and is a process associated w...
Chapter
This chapter provides an overview of some of the elements associated with team building and leadership with entrepreneurial companies. The importance of assembling a well-balanced management team with a complimentary range of skills is highlighted. This management team should be supported by a competent management board made up of individuals who c...
Chapter
This chapter examines the process of adoption and diffusion of innovation. It suggests that innovation is driven by three paradigms, focusing respectively on: the individual creative genius, the technology-push of systematic scientific inquiry, and market-pull. While the creation of innovative new ideas and technologies is an important goal for bus...
Chapter
This chapter provides an overview of the concept of intrapreneurship or internal corporate venturing which suggests that managers within large organisations can behave like entrepreneurs. The ability of large organisations to generate innovations is contingent on their ability to encourage entrepreneurial behaviour among their employees. Intraprene...
Chapter
This chapter provides an overview of the characteristics that influence the entrepreneur and shape their behaviour. The factors influencing entrepreneurship are found both internally and externally to the individual, comprising a combination of personality traits and environmental influences. Entrepreneurs are typically characterised by strong achi...
Chapter
This chapter examines the role of innovation as a key economic driver and the nature of radical or disruptive innovations as a major source of new technological products and processes. It examines the theory and practice of strategic management of innovation, and the generation of innovation value through the adoption of a Blue Ocean strategy. Tech...
Chapter
This chapter has provided an overview of the small business sector and the nature of small business management. Small firms are a major source of employment and economic growth throughout the world and provide a management environment that is very different from that found in large organisations. A problem in understanding the small business sector...
Chapter
Small business owner-managers need to learn how to screen business opportunities and adopt a more strategic mindset. Most tend to be more reactive and short range in their thinking. A lack of adequate market analysis and a reliance on guess work and intuition are common problems. Common causes of failure in small businesses are a lack of capital, p...
Chapter
The process of small business management needs to be understood within the context of the overall enterprise environment that consists of micro, small and medium-sized firms, within the entrepreneurial culture from which they are formed, and within the support networks that allow them to get started. Enterprise, entrepreneurship and small business...
Chapter
While many small businesses start up with only bootstrap financing, it is usually necessary for them to expand their operations and invest in both new capital equipment, employees and marketing or advertising activities. The expansion – even modest expansion – of a small firm can place a strain on the firm’s resources and it is possible for a small...
Chapter
Small business owner-managers are not generally engaged in formal business planning. However, they can derive benefits from strategic planning. The development of a clear vision for their business is an important step in successful strategic management. Formal written business plans are often prepared by small firms to secure financing from banks o...
Book
This textbook familiarises students with the theory and practice of small business management and challenges assumptions that may be held about the way small business management can or should adopt the management practices of larger firms. For students interested in establishing and managing their own small firm, this book helps them to focus thei...
Book
This book provides an overview of the theory, practice and context of entrepreneurship and innovation at both the industry and firm level. It provides a foundation of ideas and understandings designed to shape the reader’s thinking and behaviour to better appreciate the role of innovation and entrepreneurship in modern economies, and to recognise t...
Book
This book provides an overview of the theory, practice and context of entrepreneurship and innovation at both the industry and firm level. It provides a foundation of ideas and understandings designed to shape the reader’s thinking and behaviour to better appreciate the role of innovation and entrepreneurship in modern economies, and to recognise t...
Book
This workbook accompanies the textbook Small Business Management: Theory and Practice. The textbook familiarises students with the theory and practice of small business management and challenges assumptions that may be held about the way small business management can or should adopt the management practices of larger firms. For students interested...
Chapter
This chapter examines the issue of valuation and the related issues of purchasing and selling a small firm. It highlights the fact that valuation is not a precise science, and there is no established formula for determining how much a business should be worth. It also considers consolidation and harvesting of the wealth from the business.
Chapter
The classification of firms into micro, small, medium and large is undertaken primarily on the size of their payroll. As the business expands in size the role of the owner-manager becomes more complex and leadership more important. The owner-manager’s ability to develop his or her staff into a team who can operate systems efficiently and effectivel...
Chapter
Marketing within the small business is not the same as found within larger organisations due to limited resources, but also the owner-manager’s ability to get closer to the customer and understand their needs and wants. The term “customerising” has been coined to describe the process of marketing within the small business. This involves the ability...
Chapter
Crisis management, turnaround strategies and reengineering are just as important to the small business owner-manager as they are to the managers of large corporations. Unlike their large business counterparts, the small business owner-manager is likely to experience not only loss of profits and shareholder value if things don’t go well, but may los...
Chapter
Growth is only one option available to small business owner-managers and one that most do not chose to follow. Most small business owners are content to manage their firms primarily for lifestyle rather than growth. If the owner-manager decides to pursue growth they must learn how to manage ever increasing scale and scope, putting in place systems...
Chapter
Operations management is crucial to the success of any small business. It impacts both the firm’s financial and non-financial aspects. Of importance is the control that can be obtained over the firm’s cash flow, stock and other productive assets to achieve the maximum levels of operational efficiency and effectiveness. Each business is likely to be...
Chapter
Financing a small business venture requires the owner-manager to determine the amount of capital that will be required to achieve the level of activity and growth within the business over its early years. How large this amount of capital is will depend on the nature of the business, its industry dynamics and the ambitions or goals set for it by the...
Chapter
Technology offers small business owners an opportunity to enhance the productivity of their firm, widen its marketing reach and significantly improve the level of control they have over information and communications within the company. The use of technology, particularly information communications technologies (ICT) by small businesses has grown s...
Chapter
Franchising has become one of the most successful forms of business model in recent years with business format franchising systems spreading rapidly throughout the world. Franchising offers the advantages of a proven business system, training and management support, and ongoing marketing. In this sense it is often viewed as being less risky than st...
Chapter
Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) comprise the majority of firms in most economies, and are predominately micro-enterprises with typically only one employee – the owner-manager. They contribute a substantial proportion of the workforce and have been viewed by many governments as a key source of new jobs. However, the majority of SMEs are no...
Article
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present findings from a large-scale survey of members of co-operative and mutual enterprises (CMEs) that examines the factors influencing members’ intentions to remain loyal to the enterprise and to provide word of mouth (WOM). Design/methodology/approach A model was suggested and tested to examine the int...
Article
If you would like to write for this, or any other Emerald publication, then please use our Emerald for Authors service information about how to choose which publication to write for and submission guidelines are available for all. Please visit www.emeraldinsight.com/authors for more information. About Emerald www.emeraldinsight.com Emerald is a glo...
Article
Full-text available
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report presents the results of a multi-phase project initially commissioned by the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (ACCI) titled ‘Working for Our Future: Modernising Workplace Relations in Australia’ with funding from the federal Department of Employment. These results have been expanded to draw in, where ever pos...
Article
Full-text available
The co-operative and mutual enterprise business model represents a unique type of organisation that has a dual purpose focused on both economic and social goals. For nearly two centuries it has played an important role in economic development, job creation and addressing market failures. However, despite its potential importance to economic develop...
Article
Résumé Nous développons une taxonomie des entreprises de petite taille (TPE/PME) permettant de mieux les classifier et de mieux les comprendre, afin de mieux en soutenir le développement. Pour cela, nous mobilisons une base de données de grande ampleur construite pour la région Rhône-Alpes. Cette étude est motivée par l’énorme diversité des PME, et...
Research
Full-text available
This report was produced by Tui McKeown and Tim Mazzarol of the Small Enterprise Association of Australia and New Zealand (SEAANZ) under commission from the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry. This research was supported by the Department of Jobs and Small Business via the Productivity and Education Training Fund.
Technical Report
Full-text available
While Australia’s Work Health and Safety (WHS) legislation began with individual state and territory nuanced systems, the common underlying premise has always been that work health and safety must be a three-way (tripartite) system involving regulators, employers and workers. This blend of employer and employee obligations and entitlements acting a...
Article
Co-operative and mutual enterprises (CMEs) are organisations in which buyers or suppliers are also the owners, shareholders and members of a community of purpose. Member heterogeneity and commitment have been reported in the literature, but the drivers of member commitment remain poorly understood. This paper proposes that members identify with the...
Article
The study investigates the relationship between organisational factors and the anticipated returns to the commercialisation of an innovation within small to medium enterprises (SMEs). Using a large multi-country sample, the analysis involved a structural equation model of seven organisational factors associated with the management of innovation, an...
Chapter
In this chapter, a longitudinal case study is examined of Scanalyse, a technology spin-out company from an Australian university that grew from start-up to a global market position within a decade and was then sold through trade sale to one of its main competitors. The case provides an example of how a small innovative firm assesses the value of th...
Article
The paper outlines the evolution of small business policy in Australia and New Zealand. Adopting an historical perspective, changes in policies and programs from the 1970s to the present for these two nations are discussed and compared. Starting with an overview of the nature of small business policy and its emergence internationally, the distincti...