Tim Haesebrouck

Tim Haesebrouck
Ghent University | UGhent · Department of Political Sciences

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46
Publications
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363
Citations

Publications

Publications (46)
Article
Full-text available
This study aims to explain the pattern of contributions to NATO’s military campaign in Libya. It combines collective action theory with hypotheses on balance of threat, alliance politics, and domestic constraints in a multicausal framework, which is tested with qualitative comparative analysis. The results suggest novel inferences on the interactio...
Article
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Although over sixty partners have joined the US-led coalition against the Islamic State (IS), only a handful of states was willing to carry out air strikes against IS-targets. This article aims to explain the pattern of democratic participation in the air campaign. It builds on the rich literature on military burden sharing and democratic peace the...
Article
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At the 2014 Wales Summit, the NATO allies pledged to spend at least 2% of their GDP on defence by 2024. While some allies are on track to meet the 2% target, others only modestly augmented their military expenditures and still others have even reduced their defence budgets. This article aims to explain the diverging trajectories of the allies’ mili...
Article
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Does public opinion act as a constraint on military action, are ordinary citizens the easily manipulated targets of the public relations efforts of their governments, or does the general public react as assertively to threats as decisionmakers? This article examines the causal connection between military action, public opinion and threats. Empirica...
Article
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The field of Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) is witnessing a heated debate on which one of QCA’s main solution types should be at the centre of substantive interpretation. This article argues that the different QCA solutions have complementary strengths. Therefore, researchers should interpret the three solution types in an integrated way, i...
Article
While a comprehensive body of research provides evidence that politics does not always stop at the water’s edge, the question “when does politics stop at the water’s edge” has remained largely unanswered. This article addresses this gap in the literature by examining the level of agreement in Belgium’s parliament on military deployment decisions. M...
Book
“This book is a must-read for everyone interested in the foreign policies of European countries in the three decades since the end of the Cold War.” —Wolfgang Wagner, Professor of International Security, Department of Political Science and Public Administration at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands “Foreign Policy Change in Europe...
Chapter
The foreign policies of countries are often considered as a function of their (military and economic) power, their interests, or their ‘role’ on the international scene. These are generally considered as fairly stable. Yet, in the past decades, we have witnessed a striking number of countries enacting important changes to their foreign policy. This...
Chapter
This chapter reviews the constants and changes in Belgian foreign policy since the end of the Cold War. The chapter identifies 6 particular instances of change across different policy issues of foreign policy and zoom in on the dynamics that contributed to these changes, at the international, domestic and individual level. It is clear that Belgium’...
Article
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This special issue addresses questions of causality and validity of different solution types in configurational comparative methods (CCMs). First, what main parameters characterize the debate about correct causal interpretation of solution types? Second, to what extent has this debate been linked to a theory of causation? The special issue contribu...
Article
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Belgium traditionally presents itself as a strong supporter of multilateral security cooperation and aims to be a reliable partner in the EU and NATO. Nevertheless, the uninterrupted decline of Belgium’s defence budget paints a different picture, that of a country that rides cheap on the defence efforts of its partners. Belgium does make equitable...
Article
Over the past few years, the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline has been one of the most divisive issues in EU politics, with some member states opposing the project, others supporting it, and a third group adopting a neutral stance. Which conditions explain these varying national positions? Our study offers the first systematic attempt to examine preferen...
Article
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Recent studies on political ideology suggest the existence of partisan divides on matters of foreign and security policy – challenging the notion that “politics stops at the water’s edge”. However, when taken as a whole, extant work provides decidedly mixed evidence of party-political differences outside domestic politics. This article first conduc...
Article
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Both the natural and the social sciences are currently facing a deep “reproducibility crisis”. Two important factors in this crisis have been the selective reporting of results and methodological problems. In this article, we examine a fusion of these two factors. More specifically, we demonstrate that the uncritical import of Boolean optimization...
Article
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Over the last decades, an increasing number of empirical studies have examined foreign policy change. In this article, we provide an overview of different conceptualizations and understandings of foreign policy change, identify the different drivers and inhibitors of change, and suggest avenues for future research. Most importantly, this review arg...
Article
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Why do some military deployment decisions lead to high levels of political contestation, whereas others do not? Or, put differently, when does parliamentary consensus on the use of force abroad exist? In this article, we aim to answer this question by focusing on the varying levels of consensus in national parliaments when taking military deploymen...
Preprint
Full-text available
Recent studies on political ideology suggest the existence of partisan divides on matters of foreign and security policy-challenging the notion that "politics stops at the water's edge". However, when taken as a whole, extant work provides decidedly mixed evidence of party-political differences outside domestic politics. This article first conducts...
Article
Full-text available
In a recent contribution to Quality and Quantity, Carsten Schneider (Qual Quant 1–18, 2018b) presents an updated version of the two-step QCA approach. Although Schneider (2018b) raises a lot of relevant issues, his revised procedure has three important disadvantages. First of all, the procedure sets the bar higher for remote conditions to be consid...
Article
In 2017, the UK and Canada launched the ‘Powering Past Coal Alliance’ (PPCA), a coalition of governments, organisations and businesses seeking to establish a phase-out of coal for electricity generation by 2050 at the latest. Yet, most of the countries that have signed the charter do not burn coal in large quantities. Some do not even burn coal at...
Article
This article addresses the degree of parliamentary involvement in decisions to deploy armed forces abroad. It observes how the recourse to force by the US-led military coalition fighting against the so-called Islamic State (IS, also known as ISIL, or Da’esh) in Iraq and Syria seems to fit into a broader trend of increased parliamentary control over...
Article
In 2017, the UK and Canada launched the ‘Powering Past Coal Alliance’ (PPCA), a coalition of governments, organisations and businesses seeking to establish a phase-out of coal for electricity generation by 2050 at the latest. Yet, most of the countries that have signed the charter do not burn coal in large quantities. Some do not even burn coal at...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the impact of parliamentary involvement in troop deployment decisions on restrictions on military mandates by examining the Belgian contribution to the 2011 Libya intervention and the coalition against the self-proclaimed Islamic State. More specifically, we analyse (1) the effect of party ideology on mandate preferences, and...
Article
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Contrary to what the EU’s image as a civilian power suggests, the EU member states have had 50,000–100,000 troops deployed outside their home countries for most of the post-Cold-War period. Although the vast majority of these troops were active in operations with a strong European presence, the member states’ patterns of military engagement differ...
Article
Military burden sharing has been a subject of repeated debates in NATO and the UN. Despite more modest goals, the European Union’s (EU) Common Security and Defense Policy (CSDP) has experienced no fewer difficulties in garnering men, money, and materiel. While this may not come as a surprise, the fact that some EU member states have carried disprop...
Article
European countries have developed strikingly different responses to shale gas and fracking. Some have imposed outright bans, while others have issued permits and even awarded generous tax breaks to the industry. To explain this puzzling variance, this article builds a theoretical framework that focuses on energy security, economic competitiveness,...
Article
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An increasing number of studies examines the security and defence policies of the EU and its member states from a strategic culture perspective. This scholarship has been predominately occupied with examining whether the EU is developing its own strategic culture, mapping the differences between the strategic cultures of the member states and asses...
Article
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What accounts for the diverging contributions to multinational military operations? Over two decades ago, Bennett, Lepgold and Unger published a seminal study that aimed to explain the division of the burdens of the Desert Storm Coalition. This article reviews four recent monographs on national behaviour in multinational operations against the back...
Article
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This article aims to qualify the skeptical view of many leading methodologists on multi-value Qualitative Comparative Analysis (mvQCA). More specifically, it draws attention to a distinctive strength of this QCA-variant. In contrast to the other QCA-variants, mvQCA is capable of straightforwardly capturing the specific causal role of every category...
Article
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The EU's Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) has mainly been used to deploy small-scale operations, which generally did not provide the member states with clear security benefits. This article combines insights from different theories of international relations to explain this disappointing track record. It argues that liberal theories adequa...
Article
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Between 2008 and 2013, both the number and scale of operations deployed through the Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) shrank significantly. This loss of appetite for EU-led operations not only contrasted starkly with the gluttony displayed during the preceding five years, but also with the Member States' willingness to keep launching operat...
Article
In a recent International Politics article, Henrik Friberg-Fernros and Douglas Brommesson argue that the responsibility to protect (R2P) doctrine, as it was originally introduced in the International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty (ICISS) report, is incoherent. More specifically, they contend that there is a fundamental conflict b...
Chapter
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Article
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What explains democratic participation in United Nations peacekeeping operations? Although the division of the burden of UN peacekeeping operations has attracted a considerable amount of scholarly attention, neither the impact of domestic variables, nor the interaction between the domestic and international determinants of peacekeeping contribution...
Article
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Beslissingen in de VN-Veiligheidsraad worden niet alleen genomen op basis van de ernst van de crisis, maar ook en vooral op basis van de belangen van de permanente leden en hun onderlinge machtsverhoudingen. Hierdoor gaat de Raad selectief te werk. Maar een alternatief is er niet. De paradox is dat de Raad zowel ineffectief als onmisbaar is.

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (5)
Project
We are pleased to introduce a new initiative by the Ghent Insitute for International and European Studies (GIES): the GIES Occasional Papers. Taken aback at the shocking acts of aggression by the Russian authorities in Ukraine, our research group aimed to look inwards and build on our expertise to shine a light on the crisis. Starting today, we will publish contributions by our researchers on a daily basis.
Project
There is an ongoing controversy on the correctness of QCA’s different solution types (conservative, (enhanced) intermediate and (enhanced) parsimonious) and on which of these solutions should be at the basis of substantive interpretation. The special issue seeks to advance these discussions through a structured, respectful, clarifying discussion focused on the following, or similar, substantive questions: 1. What are the analytic goals of applying CCMs? 2. What theory or theories and definitions of causation underlie QCA in its explanatory uses? 3. What is the purpose and usefulness of logical minimization, depending on QCA’s analytic goals? 4. How can we think of and evaluate the correctness of CCM results? 5. Which solution types are best suited (or not suited) for different purposes? 6. What are the background assumptions that must be made for different CCM solution types/ analytic purposes? 7. How generalizable are the conclusions that can be drawn from different solution types? By treating these questions, the special issue has two overarching goals. First of all, it aims to map the different views on the solution types, the different ways in which these are interpreted and the required background assumptions for drawing conclusions from the different solution types. Second, and more generally, it aims to result in a better understanding of the different purposes for which CCMs can be used and which solution types fits best with what purpose. Hereby, it aims to result in a set of guidelines on which solution type CCM applicants can use for the purpose of their research. We invite contributions from a diversity of scholarship, perspectives, and disciplinary or epistemological approaches that move forward the state of the art in a constructive manner. Submission guidelines: -Deadline for sending abstracts to guest editors via e-mail: March 1, 2020 (Tim.Haesebrouck@ugent.be and e.thomann@exeter.ac.uk) -Closing date (submission of full papers via editorial manager): July 30, 2020 Abstracts should specify, in no more than 250 words: - Research question and relevance motivating the paper - Data/methods used - Main argument/ findings and implications in light of the special issue topic More information: https://www.springer.com/journal/11135/updates/17622352
Project
Foreign policy (making) has changed dramatically since the end of the Cold War. While a number of evolutions, like European integration and enlargement, have affected a large number of countries in a very similar way, there have also been a number of very country-specific evolutions or dynamics like, for example, the consecutive institutional reforms in Belgium, or the 'Brexit' of the United Kingdom from the EU. Similarly, focusing events like the attacks on the World Trade Center and the financial crisis have forced themselves onto the political agenda of many countries, while terrorist attacks in Madrid, London, Paris and Brussels occurred in a very different (international and domestic) contexts and affected these countries in very different ways. No previous work has examined foreign policy change across a large number of countries in a systematic and comparative way. The goal of this project is twofold. First, we aim to assess and understand the major foreign policy changes that have occurred in a wide range of countries. Second, we aim to look at the differences and similarities among the dynamics of change to come to a better understanding of why and how countries reorient their foreign policy focus. The innovative aspect of this project is that it provides a unique opportunity to discern patterns in the dynamics of change trough systematic comparison; what are the drivers and inhibitors of change? We aim to do so by examining “European” countries. While this limits us to the strict European context, this also provides the advantage of comparability and coherence. The goal is to qualitatively assess and describe the evolutions that have occurred in specific countries, supported by empirical evidence wherever possible. Finally, we believe there is both an academic and practitioner’s need for such a project. On the one hand, academia has, so far, not been very successful in explaining foreign policy change, as most theories focus on the stability of the international system. On the other hand, practitioners and scholars currently lack decent scientific work on the (recent) evolutions in foreign policy in specific countries, on the drivers of change, the impact of external and domestic events, as well as on the role of political actors and institutions.